The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
22,296 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Two men have been stricken with tularemia, a potentially deadly disease commonly known as rabbit fever. Officials believe both men were infected while rabbit hunting in eastern North Carolina.

Rabbit fever is caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis, according to the National Institutes of Health. Though the disease is rare, it can be fatal if left untreated. Symptoms of tularemia include fever, joint and muscle stiffness, skin ulcers, diarrhea, sweating and weight loss. People infected with rabbit fever can also develop pneumonia.

"It can make you very, very sick," Marilyn Haskell, epidemiologist with the North Carolina Division of Public Health, told the Wilson Times. The disease can be treated with antibiotics, and both men with the condition appear to be recovering.
Learn something new every day....Never heard of Rabbit Fever before....Has this ever been reported in PA?

Rabbit Fever Strikes 2 Hunters
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,127 Posts
yep watch for white spots on rabbit liver and a sickly sluggish moving rabbit.... Personally if I kill a sickly sluggish rabbit it's getting hung in a tree and I'm not looking at the liver...

<span style="font-style: italic">Tularemia is a bacterial disease of rabbits that is transmittible to man, usually through openings in the skin. Hunters who notice small white or yellow spots on the surface of the rabbit's liver when they are field dressing it should discard the entire rabbit immediately. During the early stages of the disease the liver can appear normal, though the infected rabbit may behave oddly, move slowly or be easily captured. It is a good idea to wear rubber gloves when dressing a rabbit and it is important to always cook rabbit meat thoroughly. Tularemia is transmitted between rabbits by fleas and ticks. Rabbits die from the disease, so it is not a problem once there has been a good hard frost and the temperature remains cool. A hard frost kills ticks and fleas which carry the disease, and a rabbit infected prior to the freeze will normally die within a few days of contracting the disease.
</span>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,085 Posts
One of my uncles had it about 30 years ago in Lancaster Co. He won't eat rabbit to this day because of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
804 Posts
I shot a rabbit on sat. that appeared to have worms in the small intestines ...the intestines were moving 10 min. after I shot it and was gutting it
It's still good though..in my freezer now
.... As far as Tularemia... I don't live in fear of getting it or lyme disease either. Both treatable with antibiotics .... We should be more afraid of Gov. regulated meat like beef or poultry...can you say pink slime ?
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top