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Discussion Starter #1
I was hunting yesterday (NY) and, after climbing and getting settled in, drew the bow. I think we all do this. Well, off it went without me touching the trigger! I hooked onto the string and partially drew it several times...ok. Then, to put full poundage on it, I loaded another arrow for a full draw...pointing at the ground. Off it went. Time to go home...after retrieving both arrows.

I have a Fletchunter release...which I love. At home, I drew a couple feet from my block target...after a few tries it went off again. Now, the sensitivity hasn't been adjusted in at least a few years so I didn't think proper adjustment was the issue. I put some alcohol in a cup and swished and flushed the release well. I was surprised at the amount of dirt that came out! And those familiar with a Fletchunter know that there isn't really much to them, far less than most releases. After flushing I shot numerous times and all was fine. Just a heads up that cleaning your release like this once a year may not be a bad idea. Even after that...being a bit paranoid...I lessened the sensitivity just a tad!
 

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How is your loop. sometimes they break down & allow the release to slip thru under tension. had a guy launch an arrow thru a 3D course a couple years ago because of this.

The release was fine. 2 other people used his release on their bows with no problems.
 

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I don't know much about releases except I have a Scott Release that I've had for 15 years that works Great, but I'm starting to get a little worried about the leather strap it shows a lot of wear.
 

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Well son, it's your problem. No one else's

Did you practice enough with the release in practice shooting?
You should have the release working as good as your fingers operate. You should have repeated the firing sequence in practice so often you can fire without looking at the release.
I believe that the finger should be nowhere near the trigger until ready to fire.

If you haven't learned to practice with CALMNESS you don't learn it hunting.
And if you do a herky-jerky movement in hunting you may never learn to hunt with a bow.
If you're self taught, a look at some archery shooters on 'you tube' might help.
 

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mus42tang said:
Well son, it's your problem. No one else's

Did you practice enough with the release in practice shooting?
You should have the release working as good as your fingers operate. You should have repeated the firing sequence in practice so often you can fire without looking at the release.
I believe that the finger should be nowhere near the trigger until ready to fire.

If you haven't learned to practice with CALMNESS you don't learn it hunting.
And if you do a herky-jerky movement in hunting you may never learn to hunt with a bow.
If you're self taught, a look at some archery shooters on 'you tube' might help.
Even I can't figure out this response--the OP said it went off multiple times without even touching the trigger. It went off into a target without touching a trigger. The release malfunctioned. It happens. It had nothing to do with his ability nor his technique. I've had it happen with $185 releases. Anything mechanical can fail to operate properly. The OP got it cleaned out, and now all is fine. His post was an FYI on the equipment, not a technique problem.
 

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I always carry a backup release in my pack. A broken or lost release will certainly ruin a good day of archery hunting. That and toilet paper is a must with me.
 

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SlickShot said:
I always carry a backup release in my pack. A broken or lost release will certainly ruin a good day of archery hunting. That and toilet paper is a must with me.
LOL... The TP is a must.....
 

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I hade a TRU BALL Tornado that I been shooting since they came out. This year, I drew down on a doe, and yep... refused to fire. Pressed the trigger over and over. took me a half our to get it off the loop. Pulled out my back up, and finished off the day, doeless... I then decided this lil feller was done for so i moved on to a TRU FIRE Hardcore 4 finger. If you never tried one, think about it.
 

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SlickShot said:
I always carry a backup release in my pack. A broken or lost release will certainly ruin a good day of archery hunting. That and toilet paper is a must with me.
A spare doesn't take up much room.
I started carrying an extra when I dropped mine out of my stand and had to climb down (climber)
to retrieve it.
 

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A friend of mine is so cheap he wont buy a second release... He has a magnet on a string in case he drops it.. I always hope the release is like aluminium... that will teach him!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Several of you have a spare release...I will next season. Not so much for the failure factor as the dropping from the treestand factor. I'll get another Fletchunter because I love the simplistic design...I'll just clean them once a year in the future! This one worked well on a huge doe I got yesterday afternoon!
 

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I'd probably still be using my Fletchhunter, if I wouldn't have lost it dragging a buck out a few years back. I had the black finish wore off that release in spots. I use my air hose to blow out my releases, bows, guns, etc. Then re-lube when necessary. Especially after being out in rain.
 

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Yes, a second release is in my pack, ever been set in the tree and your release is the last thing I put on and have it fall to the ground and you have to start your process all over again, even with a climber? Makes you mad at yourself. My (2) Scotts are in my bag.

The only thing I double up on is TP, flashlights (actually 3) and a pair of releases.

To the OP: When was the last time you replaced it? They do not last forever and as with every thing else it needs maint. I WD40 mine before the Summer.
 

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Hey, we don't all do it the same way. Or have the same experience.
Why my release has lasted nearly 20 years. The strap was repaired by me after getting chewed up by the dog. Who unfortunately passed away some four years ago.

Every year, I'd spray the trigger mechanism with WD-40 to make sure the trigger wasn't rusted and worked. I would lock the mechanism and fire it a few times to test it. Without using the bow.
Seemed to work for me. And no one is forced to do it the same way. We don't have to do it the same way.
A nearly 20 year test of the same release ought to be worth something.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Yes, testing your release for functionality is a good thing. The Fletchunter over-center is best tested by clamping a piece of string loop in your bench vise. Pull on it with all your might...certainly more than the poundage of your bow. it should not release, and you're good to go. I don't advocate the use of any lubricants...they draw/hold dirt. I'll just keep mine flushed with alcohol and blown with air in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Flogging a dead horse. Since I'm still bow hunting, I found a release exactly like mine on eBay for $40. It is now in my backpack.
 

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Good find! I don't think I could trust that original one again. I had one fail on me this fall while shooting at an elk. First time I ever had an issue with it, pulled the trigger and it didn't release the loop. When I started to let down it went off. That release went in the trash!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Smtn10pt said:
Good find! I don't think I could trust that original one again. I had one fail on me this fall while shooting at an elk. First time I ever had an issue with it, pulled the trigger and it didn't release the loop. When I started to let down it went off. That release went in the trash!
LOL if I had had a failure like that mine would have been beside yours in the garbage! But, if you're familiar with a Fletchunter as I have you'd see where the failure was strictly "dirt induced". The spare release is adjusted, vacuum sealed and in my backpack...hopefully to never be used again! BTW, mine worked on a CO elk, NF moose and two deer prior to failure. I'm done hunting this season...next is three winter 3D leagues followed by a lot of summer 3D's. Plenty of testing time!

Was that a PA elk?
 

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No it was not a PA elk, it was a Montana elk, that tag is way more expensive but at least it wasn't a once in a lifetime hunt!
 

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My old release gets maintenance from time to time.
Spray it with WD 40 and work the release mechanism, while not using it with a bow. Wouldn't take much for it to slip or jam up as a result of sweat, wetness, and dirt. Does spend time in the woods.
Old releases need some attention, when not shooting, to keep on working.
 
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