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Discussion Starter #1
My dad ha the 760 that was my great-grandfathers. It has had maybe 2-3 boxes of shells shot through it was always oiled and cleaned after shooting, but still doesn't seem to be holding up. The bluing on the gone looks as if it is wearing off and getting a rust tint to it. Also last year my dad took it hunting and we got in some rain. Apparently the stock got moisture in the wood because the wood of the stock as swollen up. We took the but plate of and the white seal that is on the end of the stock has deteriorated. I have a 760 that was used hard for many years by pap and was in by far more rain the other gun mentioned and has none of the problems that my dad's is having. They are cleaned and taken care in the same way.

I know the gun with problems was purchased at Montgomery Ward. Does anyone know if the 760s made for Montgomery Ward is the same as was sold at gun shops or could it be lesser quality made for chain stores. I searched on line but didn't if d any info. Also any suggestion on what to do with the stock are welcome?
 

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Not sure about a difference in quality, but sounds like some moisture may have gotten to this gun while stored. Especially if it was stored in a gun case in a closet or something. Re-bluing can be done and you can get a new stock for it if you want to have it refurbished.
 

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All the 760s are were the same quality no matter where
you bought them. Is it possible that has been reblued and
refinished poorly in the past?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
To the best of our knowledge it was never reblued ecause my great-grandfather bought it new but passed away shortly after. It was my grandfathers until he passed and now dad and I have the two that he had. I was stored many years in a gun cabinet with rest of my pap's guns and now our's. We have never had this happen to any of our other guns so I as just curious, mostly because I read about the Marlin 336 lever gun having an chain market version in the 30AS, so I thought maybe Remington did the same thing. As far a getting a new stock is there anywhere I can get a stock like the factory one with heck wrong and the white seal between the end of the stock and the but plate? That is what I was looking for but have not yet been successful. I always find them without the white seal.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Also as far as swelling goes, we noticed it last hunting season after buying the first Tuesday where it rained so much. This is why it made me think maybe it was from being in the rain that day, but mine was in the same rain and was fine.
 

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Rain does no gun any good...I'm at the point where any gun with wood stays at home when it pours...I have some synthetic stocked guns for the wet weather now....Once ruined a tackdriving Model 700 because I hunted with it in a downpour.
 

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For those of you that love wood stocks hate synthetic, like me. Here's something that will help.
You can't prevent wood from taking on moisture completely but here's a trick that will help. Remove the stock from the action, remove the butt plate. Every where you can see bare wood apply a coat or two of birchwood casey tru oil. Just rub it in with your fingers, letting it dry between coats. Once the tru oil has dried take a good furniture paste wax and again apply a couple of coats to the complete stock, and every nook and cranny you can get at, then buff with a cloth.Treat it like fine furniture,which it is. The water will bead up and run off just like a newly waxed auto. Repeat the wax at the end of each season when you clean the gun.
 

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jdhaines32 said:
the white seal between the end of the stock and the but plate?
That "seal" is called a white line spacer. I used to have dozen or so laying around here. Some of the older ones where a hard plastic, the newer one a vinyl material of sorts.

Pachmayr stock spacers

You simply grind them to fit.

Bill
 

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The older 760's are noted to have problems with the stocks swelling up as the years go by. It is a common issue with them as the old gun stock finish doesn't hold up like the new stuff does.
As far as the blueing goes, has it ever been stored in a foam padded gun case for any period of time? after time the foam padding will start to take off the blueing. My Dad had that happen to one of his old remingtons.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
As far as I know the gun was always in a wooden gun cabinet with glass doors. We never had any problems with our other guns that have woodn stocks being in the rain but after this as was mention a synthetic stocked gun for down pours is seeming like a good idea. It's. Shame cuz this gun was in great condition but the last year or so has just took a real turn for the worse.

Bill thanks for the link for the white line spacers. The one that was on it seemed to be of a hard plastic but it fell apart when we took the butt plate off.
 

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JD Walnut is an open grained hardwood, which is somewhat odd in American trees, the others being oak and ash. How that pertains to your question is, water travels through walnut. Remington and others of that era using those white plastic spacers all had problems with the buttstock swelling if the gun was standing up wet, even for just a short time. All the moisture travels down the stock, gets trapped at the spacer, and just a few hours later, it swells. I do a "woods" program for kids at schools, and showing open and closed grain is one of my "stunts". I cut strips of oak to pass out, put some dish soap on one end, and have the kids blow on the opposite end. They are always amazed when the soaped end starts to make bubbles. There you have the principal of open grained hardwood.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well tonight we took the stock off the gun, and removed the butt plate, and checked out further. The swelling appears to be clear finish that is on the stock, rather than the actual wood. I guess this is better than the wood itself. My dad sanded down the area that had the swelled finish, and the wood is seems real good yet. Does anyone know what type of clear finish is on the 760 stocks? I thought I read somewhere that it is some sort of plastic clear. Our neighbor mentioned that maybe a wipe on Polyurethane would be close to matching the original finish, since it isn’t just an oil finish. Looking for ideas and suggestions. Thanks again
 

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I would try birch wood cassey tru oil. you may have to use 5 or 6 coats. Just rub it in with your fingers, yeah its sticky when it drys. After a coat has dried buff it smooth with 0000 steel wool, repeat until desired gloss is achieved. Don't know if you can do just a spot, may have to refinish entire stock.
 

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remington had a line of store brand 7600's called sportsman 76 in the 80's. they had birch stocks and kind of muddy blue finish. the 760's all had walnut stocks and a Dupont RK-W gloss finish which almost impossible to duplicate. the truoil does a nice job though after a bunch of coats
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Quick update on the stock on my dad's 760. He sanded off the finish that had swelled from getting wet. He thne restained the areas that needed it, and then refinished the entire stock using a Polyurethen that he got. He applied 5 coats of the Polyurehtne sanding between the first 3 coats, and then using steel wool between the last coats. It turned out very nice, and mathces the forend stock very nicely. I also ordered him one of the new white line butt stock spacers, so it has the orginal look as well. Again thanks to everyone who provided assistance in this post.
 
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