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I'd like to get an Xbow, and I've been told the recurves like many Excaliburs are the way to go. They are suposed to be quieter, never need to be tuned, and the strings are supposed to be cheaper to replace when necesary. the only down side is they have wider/bigger limbs which can be awkward in certain circumstances.

Are there any other downsides to the recurves or significant benefits to the compounds Xbows like, say a Ten Point?
 

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They both have there pros and cons. One might be good in one situation but not the next. I went with a Parker Tornado because I just don't like the way the recurves look. Plus Parker is one of the best in the business. Find a shop that'll let you shoot a bunch of them and then go from there.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I was thinking that the KISS principle would be king as well.

My buddy said that the rep/salesmen where he bought his dry fired an Excalibur recurve type, and thats what sold him on that model/brand.
 

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I love my Excalibur but the Exocet 200 limbs sometimes splinter if dry fired, a friend has done it twice with no damage I did it once and splintered the limb but they replaced the limbs free. I don't think most bows will hold up to a dry fire I heard Excaliburs 175lb model will might be the Phoenix. If I kept one item for hunting including guns it would be my Excalibur.
 

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I was looking at Excals for the whole KISS thing also, and was thinking if I needed to I could change the strings...Well, wife bought me an anniversary present and it was a Horton Brotherhood. I'm very happy with it so far for a compound.
 

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I hated my recurve bow in the treestand, picked up the Excal when crossbows went legal and had the feeling I would feel the same about it, that is when I went compound.

Loved my recurve bow for sneaking along logtails, etc.., as it was just a stick, I hate the crossbow in that scenario, no matter if compound or recurve type, sneaking with them is tough.

So my .02...treestand= compound style, ground/blind=either, stillhunting= sore arms and awkward movements no matter what you pick.

I am greatly due a visit Arrowhead on my server though, so that can't change string thing holds some consideration. If I did have a recurve I would of changed my string out by now, I should be OK for 3 more weeks. Then it is going in the shop before late season.
 

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YankeeHunter said:
I was thinking that the KISS principle would be king as well.

My buddy said that the rep/salesmen where he bought his dry fired an Excalibur recurve type, and thats what sold him on that model/brand.
See, you are already starting to get an idea as to what is important to you. Dry firing is never a good idea on any bow and a lot of the better compounds come with an anti dryfire mechanism. Price should be a consideration, serving/string wear,too. Is there anyone nearby who can work on it or will you do most of the work yourself. Only you can decide what is right for you and your hunting situation. I have owned a Stykeforce for 3 years and probably am approaching 700 or 800 shots on the original string with no problems. The one thing I don't like is the weight, but I knew that going in. I did my research for a few months before I bought it. The main reason I got it was for the compactness of hunting out of my permanant treestand and it works perfectly for that.
 

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YankeeHunter said:
I'd like to get an Xbow, and I've been told the recurves like many Excaliburs are the way to go.
I usually recommend Excalibur, TenPoint and Parker because of thier warranties and customer service.

They are suposed to be quieter
Recurve crossbows, on average are louder and exibit more vibration than compound styles.


never need to be tuned
Have to watch for string stretch. That will change the brace height. Nice thing with the Excal is that the string can be taken off and twists added in a snap.


and the strings are supposed to be cheaper to replace when necesary.
Surely a advantage. Can swap out a $18 string in a snap, set your brace height with twists and you are good to go.


the only down side is they have wider/bigger limbs which can be awkward in certain circumstances.
Yep, the wingspan is big and can reduce your shooting arc from a treestand. The other downside is they are harder to cock as the effort builds as you draw composed to a compound which has some let off. Generally, they are slower as well compared to equal poundage compounds.

Alot to consider but the Excaliburs are bulletproof and are quality bows.

Take a look at Middleton bows as well of you are considering a recurve style. Few distributors in USA but Arrowhead is a dealer. They are getting impressive speeds from the recurve bows and they are very light. I was impressed when I shot one.
 

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Stogey said:
They both have there pros and cons. One might be good in one situation but not the next. I went with a Parker Tornado because I just don't like the way the recurves look. Plus Parker is one of the best in the business. Find a shop that'll let you shoot a bunch of them and then go from there.
agree 100% first season using a crossbow, Parker Tornado, and harvested a fat doe at 20yds with a clean pass through this past friday and then took a nice 7pt on sat. am again at 20yds with a clean pass through. Parker Tornado is top shelf and comes with a lifetime warranty.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the advice fellas.

Price, quality, performance, and reliability are my key considerations, but I lack experience with Xbows, so I guess I'm just going to have to go shoot some and see how they feel. I'm not too concerned about looks in a bow when compared to things such as weight and performance.

I have a climbing stand, but I know a guy from work who smacked the tree he was up in with the limb of his Xbow last year when he fired it at a deer. I like to hunt on the ground, but the drawing back of a Vbow makes this a lot tougher due to the movement. An Xbow would give me a lot mre flexibility in this.
 

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If you are mostly a ground hunter, I would get an Excalibur Exocet 200. I have one and they are just plain and sweet!! If you were closer to PGH I would let you try mine.
 
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