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Discussion Starter #1
In my quest for another bow, I'm really getting an education. I'm looking for a new hunting bow. Up until now all the bows I've purchased have been 60-70 lb bows.I always shot about 63 lbs for a hunting bow. I've noticed recently, especially in cold weather, pulling a 63 lb bow back on a buck isn't as easy as it used to be. I've been told by several people that shooting a bow at its peak weight is better than shooting it at a lower weight. Can somebody explain if that's true and if so, why?
 

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There were some tests done to prove or disprove that theory. I don't remember the web site where I read all the testing they did but what it boiled down to is with newer bows a 50-60 set at 60lbs and a 60-70 set at 60lbs there was less than 1% difference in effeciency and chronograph results, but when the test was conducted with a few older bows the difference was much greater with some bows seeing about 10% difference.
 

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I think the newer bows with piviting pockets it really doesn't matter. Older bows it did, that the limbs just piveted.
 

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I don't know the science behind this idea that you should have a bow set at its peak draw weight compared to lower but I have heard this from many people. If you are finding 63lbs to be a bit difficult I would buy a 50-60 lb bow when you get a new one. It seems 60lb draw weights are very popular. For deer hunting 60lbs is more than enough. With my bow which has 50-60 lb limbs on it if I turn my limbs in all the way the bow actually goes to 62lbs so you may find that with some bows you can get more draw weight than what it is said to peak at.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
JD3 said:
With my bow which has 50-60 lb limbs on it if I turn my limbs in all the way the bow actually goes to 62lbs so you may find that with some bows you can get more draw weight than what it is said to peak at.
That was also the case with the Mathews Z7 that I shot.
 

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Some time ago that used to be the case but I've been told that, with newer bows, it isn't the case anymore. Also, with some bows you can get 55-65 limbs rather than the more popular combinations of 50-60 or 60-70. Even though the manufacturer doesn't have the 55-65 listed they can be ordered that way.
 

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When I got my Z7 we ordered a "heavy" 60 that came in at 64# so I can back it down some and shoot it at 61-62#. When I shot 70# bows I never had them set above 65#. If you really need another pound or two for some reason you can always tweak the string and cable.
 

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I agree with all that's been stated. The only reason I would have to buy a 60-70# bow (and turn it down to 63-65 to hunt with) is for the quicker resale. Seems that there are still a lot of young guys full of AquaVelva and Testosterone that want the 70# draw.
 
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