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I have several pear trees on my property and the deer seem to love the pears, The trees produce small sour pears. What is the real name of these trees? my father always called them crab pears, but doing a google search really didnt come up with anything. thanks
 

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The vast majority of pears in the United States are cultivars of the European Pear, Pyrus communis. Which cultivar your pear is is hard to tell. Your pear doesn't sound like any of the modern common cultivars. It may be a hybrid or just a long lost cultivar. When you say small, how small are you talking?
 

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Seckel is small, but about as sweet as a pear gets! They ripen fairly early in the season as do most pears compared to apples... It's hard to tell. Take a picture of the fruit and leaves if you can, that may help out.
 

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Hey guys.. I think that I have the same kind of pear trees on my property. I also need help identifying them. I have pictures of them but for some reason I don't think I can post them on here from my blackberry. If you want to see them or if you can post the pics for me.. Please drop me an email at [email protected] and I will forward the pics to you. I'm pretty sure its the same tree.
 

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Could just be a pear grown from seed. To my knowledge some pears are self fertile some arent. I am assuming they are the same as apples and those that arent self fertile grown from seed would be different than the orgiginal pear, same could be true for self fertile if they picked up some other pollen. Could be where the term crab pear came from too. A lot of people call seedling apples crab apples.
 

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This is a seedling Siberian pear that St. Lawrence Nursery sells. It's described as being extremely hardy, with an astringent fruit and the tree has thorns. Sounds like the tree that you are describing. Does your tree have thorns??? They are often used as a rootstock for grafted trees, so your trees are probably wild seedlings.
 
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