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While we're pondering end of season thoughts, I just figured I'd add another one for discussion.

We often hear folks say, "We're trying to reverse nature when trying to call a gobbler to a hen call." That the gobbler gobbles and the hen goes to him.

I've spent a lifetime in the turkey woods and I only find that to be partially true. I'd say it's about 50/50 (maybe 60/40) hens go to gobbler, gobblers go to hen.

What's your thoughts/ experiences?
 

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fall gobbler what we saw fits that to a tee, even a hen flying up in the early morning to be next to here man versus him flying down and going directly to her. Good insight and reflection. Congrats on your awesome season in all the areas you hunted this spring.
 

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Agreed.I've seen hens walk away countless times and the gobblers followed.When the hens are breeding,they'll usually go to the gobblers but they aren't always breeding during the season.Turkeys don't always or never do anything.That's why they're challenging to kill at times and easy other times.
 

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I don't buy that a gobbler always waits for hens, especially once he is on the ground. It seems to me that he is quite a bit more likely to do so if he is on the roost and knows hens are also roosted nearby. Even then, I don't think that he waits nearly all of the time. On the ground, there's been MANY times that I've had toms I was working go to hens instead, in situations where I knew for certain that a hen did not approach him first. Probably an indicator of my weak calling skills, but that doesn't change the fact that he actively went to hens rather than having them come to him.

Case in point: Last day of the Kentucky season, we worked a tom for two hours. He flew down and gobbled quite a bit, shifted around several times on different approach routes, and finally turned tail and hustled his lonely butt to another field to some hens there. I hadn't heard them, but he must have, as the trail camera picked him up hurrying to the field, all by himself; we bumped him from his strutting for the ladies in that field 20 minutes later. (Lucky for us, we already had his competitor slung over our shoulder at that point.)
 

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I have seen both scenerios, but I know one thing if you mess up on a set up that you think the gobbler flew down, and end up right under him, if you make a call he is going to sit there and wait until he sees a hen. LOL boy that was a fail.

But again is this referring to on the roost? I have had set up on birds that flew into a strutting area and just hung out there gobbling, waiting for the hen to come to him.
 

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as always, especially with turkey, just because something is supposed to happen doesnt mean it does. nature is setup for hens to go to the toms. they gobble to let hens know where they are. they strut to attract hens. gobblers are colorful, just like pheasants, etc, to attract the females. that's the general natural structure.

again, just because its supposed to be that way, doesnt mean it happens. boys will be boys. when the ladies arent interested, you know we're still gonna chase it a little just to see. it happens. thats what us hunters play on- the fact anything can happen out there, despite whats supposed to happen, or even, use whats supposed to happen as part of our strategy because of it.

think of the birds you've shot, those have gotten lucky enough to shoot more than several. how did your 2 year olds act, how did your 3's, and how about your 4's? i'm willing to guess *on average* the younger birds were more vocal and willing to come in, and the older birds were less talkative and hung back. i've never shot an easy 4 year old. i've shot a bunch of excited 2 year olds. on average, i'm guessing older birds are more apt to play natures part as they mature into typical roles.
 

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It's not set in stone, so to me, it doesn't matter one bit.

We've all seen gobblers come to our hen calls and we've all seen hens pass us on the way to the gobbler.
 

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I agree with the OP. The reason a gobbler gobbles is to attract hens. That's why he gobbles from the roost. If they come, he flys down and has a good time. If they don't he flys down and maybe goes looking for them, or maybe not.

We aren't really reversing nature so much as we're giving him what he thinks are high odds of scoring. Figure it this way -- he's a guy. He doesn't always think clearly.


Steve.
 

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I agree that hens coming to gobblers only is not a set in stone rule.
Heck, look at humans- in nature the guys are supposed to "chase" down the girls- not always the case... or so I've heard...lol
 

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That that is definitely not a 100% true saying. Trust me, I'm not that good of a turkey hunter to reverse that nature state of things lol. Gobblers readily go to hens just like the opposite happens.
 

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An old turkey mentor told me once that the birds really don't need to talk. They just know where the others are much of the time.

That was hard to swallow at the time but, as the years go by I believe he was onto something.

I have seen hens travel far distances very quickly to get bred. Have had Toms travel far to breed as well.
 

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Where the girls go Mr. Tom and the Bucks go! Sometimes he likes the sound of that strange hen and sometimes he has something better to go to!
 

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Kip Feroce said:
An old turkey mentor told me once that the birds really don't need to talk. They just know where the others are much of the time.

That was hard to swallow at the time but, as the years go by I believe he was onto something.

I have seen hens travel far distances very quickly to get bred. Have had Toms travel far to breed as well.
Yes, several times I've seen gobblers and hens get together and neither made a sound.

Steve.
 

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Just this year I watched two gobblers starting to gobble about nine o clock every ten or fifteen seconds in the middle of this big field twenty minutes later two long beards three jakes and one hen come running to them.
 
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