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I brush hogged the power line next to my house this weekend and was wondering if I only sprayed it and then spread turnips on it after the weeds died, would the turnips take or does it need to be rototilled first, the ground does have some pretty good size rocks
I was also going also spread 15-15-15 on it
any input would be great
thanks
 

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Power lines are excellent places to put food plots. For a few years we did clover and corn as food plots very successfully. Our limited experience with turnips did not go well as we put them out and the turnips did very well; however, the deer did not feed on them well. I am told the first year the deer are not familiar with turnips and they don't hit them very well. Perhaps this is true we put out about an acre and almost every one was still in the ground the next spring. We even dug a few up in an attempt to encourage the deer to sample.

I believe this was true with our experience with corn. There is no corn within a deers normal travel area from out plot and consequently, we put out 2 acres of corn early and it produced very well so the coons, groundhogs and crows thought. However, in the Spring we gathered several bushels of corn and brush hogged the remained so we could plant the following year. We planted back the 2 acres of corn again plus an additional plots of 1 acre and 2 acres within 1/2 to 3/4 of a mile and the deer with the help of some other critters devoured the corn; whereas, by the end of January we could not find one ear of corn in any of the patches, the stalks were beaten down lots of deer tracks and many bed downs in the closest cover to the corn plots.

I am no farmer I believe 15-15-15 will work, but for a small fee Penn State will test soil samples you can gather and they will advice the best fertilizer, lime and amounts to use. I believe tilling the plot will loosen the soil to promote growth and the size of the turnips.

Good luck. However if they don't do well the first year you might want to change from turnips or on the other hand perhaps they might be true magnets the second year or even the first?
 

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I would drag the area with an old set of bed springs or something similar after spreading the seed. I've had mixed results by just spreading the seed.


For most of my food plots I usually have good luck with cutting, wait two weeks, spraying, wait two weeks, spreading seed and then drag with an old set of bed springs or something similar. Also spread the seed right before a rain if possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
there is about 300 acres below my property with corn and soybeans
just trying to get the deer to stay away from the main highway
I have planted turnips in my other food plots and they destroy it before they even mature
but I have always tilled it up
this power line has a lot of rocks and don't want to beat my tiller up
 

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I brush hogged the power line next to my house this weekend and was wondering if I only sprayed it and then spread turnips on it after the weeds died, would the turnips take or does it need to be rototilled first, the ground does have some pretty good size rocks
I was also going also spread 15-15-15 on it
any input would be great
thanks
a lot of times they spray right aways with herbicides... found out after i planted on ours
 

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I would drag the area with an old set of bed springs or something similar after spreading the seed. I've had mixed results by just spreading the seed.


For most of my food plots I usually have good luck with cutting, wait two weeks, spraying, wait two weeks, spreading seed and then drag with an old set of bed springs or something similar. Also spread the seed right before a rain if possible.

I like this advice if the seed bed is fairly compacted and rocky. It will allow for improved seed-to-soil contact...and if you can get a nice rain soon after seeding, it will increase your germination success. Brassica seed will do fine on the surface or scratched in if it gets some rain. The nice thing is that it's a hard seed and it will lie and wait for the moisture....not like oats or rye that the birds will start to clean up if it's just lying there on top.
 

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Power lines are excellent places to put food plots. For a few years we did clover and corn as food plots very successfully. Our limited experience with turnips did not go well as we put them out and the turnips did very well; however, the deer did not feed on them well. I am told the first year the deer are not familiar with turnips and they don't hit them very well. Perhaps this is true we put out about an acre and almost every one was still in the ground the next spring. We even dug a few up in an attempt to encourage the deer to sample.

I believe this was true with our experience with corn. There is no corn within a deers normal travel area from out plot and consequently, we put out 2 acres of corn early and it produced very well so the coons, groundhogs and crows thought. However, in the Spring we gathered several bushels of corn and brush hogged the remained so we could plant the following year. We planted back the 2 acres of corn again plus an additional plots of 1 acre and 2 acres within 1/2 to 3/4 of a mile and the deer with the help of some other critters devoured the corn; whereas, by the end of January we could not find one ear of corn in any of the patches, the stalks were beaten down lots of deer tracks and many bed downs in the closest cover to the corn plots.

I am no farmer I believe 15-15-15 will work, but for a small fee Penn State will test soil samples you can gather and they will advice the best fertilizer, lime and amounts to use. I believe tilling the plot will loosen the soil to promote growth and the size of the turnips.

Good luck. However if they don't do well the first year you might want to change from turnips or on the other hand perhaps they might be true magnets the second year or even the first?
Turnips definitely get mixed review from deer herds even within 10-15 miles of each other. It sounds like the OP doesn't have an issue with the deer liking them though! Hopefully the increased acreage with the power line will help alleviate some of the browse pressure.
 

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When we had food plots in the power line right of ways they did not spray those areas with food plots only tall wild growth. They did trim the trees back by helicopter on each side of the right of ways.
 
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