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Discussion Starter #1
I've only ever used RCBS dies but a local shop has 1 set of hornady and 1 set of redding dies each a different caliber that I've been looking to get and just looking for imput as to how they compare to RCBS by anyone who has used either brand. Thanks in advance for any replies.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I figured they had to be about as good. They also seem to be a little more expensive, but so is everything else... at least for now.
 

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After working with redding dies i wont go back to rcbs...i like working with them better...easier for me...and my rcbs dies dont like to lock and stay where i left em...
 

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I can only see using the bushing dies if you have a custom cut chamber.. there's so much slop in a factory chamber that you wouldn't and couldn't benefit much if at all by using a bushing die. You could actually make it's gap get a little smaller but you'd loose neck tension needed to hold the bullet in place. With a custom cut chamber that's another story completely..you can really make em' shoot with .002-.001 per side gaps, and case life will be about forever because of how little of the brass actually expands.
 

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mauser06 said:
After working with redding dies i wont go back to rcbs...i like working with them better...easier for me...and my rcbs dies dont like to lock and stay where i left em...
A Hornady lock ring will make the RCBS dies stay put. I have a set with the Hornady lock rings on them, and they are much better behaved with holding their settings than my other RCBS sets. I have been meaning to get Hornady rings for my other dies, just haven't gotten to it yet.

I have Redding, RCBS, Hornady, and Lee dies. I like the Reddings the best so far.
 

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one of the benefits of using bushing dies, is that it only sizes the neck once. in a reg die, the neck is sized way down, then is sized again when the expander ball is pulled through. in a bushing die it is sized one time. saves your brass and produces more concentric ammo. the bushing you use is based on the measurement of a seated bullet in the brass your using, then subtract .001" so it really don't matter what your chamber is cut for unless you have a tight neck chamber, and using a thick neck brass like lapua.
6-DASHER said:
I can only see using the bushing dies if you have a custom cut chamber.. there's so much slop in a factory chamber that you wouldn't and couldn't benefit much if at all by using a bushing die. You could actually make it's gap get a little smaller but you'd loose neck tension needed to hold the bullet in place. With a custom cut chamber that's another story completely..you can really make em' shoot with .002-.001 per side gaps, and case life will be about forever because of how little of the brass actually expands.
 

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Thanx tdd! I never thought that any locking ring should work on any die...they all have the same threads though....will have to do that to my rcbs dies...
 
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