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It states, west of Scranton. Probably 1000 miles west I'm sure. The eastern elk was extinct by then and the Rocky Mountain elk was not was not introduced until 1913.
 

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Pa.Bone, really like the archery drive photos. In the second photo I think that's an old set of binoculars around his neck.
This type of camo is exactly something that my Dad would wear. Brings back great memories.

Does anyone remember in the 70's a person nicknamed "slim" who lived down near kettle creek? He used to whistle and the deer would come running from great distances and he would give them bread. I have a picture of him and will need to post a photo of it.
 

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Yep I remember seeing Slim. He's whistle and the deer would come in and he'd feed them bread. I have a picture also of him some where. They said during deer season all you could hear where hunters whistling around that area trying to call in a deer.
 

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Laylow said:
Yep I remember seeing Slim. He's whistle and the deer would come in and he'd feed them bread. I have a picture also of him some where. They said during deer season all you could hear where hunters whistling around that area trying to call in a deer.
Its great that you remember. When I was a tot, Dad used to take us to watch slim feed the deer bread. We did not have deer in the city back then and this was a really enjoyable for me. I can still remember him whistling in a piebald 8 pointer. Back in the 70's that was a big buck for that area. Lol on the hunters whistling.
 

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I have a picture of Slim in my Man Cave. He is holding a piece of bread feeding a doe and hey did a hoof to hand handshake. You can still get those photos in Galeton at the antique store on Rt 6.
 

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I know I'm late to the party, but thanks for the upload, those were some really cool glimpses into the long lost days of America. Wish I could have seen it with my own eyes
 

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kswiggy said:
I have a picture of Slim in my Man Cave. He is holding a piece of bread feeding a doe and hey did a hoof to hand handshake. You can still get those photos in Galeton at the antique store on Rt 6.
Is that the Bittersweet store? I am going to check it out. thx.
 

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For many, the "good old days" are right now.

When I was a kid in the 1950s, my Potter uncles often talked about hunting deer in the "teens" and 1920s, when they'd find a deer track and follow it for days, hoping to get a shot at a deer. Wasn't much better by the 1930s.

Should strike some that many of the old hunting photos show dozens of hunters posing and maybe two to a half dozen dead deer? Now and then there are lots of deer on those "olden days" meat poles, depending on the area.

Deer are now found almost everywhere in PA, unlike back in the days represented by most of those old pics.
 

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grousechaser said:
Hemry27,
I love the Allegheny National Forest pic! If you wouldn't mind, I'd love to have you post it and any other old ANF photos you might have at my Facebook page:
www.facebook.com/ASeasonontheAllegheny

By the way, I see we share the same hometown. I grew up on Doyle Road in Sarver. My dad still lives there, in fact.
Thanks. Ill check your page. Im sure we know alot of the same people! My in laws are on Parker Rd. Im over by the Golf Course.
 

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I really enjoyed these old photographs especially the ones from PA. Wish there more of them published. Lots of history and memories that need to be passed on to the next generation.
 

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My Grandma , 1972. New Mexico record for 1972, 16 1/2"
Grandpa dropped her off on a knoll,drove the jeep out of sight and got stuck in the mud. She shot the antelope 10 minutes after he left. He was pretty upset he missed it all. Mount was the only one EVER allowed in the house. All his were in the garage.

Grandpa butchering his last elk in the late 80's in New Mexico, he was in his late 70's. Very successful hunt as 4 guys got 3 cow elk
 

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This one is from my area, not Pa, but still pretty interesting. These old timers were tough and they played by their own rules.

Noah John Rondeau
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Noah John Rondeau (July 6, 1883 – August 24, 1967) was a widely known hermit in the High Peaks of the Adirondack Mountains of New York State.

Biography
He was born on July 6, 1883 and raised near Au Sable Forks, New York with many siblings by his parents Peter Rondeau (b. Canada) and Alice "Allie" Corrow Rondeau (b. New York, d. May 1900, Black Brook, New York),[1] but ran away from home as a teenager several months after the death of his mother. He only obtained an eighth-grade education yet was quite well read, with a strong interest in astronomy. Before distancing himself too far from civilization, he lived in Coreys, New York, on the Raquette River in the western Adirondacks, where for fifteen years he worked as a handyman, caretaker, and guide. He gained some of his knowledge of the woods from Dan Emmett, an Abenaki Indian from Canada. He also made occasional brief visits to jail for game law violations.

Rondeau frequently hunted and trapped in the Cold River area, about 17 miles from Corey’s, and in 1929, at age 46, he began living alone year-round in the remote area, saying he was "not well satisfied with the world and its trends," and calling himself the "Mayor of Cold River City (Population 1)."

He kept extensive journals over a period of several decades, many of which were written in letter-substitution ciphers of his own invention. The ciphers progressed through at least three major revisions in the late thirties and early forties and in its final form resisted all efforts to be deciphered until 1992 (Life With Noah, p. 91).

Although he was considered an Adirondack hermit, he normally accepted visitors to his hermitage and even performed for them on his violin.

During World War II, in his sixties, Rondeau was apparently suspected of being a draft dodger, as he submitted a letter dated 4/8/43 to the Ausable Forks Record-Post:

I never went to Cold River to dodge anything, unless it was from 1930 to 1940 when it might be said I dodged the American labor failure at which time I could not get enough in civilization to get along even as well as I could at Cold River under hard circumstances in the back woods. Since I'm not evading I did not make my first appearance at Cold River on the day that Pearl Harbor was bombed. What I'm doing toward the war effort looks like nothing, but that's all I can do and I'm doing it and it is this -- I'm self sustained.
In 1947, Rondeau was flown to the National Sportsmen's Show in New York City by helicopter, starting a series of appearances at similar shows throughout the country.

In 1950, the New York State Conservation Department closed the Cold River area to the public after a “big blow” leveled the forest, forcing Rondeau from his home at age 67. He then lived around Lake Placid, Saranac Lake, and Wilmington, New York. Besides the sportsmen's shows, he worked for a time at Frontiertown and at the North Pole in Wilmington as a substitute Santa Claus, but he didn’t return to a hermit's life and eventually went on welfare. He was buried in North Elba Cemetery, near Lake Placid, with a stone from his Cold River home marking his grave.[2]
 

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Recommended reading Noah John Rondeau, Adirondack Hermit by Maitland C. DeSormo published by NorthCountry Books Utica NY


Lots of pictures too! Spent a few hunting seasons stumbling around the Cold River where Rondeau had his camp..quite an interesting fellow. I tried posting this the other day but to no avail...back in business now.


Bill if you want the book I can send it to you.
 
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