The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

161 - 180 of 182 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
525 Posts
Mapping

To get the existing maps, regardless of accuracy, into a standardized database format.
It all started with the county real estate tax office. The leeches needed to know who owned what and how many acres to assess taxes. Hence the name assessment office. The assume that office morphed into the GIS office as technology advanced.
Leeches discovered that with GIS and aerial photography they could monitor your property easier, discovering heretofore undocumented improvements that will result in higher taxes.
Yes as was mentioned above mapping was mostly based on plots of deeds by mostly minimum wage personnel back in the 50’s or 60’s. Many of the deeds did not “close”, meaning if you used the deed as a treasure type map and followed the directions and distances you would not come back to your beginning point, because of errors in the deed. These drawings were put together as best as could be done and used for assessment purposes. They were then stretched, bent and manipulated to fit aerial photos with roads, fence roads and other objects to create a truly “accurate” GIS map.
Most times the maps are surprisingly accurate, sometimes not so much. However if you are looking at a GIS map and near a “property line” and cross a fence row, tree line, stone wall, old wire, forest to field, or even a different age timber, rest assured you have crossed a property line, regardless of what your wiz bang app says.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
what i dont understand is why purple. a hunter would have to come right up to the trees to see it. why not use something like floresent lime green that can be seen from a distance.
It is because people that are color blind can see the color purple.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,501 Posts
Talking to one of the member of a hunting club they have been having trouble for more than a decade with numerous non member ATV riders tearing up their trails to the point the trails are impassable for club member and their families with normal 4 wheelers or hunting going to their stands. The club has put up big heavy iron pipe gates and they are torn down, the groups carry devises to cut their locks. The outlaws drive by and give them the middle finger while they are on their way to destroy the trails riding in the mud and leaving big ruts on the hills which are dangerous.

The club has contacted the local police numerous times and the members are told to warn the riders and ask if they can take their picture and of course they have helmets on and refuse......they just laugh and say you can't do nothing about it. The police tell the members they cannot detain the trespassers or they will be charged with kidnapping.

The club has signs up saying trespassers with be prosecuted.......One person stopped them in the middle of the night and the mob threatened him.

The trespassers have more rights than the owners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,584 Posts
Talking to one of the member of a hunting club they have been having trouble for more than a decade with numerous non member ATV riders tearing up their trails to the point the trails are impassable for club member and their families with normal 4 wheelers or hunting going to their stands. The club has put up big heavy iron pipe gates and they are torn down, the groups carry devises to cut their locks. The outlaws drive by and give them the middle finger while they are on their way to destroy the trails riding in the mud and leaving big ruts on the hills which are dangerous.

The club has contacted the local police numerous times and the members are told to warn the riders and ask if they can take their picture and of course they have helmets on and refuse......they just laugh and say you can't do nothing about it. The police tell the members they cannot detain the trespassers or they will be charged with kidnapping.

The club has signs up saying trespassers with be prosecuted.......One person stopped them in the middle of the night and the mob threatened him.

The trespassers have more rights than the owners.
one farmer i know had problems with neighbors riding horses thru the woods on trails, signs, calling cops, talking with them all did no good. he finally grabbed a chain saw and started dropping the biggest trees around across the trails. he said hunters can walk around them but the horses...not so good...he made a mess...solved the problem
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
443 Posts
one farmer i know had problems with neighbors riding horses thru the woods on trails, signs, calling cops, talking with them all did no good. he finally grabbed a chain saw and started dropping the biggest trees around across the trails. he said hunters can walk around them but the horses...not so good...he made a mess...solved the problem
You shouldn’t have to destroy your property to keep trespassers off it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,368 Posts
The legiscritters need to put some teeth in the law. You can use reasonable non-lethal force to expel trespassers under the crimes code. Which means absolutely nothing when it comes to ATV's. Under the common law, a landowner had the right to seize a horse and or carriage ridden by a trespasser, but could not detain the trespasser.. Where the damage is substantial, such as riding through crops, we have the crime of agricultural vandalism, which under some limited possibilities could be a felony. Felonies give rise to certain citizen's arrest rights. There are however, paint ball markers and even tracking devices that could be attached to the machines. I wonder if there is such a thing as a smell ball marker. Let the guy go home with his machine stinking like a dead skunk. The intensity of stench that makes the eyes water. Guarantee he won't be parking it in an attached garage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,505 Posts
The legiscritters need to put some teeth in the law. You can use reasonable non-lethal force to expel trespassers under the crimes code. Which means absolutely nothing when it comes to ATV's. Under the common law, a landowner had the right to seize a horse and or carriage ridden by a trespasser, but could not detain the trespasser.. Where the damage is substantial, such as riding through crops, we have the crime of agricultural vandalism, which under some limited possibilities could be a felony. Felonies give rise to certain citizen's arrest rights. There are however, paint ball markers and even tracking devices that could be attached to the machines. I wonder if there is such a thing as a smell ball marker. Let the guy go home with his machine stinking like a dead skunk. The intensity of stench that makes the eyes water. Guarantee he won't be parking it in an attached garage.
Hmmmm.....think paintball gun, needle, and skunk oil stink. Inject into paintball. Caution: Wear latex gloves during oil transfer....or plan on sleeping far away from spouse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,728 Posts
After 60+ years of tromping/hunting on our camp property, pretty much know the boundaries. That parcel was part of an uncle's farm before we bought it 50 years ago. Separate parcel from the rest of his dairy farm, so on a separate deed, (Unc got it for back taxes during WWII).

Only one identifiable steel pin, where four properties adjoin, way up in the woods. Been there long before me and every time one of the other properties has changed hands, that pin is freshly flagged from a survey

My Southern most boundary, from the road heading up hill, is a deep gully/fence row, that eventually morphs into just a fence where it hits that steel pin.

From the pin to the NE, edge of a ridge top field (my side is woods); comes to an old stone fence that's another corner to two adjoining properties That stone fence has been there since the 1800s. My line continues NE from that corner as a barbed wire fence in the woods. That same fence continues until it breaks to the left in a straight line to the NW and down to the Twp. road. That fence line hasn't changed by more than a few feet, since the early 1900s. That's how long the family that still owns that land,
has been there.

None of the farmers that have been there for generations, fuss over fence lines. Only people that have bought land around there in the past 30 years, have a hard time figuring out what fence lines are? And it's often caused problem with their new neighbors. All they had to do, was ask.

Couple farmers already had corners and road frontages marked w/purple paint last fall. Some trees, mostly fence posts along the roads. Heckled one of my best friends up there about it last fall, who already had his farm "purpled".

He said it's on the internet. :p
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,501 Posts
Years ago that was a problem as here as a well known bandit family went around putting no trespassing signs of the land of others. The farmers did not spent time to remove them and if you didn't ask you didn't know......I think more people had respect for the rights of others then and didn't ask or hunt there....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,276 Posts
a guy I know told me once that a neighbor of his at his camp , he was a permanent resident , that another camp had their boundaries marked with signs. the neighbor knew they left after Wednesday and asked one of the guys if he could hunt after they left. They guy said "what the sign says is what the sign means." In a little stronger language . The gentleman said ok , he just wanted to ask if it was ok and went home. The guy told me the land owner could have handled it better because his neighbor was a very nice guy and would help anyone out if he could . This was told to ne about 20 years ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,728 Posts
Since farm land near my camp began to be sold off more frequently about 30 years ago, I've seen a few haggles with the new folks. Almost every new neighbor posted their land to the hilt, including interior boundaries. That was never the norm with older land owners that only posted road frontage, if at all?

There are two large dairy operations nearby that don't post at all. They want deer taken to ease the pressure on their corn crops.

Uncle sold about 80 acres of hillside land in 1979, to guys that adjoined it up top, on the Potter side. Posted all their new property and didn't want anyone on it in rifle deer. Locals were used to driving that entire ridge, including the part Unc had sold and it caused a few problems. Couple years in, new boys figured out they got more deer from their tree stands, IF they let that ridge be driven again. All worked out eventually.

What cracks me up, is people that had permission to hunt some properties for years, then eventually bought some of their own in the area and posted it right away. Ever since I started hunting there decades ago, unspoken rule was, hunt your own place opening day or so, then no one cared if we wandered a bit the rest of the season. Some of the newer folks don't want anyone on, at any time. But now and then someone catches them straying.

:rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,721 Posts
City folks move to the country to get away from the city life. First thing they do is bring their city ways with them, and impose them in the country.
"They civilized the foothills
And everywhere he put hills
The mountains and valley below

They come along and take 'em
And civilize and make 'em
A place where no civilized
Person would go"

source: The First Thing You Know Lyrics - Paint Your Wagon Soundtrack Lyrics
 
161 - 180 of 182 Posts
Top