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Discussion Starter #1
What does putting a stiffer recoil spring in a handgun accomplish?
 

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I assume you mean an automatic.
Now there are different auto designs and the recoil spring works differently in each.

In a locked action (1911) the spring is different than in most 22rf which are blow-back.

Not sure why you ask???? The gun will work best with the recoil spring is was designed for.

As a genral rule a heavier spring will cause the auto to stovepipe. Namely, it will not recoil sufficiently to eject, and it will start forward and catch the fired shell up in the air.

Without knowing the auto model no one can say.

Stay with the factory spring, unless you know the design function of the weapon and have some gunsmithing experience.
 

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Stogey said:
What does putting a stiffer recoil spring in a handgun accomplish?
It can keep the slide from recoiling to harshly with heavier bullets and hotter loads. As stated, factory springs are pretty well tuned for the majority of standard pressure loads and going with either a lighter or heavier spring can be problematic.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes it is a semi auto 9mm I was thinking about changing out the recoil spring in. I believe it is currently a 17lb spring thats in there and I was thinking about changing it out for either a 20lb or 22lb spring. I never thought about the possibility of creating a stovepiping issue if I changed the spring. I guess I thought only about the pros. The pros that I thought of and am not sure if this is correct or not was that it would reduce the felt recoil, making it not such a sharp snap, and it would reduce the amount of muzzle flip. Its a model CZ-75 Compact in 9mm.
 

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Putting a heavier spring would reduce the felt recoil very slightly, as it would store just a very small amount of the recoil for a fraction of a second longer But this would not even be perceptable to you. If would cause major functioning problems. The recoil spring you have really doesn't absorb any of the recoil of the gun, and a stronger one wouldn't either.

A better way would be to get some soft rubber grips. These usually reduce the felt recoil about 10-15% and on most guns do not change the cycling.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
What about muzzle flip/jump/movement? Would that be less for a quicker follow up shot?
 

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Just an opinion here. My feeling is that you will increase muzzle rise at the beginning of recoil unless you grip it more tightly because it requires more force to start the slide movement. The overall recoil will not increase or decrease because it is the same bullet and gun but the recoil curve will change putting more effort into the beginning of it. For certain you will need to have a tighter grip to keep the muzzle down at the beginning of recoil to counteract the increased spring tension as the slide begins to move. With hot loads and heavy bullets I think the increased spring tension will smooth out the recoil but probably have muzzle rise over a longer time because the rearward movement of the slide will be longer. A light spring would work the action faster but more sharply at the end.

I have never increased spring tension but I have decreased it for those that don't grip the gun tightly ending up with jams because they don't resist the movement enough. With a heavy spring you need to restrain the gun more during recoil so the action can overcome the extra resistance of the stiffer spring. If you don't the gun will rotate in your hand not providing enough resistance against the gun movement and it will jam.

I look at it this way, if you are aiming the pistol with no spring or a very light spring, another person could slam the action back without you coming off the target much, but it would hit sharply at the end. If the spring was very stiff they would have to jerk it harder pulling the gun up and back over a longer time, it would feel softer but you would have to fight to keep it down.
 

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What caliber gun are we talking about here? A .45 acp really doesn't have all that much recoil that you really have to worry about muzzle flip.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
9mm John S. As far as the heavier guide rod goes I will be replacing the current one which is plastic with a stainless steel one.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I don't either especially since the gun is built on a steel frame.
 

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The recoil spring should be tailored to the particular load. A hot load should have a heavier spring and its purpose is to keep the frame from being damaged or battered. This applies particularly to 1911 type pistols.

I have multiple springs for a couple of 45s and 10 mm’s that I have. The reason being is that I shoot light target loads and heavier hunting loads out of the same pistols.

I cannot remember ever needing anything other than the stock spring in any 9mm that I've owned.
 
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