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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I went knocking this weekend and got permission to hunt 150 acres of a 650 acre non profit land trust. The farmer I got permission from leases the 150 acres and rents a house and barn on the 650 acre farm. But there is a hunting club. The farmer and his family are allowed to hunt the leased land with the hunting club. My farmer wanted to double check if he could give his spot in the club to me because he doesn't have time to hunt. The head of hunting club said absolutely not. My farmer wants me to hunt his land. He already has lost chickens to predators and having problems with ground hogs and deer. My question is being he leases the land and lives there does him saying I can hunt over ride the hunting club? I looked it up and all I found was that if you rent or lease land you your family and regular hired help can hunt without a license if the farm is main source of income which it is. I have a license so that doesn't really apply to me. Then I saw that the same mentioned above can harvest any animal that you see damaging crops livestock. Any help would be appreciated I really want to help this farmer out but don't want to get in any trouble. It's a non profit so the hunting club sounds like a guy and his buddies that got lucky to hunt the land they don't have a lease and I couldn't find anything about the club on the farms website. Like I said I don't want to get in any trouble by hunting but I also don't want to give up helping and the chance to hunt 150 acre spot. I figured I'd ask here before calling game commission and asking. Any advice would be much appreciated sorry for the long question.
 

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You're wasting your time asking here. The farmer appears to own nothing and more than likely, it's probably stated very clearly in the lease agreement as to who can/can't hunt. The head of the club already shot you down so lick your wounds and move on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I THOUGHT maybe someone has gone through a similar situation that's why I asked on here. That's all. Thought that's what you do on here ask questions and discuss hunting. Most hunting clubs pay a lease this one doesn't since my farmer pays to live and farm the land I wasn't sure if that made a difference.
 

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Nothing wrong with your question. Ask away. Many members here with many experiences.....someone may be able to help you. I lease property but do not have an answer for your situation.
 

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Unless there is specific language excluding the farmer's right to grant you permission to use his leased land, there is little the hunting club can do about it at this point.

Since it appears that the Farmer sub-lets the ground from the Club, there will be negative consequences for both of you in the future once the lease is up, if you decide to go against their wishes.

I would be a good boy for now and try to join the club in the future if the hunting is that good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The farmer has nothing to do with the club. When he moved in and leased the land from the board the club was already there. They don't pay a lease like most hunting clubs. So the farmer says he's paying to live there he can allow anyone to hunt his leased ground. I just want to do it the right way that's all.
 

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Curious, what does the hunting club pay or otherwise afford consideration(such as payment in kind etc ) to the Land Trust for their right to hunt the land??
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I believe the hunting club just does chores around the farm like clearing trails and such. They pay no money. The whole farm is part of a non profit trust. So the land stays farm land forever and people donate their land to the trust. So there is a board only paid person is the director.
 

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who actually owns the land? if the hunting club owns the land, I would say that is the final say. If a third party owns the land, leases the hunting rights and leases the land to the farmer, I would check with the actual owner. But if that is the case, I would then check the wording of the actual hunting lease. If that landowner granted exclusive hunting rights to the club only, he might run into a problem in allowing you to hunt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
A third party owns the land. It's a conservation trust. Neither my farmer or the hunting club own the land. I don't believe the club even has a lease. My farmer leases 150 acres and lives on the farm.
 

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Does Hunting Club have a legal agreement with the Land Trust and/or deed holder?? If not, that's where I would start. Obtain permission directly from the actual land owner not the lessee(farmer). I would keep the lessee farmer apprised of this though since he was your initial "foot in the door".
 

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my personal thought would be a bit like shaddartman's: go directly to the paid director and state that farmer Joe has said it is ok with him if it's ok with you and you will stay off of the other land as to not interrupt the paying club member's hunts but Joe has asked for some help keeping things in check on his 150 acres and you would like to help him do just that
 

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If said farmer is OK with the idea I would have him hire you. As his employee you are allowed to hunt to protect his crops and stock. Pay can be in the form of permission to hunt in the off season. I would even help the farmer file for DMAP permits and have them on hand. May even offer some to the hunting club members as an olive branch of sorts. Waugh!
 

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For part time farm work? Just claim a few bucks extra on your taxes when filing. Waugh!
 

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Unless it specifically states in his lease that he can he and others can hunt the 150 acres, and it doesn't sound like it does, it's not the farmers call. It sounds like the club gave him permission to hunt. It isn't up to him to give it to someone else.

The hunting club obviously has some sort of agreement with the landowner or trust and they get to decide who hunts and who doesn't. And they said no.

At this point your only options would be to contact the owner(s) or trust manager or try to join the club.
 

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If the farmer gave you permission to hunt those 150 acres I'd probably hunt it and not worry too much about Mr. Hunting Club, especially since you say the club doesn't have a lease to begin with. If you re really concerned I think you'd be smart to contact the land trust's director too. I'd do my best to avoid a conflict and respect the club's right to hunt there but I'd still go about my business and hunt it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The farmer tried to get me in the club They said its invite only. The hunting club didn't give him permission the board of the trust did. Plus he doesn't need anyone to give him permission the farm is his main source of income he his family and hired help can hunt to prevent damage to crops or animals. Which is why he wants to let me hunt he doesn't have time to deal with it. The farmer is going to speak with the director of the board.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
RyanR said:
If the farmer gave you permission to hunt those 150 acres I'd probably hunt it and not worry too much about Mr. Hunting Club, especially since you say the club doesn't have a lease to begin with. I'd do my best to avoid a conflict and respect their right to hunt there but I'd still go about my business and hunt it.
I just wanted to make sure I can't get in any trouble for doing so. Right now he's having problems with ground hogs digging up stuff and fox trying to get his chickens. I just want to be by the book and do things the right way that's all.
 
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