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My wife picked me up Ruark's "The Old Man and the Boy, and The Old Man's Boy Grows Older" A bit before my time, but a lot of the stories brought back similar memories of when I was a boy. Also, since I was posting on a book, I wanted to say that my favorite outdoor writer has always been Gene Hill. He could paint a picture in your mind with his words, and capture the essence of why we love what we do at the same time.
 

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Have you read Ruark Remembered yet? It is a good read.
 

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I'm a big fan of Gene Hill as well, I've never read any Ruark YET. Yet being the keyword.
 

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If you haven't read Something of Value, Uhuru and the Honey Badger you should try to do so.
 

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The only book by Ruark that I actually did not like was THE HONEY BADGER, John. Not sure why, but it just didn't connect with me.

Another wonderful writer was Corey Ford. Have you ever read his JUST A DOG? I picked up a treasury of THE LOWER FORTY stories last year and couldn't put it down. I think I knew most of those characters, and a few of them sometimes hunt out of our camp.
 

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Ruark seemed to be a tortured Soul. Of course, it's almost a pre-requiem of so many novelists, Poe, Hemmingway, Hunter S. Thompson etc.... Many were actually societal misfits, but had the uncanny ability to transfer their emotions to prose.

As far as Rourke, I don't care much for folks that denounce the greatest and most opportunistic country in the world. Reckon I have a beef with 1/2 of Capitol Hill.
 

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Fleroo said:
Ruark seemed to be a tortured Soul. Of course, it's almost a pre-requiem of so many novelists, Poe, Hemmingway, Hunter S. Thompson etc.... Many were actually societal misfits, but had the uncanny ability to transfer their emotions to prose.

As far as Rourke, I don't care much for folks that denounce the greatest and most opportunistic country in the world. Reckon I have a beef with 1/2 of Capitol Hill.

???
 

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Not quite sure what put the bug up his, ummm nose, but he vowed to never return to his native North Carolina, and decided to live out what turned out to be his short life in Spain.
 

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He may not have returned to NC but he set up a scholarship fund at U of NC. He had serious problems with his parents mooching money once he hit it big, he completely supported them, bought them a house and they kept comming back for more which may have been part of the reason he didn't go back, of course we will never know since he bled to death on a flight to the hospital.
 

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By all accounts, he wanted to emulate his idol, Hemmingway. And I guess he succeeded somewhat in doing that. From "the look", to the African adventures, to the smokin and boozin. Only thing left out may be the womanizing...... MAYBE.
 

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No not by all accounts, that is a lot of hooey! He was called "the poor man's Hemmingway" by some as a compliment, but he didn't see it as a compliment at all. In fact he was more prolific than Hemmingway. Hemmingway was not his idol, although he knew him, but not well, that was something he was accused of by his detractors. There is no doubt Ruark was influenced to a small measure by Hemmingway, but idolized him, nope. Actually, Ruark was in Africa more than Hemmingway and understood the country a lot more than Hemmingway. If you want to read about Ruark and understand him, read Ruark Remembered by Alan Richie, his personal secretary, it will take you from begining to end of a not so easy life. I think Ruark was a better writer than Hemmingway.
 

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I think Ruark was a better writer than Hemmingway.
Absolutely! I was forced to read two Hemingway works(The Old Man And The Sea, and The Sun Also Rises) while a college student. I have never needed to be forced to read Ruark's writing.
 

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No not by all accounts, that is a lot of hooey! He was called "the poor man's Hemmingway" by some as a compliment, but he didn't see it as a compliment at all. In fact he was more prolific than Hemmingway. Hemmingway was not his idol, although he knew him, but not well, that was something he was accused of by his detractors. There is no doubt Ruark was influenced to a small measure by Hemmingway, but idolized him, nope. Actually, Ruark was in Africa more than Hemmingway and understood the country a lot more than Hemmingway. If you want to read about Ruark and understand him, read Ruark Remembered by Alan Richie, his personal secretary, it will take you from begining to end of a not so easy life. I think Ruark was a better writer than Hemmingway.
Phew... that's quite abit to ingest there big guy.


In fact he was more prolific than Hemingway.
:eek:, John, John, John. Don't yell at me (yeah right
) for trying to put words in your mouth, but don't you mean YOU like him as a novelist more than YOU like Hemingway ?

I think Ruark was a better writer than Hemingway.
You are certainly entitled to choose Ruark over Hemingway. However, the rest of the world may take exception.
. There is this little-known
novel called "A Farewell to Arms" that just may be the most reviewed and studied piece of work in the history of academia..... short of possibly Bill Shakespeare.

Hemingway was not his idol, although he knew him, but not well,
More times than not, a person doesn't truly know their role model. How can it be disputed that their lifestyles were so dissimilar. Could be I'm wrong, but all signs to me point to him having Hemingway envy.


I don't want to totally bash Ruark. In all fairness, he was good at his trade, just not AS GOOD as some others.
 
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