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Discussion Starter #1
The title to this post is a double entendre.

1. I got to fish yesterday with a friend (Matt) that I have known for 25 years. He and I have always pushed each other in everything we did. Competition in fishing has always been fierce. Out of the hundreds of times we fished together growing up, there was never a time when we didn't finish a day within 5 trout of each other. Before the internet and the availability of information, we became very proficient at bait fishing for trout. After college, he moved to DC and only gets after trout once or twice a year now. He has completely missed my evolution into a spinner fisherman. This was the first time he came with me and exclusively fished spinners.

2. Thanks to the ample rainfall, I had my pick of any stream that I would ever fish. I chose a stream that I have been fishing, since I have been fishing. In the last few years, I have had some great days on certain reaches of this stream. There are also some long stretches of water where I have had poor results for the better part of 2 decades. There were some loooong stretches of this stream that I have never fished because of its proximity to the unproductive parts. Today we hit one of those sections.

Wanting to get some fish on the board right away and look like a successful guide, I started us with two tributaries to the main stream. Matt had the casting accuracy down as well as any veteran spin fisherman (he does a lot of perch fishing nowadays with trout fishing gear). We covered water with lightning speed with 2 people casting. We finished both tributary streams covering a total of 2miles in 4 hours. Some very nice wild fish came to hand from these small streams.









Around 10am, we ate lunch and moved vehicles into position to fish a 2 mile section of the main stream.

The water was up nicely and in the slower sections, it was stained to a point that it looked muddy. You can see the perfect coloration below.



This stream section was much better than anticipated. Most fish that came to hand for both of us were wild browns which came in all age classes.




Starting here, at the first beaver dam we encountered, the fishing became awesome, but the wading became awful.


For the next 1 mile, a series of dams kept the stream bottom very muddy and the water very deep. Unfortunately, the streamside vegetation consisted of nothing by thick alders, so we had to stay in the water. Sometimes, we were in water just shy of armpit height. The trout were plentiful so it was do-able.

Just above the dam shown above, I had a big hit on my first cast. The 2nd unsuccessful cast brought the beast of a fish out of the depths to let me see that it was a big rainbow. We fished upstream and not a minute after my encounter with the big bow, he was "sipping" insects off the surface. I walked back down, waited til it sipped again, watched it sink back down into the murkey depths, and made a cast. I let the spinner sink a few feet down before cranking it, and as soon as the blade started churning, the big bow slammed it. Matt slid off the muddy bank to help land the 20.5" rainbow.



There were no other pictures taken in the productive beaver dam section because we were really struggling just to wade.

Finally we got back onto solid ground.

Coincidently, the soles on both of Matt's tennis shoes fell off here. He must have a very even walking pattern. At this point he was basically walking in slippers. I should have taken a picture.


The trout were slightly less abundant here, but still kept us busy. I liked the big bold spots on this brown.


And just because I can, I caught ANOTHER golden rainbow. This fish whiffed on the first pass of Matt's spinner. Then it hid from my spinner. Since I am not too proud to go to any length to catch an interesting fish, I tied on a trout magnet that I keep with me for occasions like this. I drifted it right to the GR and he chomped down on the first cast.


The last trout of the day was a Cyclops.

It looks as if there may have never even been an eye on this side, or it was a very old injury. (After proofreading my post, I noticed that you CAN see Matt's shoe slippers in this picture. They look odd without bottoms, kind of like rock climbing shoes.)

While waiting for Matt to catch up (he was having a hard time in his slippers), I caught a strong odor of gingerbread along the stream coming from blooms on this small tree.

I have smelled this a few times in the last couple outings but haven't stopped to investigate its source til now. Maybe somebody knows what type of tree this is???

In all, we had a great day ending with just shy of 200 trout between us over 8.5 hours. Matt finally bought into spinner fishing and just needs to work on his hookset.
 

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Your pace is unreal. I feel like I move fast (as proven by my numerous annual plunges haha) but 2 miles in 4 hours, even on a small stream, is break neck speed. Enjoy it now cause when you're 40 lol.............

Congrats on the great day so late in the year.
 

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2 questions after re-reading your post. The long pants. What's your rationale behind that? I haven't noticed that you wet wade in long pants before? In thinking about it it's really not a bad idea and something my may consider for abrasion resistance. In the past I've worn really long socks for this.

Second, are those beaver toast this winter????????
 

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Trout 2003 said:
2 questions after re-reading your post. The long pants. What's your rationale behind that? I haven't noticed that you wet wade in long pants before? In thinking about it it's really not a bad idea and something my may consider for abrasion resistance. In the past I've worn really long socks for this.

Second, are those beaver toast this winter????????
I went fishing yesterday with a friend and he wore long pants wading. I had never thought of wearing pants when wet wading, only shorts. I haven't wet waded in years because I don't like to have my legs unprotected. Now I'm going to get a pair of wading pants for the summer. It's so much cooler and it saves wear and tear on my waders for the rest of the year.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have learned my lesson with short pants one too many times. The main reason is for protection against Nettle. Many streams around here are lined with Nettle and its sting can last for hours. I usually wear berkley wading pants. They dry almost instantly. I got them on sale at Wal Mart for $10 a few years ago. I need a darker pair. I also wear lightweight running pants sometimes.

I do cover ground fast. I do a rock hopping/jogging thing as often as I can between fishable spots. This was learned fishing with my brother and my friend while growing up. We always raced from hole to hole. Not to mention small stream bowfishing (without a line connected to the arrow) where it is often necessary to sprint up and down the stream to retrieve carp.

The beavers will be safe until fur prices bounce back. I will keep after the mink to protect my trout fishing interests and then pursue coyotes/bobcats on land. If you have noticed more and more beavers the last 2 years, that is why. Prices will be down the next few years so beaver populations will likely increase significantly.
 

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I really like the first photo with the two trout.

That's a really pretty hawg rainbow, too.

Did Matt catch within five trout of you? I'm guessing not a chance this time.

I tried to look up that tree/shrub but had no luck. The blossoms are unique so it really shouldn't be that difficult, but I had no luck.

Very good day. I would have walked around the beaver dam area, which is probably what other people do, which is probably why you caught so many trout there.

Thanks for sharing the outing.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Matt has a great camera, so you can tell which pictures he took. And no, I caught about twice as many as Matt did that day. I sent him home with a dozen spinners and he was happy. I encountered the same tree with those gingerbread smelling flowers again today. They seem to only grow very near the water.

There are quite a few wild rainbows in this stream, so I guess there is a chance that big rainbow was wild or had been holding over for a while.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I am the worst person to ask about rod/reel combos, unless you are a cheapskate like me. I currently and using a 5'6" gander mountain guide series that has been broken a few times and is now a few inches under 5'. It actually has a great feel to it now with the tip section missing. Even when it was brand new, the $40 gander mountain rod felt much better than the $120 St Croix trout series I tried. I do use a decent reel for $40, the shimano sedona 1000fd. It has a 6:1 gear ratio and these reels have been lasting me around 150 fishing trips each. I am in the process of converting my cabelas bass rod into a trout rod because I can't afford to lose any more length on my gander mountain rod.

I use Korker's Redside wading boots. They last about 100 - 150 trips . I have purchased 2 pairs and never paid more than $89. You just have to be vigilant for online sales and check the bargain cave at Cabelas. The felt bottoms are a lifesaver, just make sure to disinfect them after each stream.
 

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For the limited amount of time I fish, I too chose to go with the Shimano Sedona, but mine is the 2000 series (is it 2500 ?) and goes on my bigger St. Croix Wild River. I fish the Yough mostly, so go with a larger outfit... better to control the river torrents.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I carry a bottle of chlorox and a small, flat bottomed plastic container. I throw the felt soles in there and shut the lid. They sit in there til I get to the next stream. I usually only fish 1 stream each day so I can do it at home.

And yes, I upsize my tackle on that river too. I still lose quite a few fish that steer themselves into the rapids or around boulders.
 

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AHA ! I think I've discovered why you caught so much more than your old friend. You gave him a "faux" spinner. In the first pic, the guy with the brown has a red bead gold spinner. The guy with the brook has the dreaded and world renowned white bead gold spinner. YOU CHEATED.
 

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troutdoorsman said:
There are quite a few wild rainbows in this stream, so I guess there is a chance that big rainbow was wild or had been holding over for a while.
The hawg rainbow trout, though a very beautiful fish, is definitely a stockie. The shape of the tail gives it away without a doubt.
 

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troutdoorsman said:
While waiting for Matt to catch up (he was having a hard time in his slippers), I caught a strong odor of gingerbread along the stream coming from blooms on this small tree.

I have smelled this a few times in the last couple outings but haven't stopped to investigate its source til now. Maybe somebody knows what type of tree this is???
I asked my brother-in-law, who has a master's degree in horticulture, and he said this shrub is abelia.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks Frank!

I have done a lot of searching online and even asked some DCNR park naturalists. From what I just read about abelia, they must be garden escapees.
 

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troutdoorsman said:
I carry a bottle of chlorox and a small, flat bottomed plastic container. I throw the felt soles in there and shut the lid. They sit in there til I get to the next stream. I usually only fish 1 stream each day so I can do it at home.

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Prolonged explosure to bleach will ruin your wading boots in short order.

No need to soak...

I never felt the need to treat my felts - no rock snot in streams I fish...
 
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