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We just bought a camp that has T1-11 siding. The siding is in good shape but there is some damage from porcupines chewing in a few areas. What can be done to cover this and prevent future damage? It is the kind of place we won’t be able to get into much in the winter once the snow flies. I was thinking of 36” rolled flashing around the perimeter and then painting to match in the spring? I’m looking for something I can do this month to prevent any chewing over the winter. Appreciate any advice!
 

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If you cover the damaged areas the porkies will just start chewing elsewhere. You might want to consider aluminum siding in the spring to cover all the T-11. In the mean time, you can shoot Porkies from Oct 12 to Feb 1. If you see them shoot them
 
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How high do you think I need to go with aluminum if I do the entire perimeter?
Not knowing the layout of your cabin it is hard to say. It has to be to the point where the porkies cannot find a place where they can get a foothold to climb your siding. However, knowing how much damage woodpeckers do to T-11 siding, I would cover the entire cabin with aluminum siding, not living in porcupine country, I do not know if they chew on vinyl siding which is why I said aluminum. I have two friends that live in the woods where I hunt and they have big homes covered in T-11. Both are in the process of having their homes covered in vinyl siding because of woodpeckers.
 

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I have trouble both at the cabin and at home with porcupines. At the cabin they don't bother the cedar siding but they do chew on the treated lumber porches. They also have the aluminum thresholds on both cabin doors chewed. Go figure.
I've also had them chew the nozzle off of my one plastic gas can.
They chew the T1-11 on my house. That's one heck of a noise in the middle of the night.
All guilty porcupines end up dead.

I would maybe try spraying ammonia around the bottom of the T1-11 with a garden sprayer. Maybe even add some cayenne pepper.

Good luck
 

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You could try live trapping with some salty pretzels as bait.
 

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You can spray the siding with any type of cayenne pepper solution. You can make one by mixing a 2 oz container of cayenne in a gallon of rubbing alcohol in a garden sprayer. Cayenne pepper won't dissolve in water. Get the stuff at the dollar store.

IMPORTANT: no open flame, mixture is flammable, but it evaporates quickly. I'm going to go far as to suggest don't have a fire in the stove (although I probably wouldn't follow my own advice here. It's safe if you use common sense). KEEP OUT OF EYES

Apply to siding, should last at least a month.

I've seen porkies eat about everything known to man!
 

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They are destructive little critters.

As WW said, covering the chewed areas will just force them to take their dining elsewhere. I worked for a Scout Camp in NY and spent plenty of time at Elk Lick in Smethport, where I saw some of the damage these little jerks can do. I'm not sure they ever fully fixed the issue, but I know that the latrines at the campsites were ALL chewed up pretty good, and they were patching holes left and right, only to have the Porkies move to another section.
 

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If you cover the damaged areas the porkies will just start chewing elsewhere. You might want to consider aluminum siding in the spring to cover all the T-11. In the mean time, you can shoot Porkies from Oct 12 to Feb 1. If you see them shoot them

I've never seen a forester or surveyor who saw a porcupine and didn't kill it regardless of time of year. Usually with a machete.


I guess when your miles back a secluded forest road or gas line and a porky chews your brake lines, you're probably not too fond of them.
 

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...they will also eventually chew the aluminum...

..solar electric fence...
 
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We've always had lots of porcupines where the camp is, since I can remember as a small boy. Local solution when they got to gnawin' on stuff, was always SSS. Or, as my farmer uncle opined, the only good one is already dead.

Part of our camp is cedar T-111 type siding. They don't seem to bother that much, put the parts that are "regular" T-111 have been chewed, including the door to the front porch storage closet. They nearly chewed thru that years ago, at the bottom.

They always start at the grooves, guess the plywood glue gets their attention? Covered that door at the bottom, with heavy aluminum coil stock, 24" wide. It was brown in color, so good to go. They also gnaw on the PT porch decks, but so do gray squirrels. Squirrels once chewed a redwood picnic table leg off. Table upside down, under a roof out of the weather.

Shed out back and attached to the building, is all T-111. Covered the bottom areas with chicken wire 32" high. So far they haven't chewed the tires on the two Farmall Cubs at camp, but know people who have had implement and tractor tires destroyed at camps.

My solution has been to see 'em, shoot 'em. Working fairly well so far, as damages are now minimal. Only so much you can do to prevent them chewing, when you're not there much?
 

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We just bought a camp that has T1-11 siding. The siding is in good shape but there is some damage from porcupines chewing in a few areas. What can be done to cover this and prevent future damage? It is the kind of place we won’t be able to get into much in the winter once the snow flies. I was thinking of 36” rolled flashing around the perimeter and then painting to match in the spring? I’m looking for something I can do this month to prevent any chewing over the winter. Appreciate any advice!
They don't seem to chew hemlock siding.
I had the same problem with my camp. What I used was aluminum sofet the whole way around to a hight of I believe 30 inches. That was close to 20 years ago and I haven't had any trouble since, but I know others that have had aluminum chewed. You can see it in these two photos.
 

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Porcupines love T1-11 and most other types of wood siding. They will also eat aluminum.

Killing them certainly will prevent that one from eating anymore but that doesn't really solve the problem if you aren't there to shoot the next one too.

What will work, for the most part, is to put up a solar powered electric fence. But you have to make sure it is close enough to the ground the porcupine can't get under or over it and that it isn't getting grounded on something. That is a pretty difficult and perhaps impossible tack where you get varying degrees of snow depth, ice and thawing over the winter.

The other thing that works, to at least some degree, it to salt a stump or two somewhere near the buildings. Try to figure out where the porcupines come from then put salt on a stump between their most likely route and the cabin and other buildings. That way they will be more likely to just sit on the stump chewing it up instead of the buildings. The problem with the salted stump is that it makes a baiting situation near the camp and will prevent hunting deer near it unless you work out a deal with the local Game Warden that allows you to cover the salted stump more than 30 days prior to the hunting season.

You would be well served to call the local Game Commission Office, have the local Warden call you then follow his/her advice.

Dick Bodenhorn
 

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A scout camp I worked at in NJ during the late 90's had a huge problem one year with porcupines basically eating the latrines over the off-season.
Buggers chewed up the walls to about 4' off the ground and at the floor/seats out of 2/3 of them (about a dozen.)
Only solution was SSS during camp setup week and a lot of late hour rebuilding the structures.
They like the salt/mineral content of dried urine.
The ones that saw more frequent cleaning survived longer, but in the end, it's a losing battle.
Didn't make a difference if they were PT lumber or not.
I hate porcupines.
 

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They are also migrating southward in much of PA. While we've always had them up near the NY border area where camp is, never used to see many dead on the road south of Williamsport, until about 30 years ago. 40 years ago, lots of dead ones farther north, like up around Morris, Liberty and Trout Run.

Few years ago I spotted one at our gun club in Cumberland County and TPlank says they're down in his area, south of me.

We already have enough problems with squirrels chewing archery course target frames at our club, didn't need any new gnawers.
 

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They were bad at our camp in clinton co. Between eating siding, our storm door, downspouts etc and the excessive vehicle damage ie brake lines, transmission vacuum lines, radiator hoses we went to war. For a few years we would put chicken wire around the trucks at night. We shot everyone we saw in season for a couple years and set up a solar electric fence as we also have issues with bear scratching our hemlock siding. We have a wire about 6 in off the ground and another a little over 3ft. When there is snow your fence wont be working.
 
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