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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have located where 3 gobblers roost just about every night midway up steep hillside. In the morning they normally fly down and go lower. My question is, will they enter the roost by gliding in from above or will the make a much more difficult entry by flying up from the downhill side where they had went in the morning?
 

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Turkeys aren't really made to fly well....and typically won't go out of their way to put extra effort in....so my guess would be they come in from the top.


I had a group patterned one spring. I thought they walked clear across the valley in the pasture and into the fields on the roost side and would fly in from there...they always spent the evenings in the fields on the other side.


Nope. The flew from the other hillside and landed in the trees above my head lol. Pretty smart about it...they had to fly 75yds or so straight across the open valley into the trees.
 

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I agree with mauser. Almost always see them fly up from the up hill side. And alot of times fly down to the uphill side. But the fly down direction is usually harder to predict in my opinion.
As soon as ya have them "figured out" you will likely be reminded that turkeys will be turkeys and scratching your head as they do something you didnt consider.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks very much for the good answers, I will try to hunt the flat on top and hopefully they will work their way across it prior to taking flight.
 

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I would disagree significantly with the above statement turkeys are not designed well to fly. Number one, turkeys in our state have never been too inclined to have specific roost trees. When they do it has more to do with a secure flydown in the morning than anything else. And is usually a result of human pressure. As far as my 50 years plus shows, I've seen on many occasions mature gobblers fly easily up mountain from open areas a 1/4 mile away. Most gobblers in this pattern will not fly down until they see a hen or hens. Most hunters will try to close on these birds at an early occasion, moving under roosting hens and spoiling their own game. These are also the birds that become 'easy' the first morning no hens show up. Which this year here in NC PA looks to be about June 30. My hunts are now long quiet affairs near forest clearings. I am seeing hens and gobblers but not hearing much at all but extremely soft tree clucks if anything at all. Eight random gobbles all spring,in the midst of plenty of sign. Tough year. winter scouting showed high populations of mature birds and also very young hens (late hatch) in large numbers. Boils down to covering a lot of territory and doing a lot of listening, and hoping.
 
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