The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I really want to get into the muzzleloading game and was thinking about trying to put together a kit from Pecatonica Longrifles. I was wondering if anyone had any experience with any of these kits and if so how easy or difficult they are to assemble? More specifically I was looking at the Bedford style longrifle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,550 Posts
My dad built four for us "boys" and one for himself. They are all great shooters. It would be very helpful to have Chuck Dixons book or the gunsmith of Grenville County to help guide you. It it also helpful to have a knowledgeable person who has built a few to answer any questions and help with the oops that pop up.If you are near Kempton , Dixons muzzleloading shop is a great resource.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
These are not kits like the TC's or Lymans. They are a collection of the correct parts to assemble a fairly PC longrifle. Lots of inletting to be done, drilling and tapping holes and dovetailing barrels. They are a very reputable dealer as is Jim Chambers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,528 Posts
Kits come in various forms, (1) a bag of parts and a plank, (2) parts with some finisheing and a precarved stock, (3) partially assembled and (4) assembled in the white in working order, needing only the wood and mmetal finished. If you are just starting out, it can be really tough without an incredible amount of patience and study. A bag of parts and a plank, can easily take a year of spare time. Even assembled in the white can take several weeks to finish properly. By all means buy Chuck Dixon's Book. It is the best guide I have ever seen.

Many people don't realize the patience and work that goes into doing a good job. It is far too easy to take $600 dollars in parts and make a $300 gun. having a gun worth more than the sum of the parts takes seemingly forever the first time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,380 Posts
I purchased a Pecatonica stock and a buddy with more skills than I put it on my rifle. It took a fair amount of extra shaping and inletting in his woodshop...not a beginner's task for me. That being said, I enjoyed dealing with the fellow I met at the event, and he took a very personal approach to the transaction. Even though he had decent stocks on hand at the event, he knew he had some extra nice cherry blanks about to be worked back home, so I waited an extra 2-3 weeks and he shipped it to me no extra charge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
As others already said, the "kits" you get from professional suppliers are intended for advanced gun assemblers, they are not the snap-together kits as offered by Lyman, T/C & Traditions. A fair amount of inletting, shaping and finishing work is required. I agree with Zimm too, I've seen a lot of $600-$1000 "kits" turned into guns worth $300 or less. Personally, I find working from a kit is sometimes more time consuming than scratch building depending on the quality of the kit as a whole as well as the individual parts it contains. Also keep in mind that when dealing with a kit, more often than not you do not have the ability to choose options such as; buttplate, thimbles, lock, trigger, barrel, ect.

The wisdom phrase I stress to my clients is: "Invest Wisely". Get what you really want instead of something you may not be completely happy with.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top