The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,651 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This forum has inspired me to start a project behind my house. See http://www.huntingpa.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Main=95822&Number=1146107#Post1146107

Through Spring and Summer, I sprayed round up three times killing all the grass and weeds on this particular corner of my lot. I then labored for hours and hours (enter worlds smallest violin to show sympathy) moving rocks and digging out rocks with a mattock. I lined the rocks up on the edge of the plot. I braved masses of snakes, gnats, and hornets several hours a week preparing the site. I hit the last bit of remaining weeds with round up and spread 200 lbs of lime about ten days ago. Yesterday, knowing a good rain was in the forecast, I felt the time had come to plant. I first ran over the plot with a spike aerator pulled behind my atv. Its all I had a figured i would give it a try. It actually did an ok job. I selected a turnip/brassica blend for the plot. I also mixed in a clover mix just for the outside edges. I broadcasted with a hand spreader and fertilized as well. I ran over the entire plot with my atv making sure to cover as much as possible. The soil was moist and loose much like a good farm field so I believe enough seed to soil contact was established. When it was all done, I stood back gazed at my masterpiece. It has been a fun project and i hope it grows. Lessons learned so far: plottin aint easy playa. my hats off to the food plotters.
Questions remaining: The plot is roughly only 5,000 square feet. I sowed about 1.5 pounds of turnip/brassica mix and 1 pound or less of the clover mix along the edges. This was what was recomended by the seed company I purchased from. I felt like I didnt sow enough seed. Is that a common feeling? Should I have sowed more since I did not plow or disk? Can I sow more later if they dont come up thick enough? I would also like to add that I did cut corners. First one being no soil test. Ill send one away in the spring for sure. This year was just a taste to see if i enjoy it. Also, this is more of an experiment and observation plot. I dont plan to hunt over it. Thanks for reading and enjoy the pics below.

This is the view from my back window one afternoon last winter. There was a total of eight deer in this group looking for something to eat.


This young button buck dug deep for something to eat.


This same button, who i believe is still around sporting spikes now, stands at the top of what is now my backyard foodplot during a foggy morning in early March.


Top of the plot.


Natural hedge should provide the deer with some escape cover. I also hit this bottom edge with round up and put down clover mix.


A look from the bottom.


Another look from the other bottom corner. And look we already have a customer.


Trails leading to the plot. I guess I could find a place to hang a tree stand.


Top corner.


Hickory and Oaks are plentiful along the woodline.


Birds eye view from my roof. At this point, I realized I was going to far with the photos.


These are my numbers.


My clover mix.


I will update with growth pics. Thanks again for reading.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,273 Posts
Shady, next year you need to RoundUp your whole back yard(if your ole lady will let you) and plant it all in a food plot!

I think you're fine with the seed to soil contact. I also think you used enough seed. Too much is more of a bad thing than not enough IMO.

The brassica and turnip mix should do well. As you know, they will not be utilized until a good heavy frost when they sweeten up.

Arrowleaf clover is a winter annual. It is a good clover to plant in early to mid fall and is most successful during a wet fall. It is very intolerant of a dry fall and may not do well if the soil dries out as the seedlings are small and slow growing at first. If it gets established early on, it provides good forage into the cooler months and then great forage come the following spring. It is usually dead by July the following year as it cannot handle the warm weather.

Alsike clover is well adapted to acidic soils, but does poorly in areas that are not moist. So if the area you planted can get hit by drought and dry, it may not do well. It is a perennial and should establish fine with a fall planting.

Yellow sweet clover is a biannual. The first year after planting it produces nothing but leafy growth with no flowers. The second year it produces bright yellow flowers. It is very drought tolerant, but doesn't handle acidic soils well. It has a very deep tap root which helps with its drought tolerance and its ability to bring up deeply trapped soil nutrients to the surface. I have had a lot of good luck with it in my food plots and the deer love it. It also reseeds fairly well on its own.

Crimson clover is an excellent clover to plant in the fall. It is a winter annual. It will boom early giving the deer some good food then the growth will slow and even stop in the extreme cold of winter. Then next spring it will take off again and do great when it will go to seed. It is tolerant of soil acidity and fairly drought tolerant as well.

Let's hope we keep getting rain and take some pictures of the deer you attract in. I might come over and shoot one...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
Nice Job! I hope you enjoy watching the plot from your house as much as I enjoy mine. Hunting over it will be like icing on the cake
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,858 Posts
Saweet Shady! This got me thinking about doing my new back yard perhaps next spring.... Thx! I'm just trying to get the front yard bush-wacked for now so I can keep it mowed down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,651 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Woodsnut said:
Saweet Shady! This got me thinking about doing my new back yard perhaps next spring.... Thx! I'm just trying to get the front yard bush-wacked for now so I can keep it mowed down.
Cool. I keep getting more ideas as well. I only have a little less than 2 acres, but wow, the yard work involved. Takes up alot of my time in the summer.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top