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"That area of central Texas seems to have a concentration of black 'white-tailed' deer, although it is still extremely rare to find them," he wrote in answer to my email query. "This is a wild deer, but resides in a greenbelt near a neighborhood.

The two fawns in the photos are twins, but only the one is black."

The technical term for all-black (or mostly-black) deer is "melanistic." Of the three generally recognized pigment anomalies in whitetail deer (including albinism and piebald markings), experts say melanism is the rarest.




 

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i saw a black 4 point buck about 40 years ago on SGL 44 just outside ridgway, PA

just playing around back then learning about bowhunting. to far for me to shoot at with a recurve but what an awesome sight.

thanks for bringing that memory back.
 

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Cool looking deer!!
 

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Looks like momma has a bit of melanism in her. Notice how dark the the top of her nose and forehead are. Melanism is a much rarer occurrence than albinism.
 

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Not to throw water on this, because lots and lots of people have not seen it. A similar fawn was born on Colorado's western slope in 2005, and covered in <span style="font-style: italic">North American Whitetail</span> and probably other magazines. These pictures make the rounds every year, giving people who have not heard about it the chance to see it.

The pictures come from the website of R.M.Buquoi Photographics, a Georgetown, Texas photographer (just north of Austin).

For some reason the folks at Snopes felt the need to cover it starting in 2010.

Beautiful, for sure. I hope I get to see one some day.

Steve.
 
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