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Discussion Starter #1
Every inch of sheetrock in my house was wallpapered by the original owner without the benefit of sizing being used. So I can't get the paper off without ruining the rock surface. Every time I paint the paper has a tendency to bubble up even though several coats of paint have been applied over the years. In some closet areas the original wallpaper has never been painted over and I am getting ready to paint them. What can I put on the wallpaper to seal it so that the paint does not make it bubble up? BTW, one of my neighbors had the same problem and he solved it by ripping out all the existing sheetrock and putting in new.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ya' know what Ron - I was just thinking of that and kind of along the lines of T-111 or maybe venere cedar.
 

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The bubbling is from the water in the paint getting thru and softening the paste. A shellac based sealer/primer like KILZ will do the job for you. Drys fast and you can paint like an hour later. Don't use water based primer
 

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I ran into the same problem in one room when I bought my house. The paint guy at Home Depot told me to use an oil based paint. I did and it worked great.
 

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We ran into the same problem at our house and here's what finally worked for us (God bless my late mother in law for this tip): We rented a steamer. First use one of those circular wallpaper scoring tools. Heat up the steamer and use about a cup of cider vinegar in the water. Sometimes the paper backing will stick and you'll have to use the steamer again in some areas. Once you have the wallpaper and backing off off, wipe the plaster down with the cider vinegar/water mix. It works best if the water is warm. Then wipe down with clean water twice. If they is any paste residue left, it will have a slimy feel when you wipe it down. Just go over that area again with the cider vinegar/water mix and rinse with clear water.

For whatever it's worth, I'd like to find the guy who invented wallpaper and get him in a dark alley for a few minutes. It wouldn't be pretty.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hi Wax, and thanks for the recco. However, thst does not work becasue the original wallpaper application was applied without the benifit of a pre-coating of sizing and any attempt to remove the wallpaper causes the paper covering on the sheet rock to disintegrate and tear up ther rock itself. I have used the method you described about 40 years ago and it worked great. That was on lath and plaster walls and in some places the paper was actually (no joke) a solid quarter of an inch thick... If you find the mutt that invented wallpaper please save a piece of him for me
 

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Sorry that didn't work for you JD. Our house was built in the late 60's and the plaster underneath also had no sizing, but was in pretty good shape otherwise. I can see where if the plaster was in bad shape that the steaming would be a bad idea. It's nice to know that there's someone else out there who hates wallpaper as much as I do.

When we did our kitchen (before the vinegar trick), it was a freakin' disaster. Gouges everywhere. We hired a guy (Harold the "Plaster Master.") He tried to patch the gouges in the wall, and I think he made a worse mess than we had. I nicknamed him Harold the "Plaster Disaster." All I can say is I feel your pain.

One thing we did, after we patched the best we could, was use a relatively flat finish paint (flat or low luster satin if I remember correctly) to hide the imperfections. That having been said, I still get irritated sometimes when I look at those kitchen walls.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
When we moved in the wallpaper in our livingroom was red, and I mean bright red. The previous owners were vampires. Anyhow, the red even bled through Kilz paint so I ended up putting a skim coat of joint compound over all four walls and what a PITA it was too!. Now, I could do that process again but frankly I am 25 years older and besides; the joint compound application tended to make the wallpaper bubble up in places and that in itself was madening. I am getting the place fixed up as well as I can because I am on a path to sell it in a couple of years and move into something smaller and hopefully in the northeren PA area. Well, that's the plan anyhow....
 

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the very best solution is for you to remove the paper and paint the torn areas of the drywall with guardz. then get some midweight joint compound. You need midweight because it does not shrink alot. thin the mud down and roll it on and pull it tight with a 16'' knife. it will give you a smooth wall with a skimmed finish level higher than 5. you could literally use a high gloss paint your walls will be so smooth
 
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