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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 700, 22-250, that was manufactured in the '70s, I have been using it for 10+ years with no problem until this past week.
After I cycle the action and put the saftey on, it is fine. But if the trigger is bumped while the saftey is on, it will fire as soon as the saftey is pushed off. If the trigger is not touched or bumped it will not fire when the saftey is pushed off.

My question is what should I do? Should I send it back to Remington to be fixed? or Is there any local shops in SW PA that can fix it? or Will an aftermarket trigger assembly fix this?

I've searched a good bit on the web about this and all I get done reading is people criticising Remington for letting this go and then it starts an argument. I dont't care about all that crap, I just want the gun fixed right!
 

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DO NOT take it to a local shop where you WILL pay the bill.. Contact Remington customer service and discuss it with them..Most likely they will give you shipping instructions for the rifle and fix it free of charge and ship it back to you free..
 

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Sounds like more of the SAME issues highlighted by the NBC Dateline episode.

I agree with Burk313, I would not use the gun until it is fixed. Good luck to you, and please keep us posted.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
After this happend it went right back into the cabinet.

I will definately talk to Remington.

To my knowledge the trigger has not been touched. My dad has owned it since the late '80s, before that I don't know. It's just weird that I have been using for years without a single problem until now.
 

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Sounds like you are not the first owner and if so it may have been adjusted too much on the edge or even heavily lubricated. I've taken it to this edge a number of times and then set it a little higher. Take a look at the 2nd paragraph on safety checks.
http://www.quarterbore.com/library/articles/rem700trigger.html

If it was mine I'd take off the trigger assembly and soak and shake it in lighter fluid, white gas, or mineral spirits. This will clean out any oil or grime that may be in it, don't relubricate, blow it out if possible.

Re-adjust according to above procedure or a similar one (lots out there) using the safety checks in the above.

I think that may cure the problem, if not then call Rem or replace it with an aftermarket trigger.
 

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also, i never place a gun in the up right position after cleaning. I have cleaned more guns than most will in life time due to i shoot a lot. if you or someone else cleaned it and didnt use a bore guide placing it in the cabinet some solvents could of ran back in to the trigger assembly. I always use the bore guide with gun in a cradle or something with forward tilt. Then sometimes i will place gun away with muzzle down for few days.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm sure you would!! not for sale sorry bud!

I'm gonna try cleaning the trigger assembly as tundragriz mentioned, that seems like the most likely problem since this is the first time i've had a problem over the years.
 

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Are you always able to repeat the misfire if you take the steps that you've outlined? How often can you make it re-occur (1 out of 5 tries or 5 out of 5 tries)?

You can clean it, but you need to run it through a full gamut of tests in order to ensure that you fixed it.

If you take it to a smith and all it needs is cleaned, you'll be out a couple bucks, but consider it peace of mind well worth the price to have a professional opinion.
 

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From what I read the problem is with the Walker trigger system on the Remington 700. Remington no longer uses it in production Model 700. I believe they call the new trigger system Pro Max & I have read it can be installed in older model 700's. Other HPA members may have more information.
 

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I posted this before a while back, but I changed the walker trigger out in my sons Model 7 with a Remington X-mark adjustable trigger myself. I ordered the trigger from Brownell's and the change was very easy. I had to dremmel the inside of the synthetic stock a little bit and I had to take just a little metal off of the bolt release lever, very simple. There are many after market triggers for the M700/M7, but I liked the X-mark, and it is not susceptable to the same sear problems of the walker. (if there are any!)
 

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I think the new X-mark Pros are hit and miss, at least when it comes to trigger pull weight. I have no doubt they are very reliable.

I have an X-mark Pro on my new Sendero, and it breaks at 5 lbs. And it cannot be adjusted any more. Will be getting a new Timney to replace it soon.
 

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sigh......

Follow tundra's suggestion before playing Mr. Screwdriver or anything else.

Get a large bottle of Ronson or Zippo lighter fluid, pull the barreled action out of the stock and start dumping the fluid in the trigger, around the sear, firing pin hole in the bolt face and around the bolt shroud and cocking piece. Yes Homer, the bolt can affect the trigger too, timing, handoff ,cocking piece to sear engagement and over-under cocking.

Now is not the time to be cheap, dump some on and in till it runs out all over the place, wait about 5 minutes then dump some more. Repeat until either the fluid runs out clear or the bottle is empty. If the bottle is empty and still doesn't come out clean buy another bottle.

BTW, the instructions (who reads that crap?) are in the 700 User manual. Start reading at page 12. Of course they suggest using Rem Oil, but lighter fluid does a far superior job at both cleaning and lubricating a trigger, or a least Arnold Jewell seems to think so.
Remington Owner's manual

Once the fluid has done it job you don't need to do anything else, no oil and etc. Let it evaporate then reassemble the beast.

After that instead of cleaning it every 20 years ( if ever) get in the habit of it being a once a year thing.

What you may see coming out might look like this ....


A small sample of one I did two days ago, a "well maintained" 700 a friend bought. What you see is a mixture of rust, dried oil and general crud...all from the trigger and I'll bet it hadn't been cleaned since NIB.

I should have taken a picture of the gunk I removed from the locking lug recesses of that well maintained rifle!
 

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tundragriz said:
Sounds like you are not the first owner and if so it may have been adjusted too much on the edge or even heavily lubricated. I've taken it to this edge a number of times and then set it a little higher. Take a look at the 2nd paragraph on safety checks.
http://www.quarterbore.com/library/articles/rem700trigger.html

If it was mine I'd take off the trigger assembly and soak and shake it in lighter fluid, white gas, or mineral spirits. This will clean out any oil or grime that may be in it, don't relubricate, blow it out if possible.

Re-adjust according to above procedure or a similar one (lots out there) using the safety checks in the above.

I think that may cure the problem, if not then call Rem or replace it with an aftermarket trigger.
Did this with my 788 years ago, and it's been fine ever since!!
 

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Your trigger just needs cleaned, thats one area we shooters tend to neglect, take the stock off , take the bolt out, turn your gun upside down spray a good dose of action cleaner in the bottom of your trigger, repeat several times and that should take care of it...
 
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