The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are the habits of resident woodcock...

Do they produce resident woodcock?
What is their range?
Are resident woodcock mostly cocks or hens?
How do they survive when the ground is frozen and they can't get to worms? Travel outside their normal range?
Is there a trend that woodcock are becoming more resident birds?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,490 Posts
jamesh,
The man you want to have a conversation with is the Pa
Sportsman, his knowledge of Woodcock is Top Shelf.
Might want to drop him some private mail.
Pine Creek/Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I missed him out at the WCLoPA 'Woodcock Weekend.' They had some great presenters. I left with more appreciation and interest in sky dancers for sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,648 Posts
Every year I get woodcock behind my house in february and March.

Every year by April, like now, I don't hear or see them anymore. I don't know if they've moved on, but they don't seem to be around right now. At least in that spot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,449 Posts
jamesh said:
What are the habits of resident woodcock...

Do they produce resident woodcock?
What is their range?
Are resident woodcock mostly cocks or hens?
How do they survive when the ground is frozen and they can't get to worms? Travel outside their normal range?
Is there a trend that woodcock are becoming more resident birds?
The first thing that we need to do is define "resident". Resident birds are birds that set up shop in a particular area.

The clutch usually imprints on their hatch area BUT they won't necessarily return to the exact same spot. They could return to an area miles away.

Woodcock move quite a bit during the spring and summer. Some move upwards of a mile to and from feeding / night time cover.

Sex ratio is about 1:1 or so.

Woodcock do eat other terrestrial invertebrates and will also move to areas of standing / moving water like seeps where inverts can be accessed when other ground is frozen.

Your last question is tough to answer because their breeding range can occur anywhere from SC to Canada. They are residents wherever they set up shop.
So it is tough to say.

Hope this helps.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,536 Posts
PA_Sportsman said:
Your last question is tough to answer because their breeding range can occur anywhere from SC to Canada. They are residents wherever they set up shop.
So it is tough to say.
For further clarification on question 5 . . . .
Do you know if the number of females nesting in PA is increasing or decreasing in the last 5, years, 10 years, 20 years?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,449 Posts
Doug, there is no way to really know that. The only indicator of resident birds is singing ground surveys which measure presence of males. For the past 7 yrs or so SGS indicate a stable, static population as opposed to the steady 1.5-2% decline for the 25 yrs prior.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,529 Posts
I've noticed an increase in woodcock the last couple years on my land. I'm certain that is due to the habitat management practices making my land more attractive. I watched one for 15 minutes the other day actively feeding. It was quite enjoyable and not something every hunter gets to experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,033 Posts
I was walking through a field last week and flushed one that only flew 10 ft and landed. I was pretty sure it was a bird on a nest. I didn't want to get too nosey and I just left the area. I always enjoy seeing them. They are unique.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,235 Posts
I saw MANY last wkd in Clearfield co while looking for elk sheds...they were a great distraction from the eye numbing ground search for sheds!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,490 Posts
huntfish2,
Remember where you were and take you dog back to that location come fall, you should have a great time with a dog in those locations.
Pine Creek/Dave
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top