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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Let's stir the pot a little bit. What does everyone think about reverse draw crossbows for a hunting rig? Positives and negatives.
 

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Re: Opinion on RD crossbowsh

The only true negatives I see to the design is the very acute string able which can contribute to serving separation. Also, the riser being mid barrel can get in the way during the cocking stroke for those using rope cockers.

As for positives, there are many. There is more weight to the rear instead of up front. The limbs will be parallel or past parallel resulting in less noise and vibration. The power stroke can be lengthened while still keeping the overall length down. For treestand hunting, the limb location and movement is easier to work around trunks when shooting. They can achieve more speed with less poundage because the design is efficient. Plus, they look cool, IMO.

Those are some that I see as being the biggest positives and negatives.
 

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Re: Opinion on RD crossbowsh

Dave2pa said:
I was told if the limbs break the pieces COULD come back at you ??
That is a common misconception. I have not seen any instances of this occurring. If they exist, it is no higher than folks getting hit by broken strings or other parts on conventional crossbows.

The limbs on reverse draws are usually pretty close to parallel. The forces go out to the sides instead of forward or backward.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Re: Opinion on RD crossbowsh

I'm gonna agree with a few of the positives. First efficient due to long power stroke. Since the weight is back they are balanced. They do look cool. Let's here from some more people and I'll give some things I think might be negatives or might not be what most would think.
 

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Re: Opinion on RD crossbowsh

Jason Zimmerman said:
First efficient due to long power stroke.
Let's talk power stroke. The reverse draw design allows for a longer power stroke without increasing the overall length of the bow. Longer power stokes allow for more speed with less limb weight.

But, long power strokes are much more difficult to cock for some people. I do not like power strokes over 16 inches because of this. Some of the reverse draws have power strokes around 18 inches.

I would prefer a reverse draw with 150lb limbs , a 15 inch power stroke which shortens the bow and makes it easier to cock, and shoots around 360fps with a 410 grain arrow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Re: Opinion on RD crossbowsh

Axle to axle listed for most of these bows doesn't give u a real idea of how wide they are. Those big cams add 3-4 inches to the width.
 

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Re: Opinion on RD crossbowsh

They definitely have some advantages to using that are already mentioned. I prefer the look of a traditional bow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Re: Opinion on RD crossbowsh

Ok. Quiet. Yes some reverse draw crossbows are a little quieter. All reverse draw crossbows are not quiet. Went back in the indoor range at the local pro show to shoot a scorpyd Orion with 150 limbs and when I pulled the trigger the two guys working the counter came back looking around. They said is that you making all that noise,I thought they(reverse draw crossbows) were supposed to be quiet.
 

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Re: Opinion on RD crossbowsh

I have been hunting with a crossbow since their inclusion to the archery season,the last 3 seasons with a Horton Havoc 175 reverse draw bow.The balance,compact design and just a solid thump when fired have sold me on RDT bows.I am now trying not to handle the new Horton/Ten Point Storm RDX,I like my havoc too much!! jeff
 

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Re: Opinion on RD crossbowsh

The Storm RDX I shot at the ATA show was 74 db on my meter. The noise of the show itself was getting into the mid 50's at times. Some of the most quiet conventional and past parallel limb design crossbows are reading as low as 84 db.

Reverse draw and past parallel limb crossbows are very efficient. They seem to be very easy on the system. They work well at lower poundages and create less stress and vibration on the entire system.

The negatives as I see them are serving separation and the possibility for limb twist/cam lean. Drawing any limb system past parallel creates it's own set of issues. I think a lot of those issues have been solved. There are a lot of the reverse draw and past parallel crossbow limb systems out there at this point. The imported models seem to be the ones that are having issues. There is a difference between copying a design and engineering a design.
 

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Re: Opinion on RD crossbowsh

Jason Zimmerman said:
Ok. Quiet. Yes some reverse draw crossbows are a little quieter. All reverse draw crossbows are not quiet. Went back in the indoor range at the local pro show to shoot a scorpyd Orion with 150 limbs and when I pulled the trigger the two guys working the counter came back looking around. They said is that you making all that noise,I thought they(reverse draw crossbows) were supposed to be quiet.
Quiet is relative. All crossbows are loud.
On average, reverse draws are quieter than conventionally limbed bows. The old Horton Vision 175 was the quietest crossbow I ever shot. It was close to many vertical bows.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Re: Opinion on RD crossbowsh

I have a friend that hunted down a vision because he loved how quiet it was. This was after everyone was wondering what would happen with Horton. My scorpyd was way louder that my ten point though.
 
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