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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can you recommend a book? I am always feeling lost at what I am looking at. It would be nice to have something with color pictures to help me identify oaks or other hunting positive trees.

Any good books that you guys use?
 

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turkey4life said:
threeinchmag said:
:eek:What's that?


It's a good book.
the book is fine i just couldnt figure out why you would need a book to tell what an oak looked like. then i thought and now ive got it figured out he probably wants to tell one type of oak from another.
You purty schmart there, Grasshopper.
 

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Dutch said:
turkey4life said:
threeinchmag said:
:eek:What's that?


It's a good book.
the book is fine i just couldnt figure out why you would need a book to tell what an oak looked like. then i thought and now ive got it figured out he probably wants to tell one type of oak from another.
You purty schmart there, Grasshopper.
yes unless he realy doesnt know what an oak tree looks like.
 

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Take dendrology at Penn State... It worked for me!

However I like the Peterson Field Guide Series. It doesn't have pictures, but paintings and drawings. If you aren't quite as technical, the paintings may be less helpful.
 

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sch Co said:
Yes, I do what I an oak tree looks. What I don;t know is the difference between red,white,swamp, etc..

Thanks for the replies
Well to start the leaf shapes are quite different, growth habit, shape, size, bark color and texture, fruit size.
 

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A good one is William Harlow's "Trees of the Eastern U.S. and Canada". If it is still in print, it is a small field guide of 288 pages. Lots for photos of leaves, twigs, bark, flowers and fruit. Also has a lot of tree uses, folk uses and trivia.

A faily basic one, but you can usually get it for free from your local service forester (at least in NY) is "Important Trees of the Eastern United States". Has drawings rather than photos, but the price is right.
 

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Dutch said:
turkey4life said:
threeinchmag said:
:eek:What's that?


It's a good book.
the book is fine i just couldnt figure out why you would need a book to tell what an oak looked like. then i thought and now ive got it figured out he probably wants to tell one type of oak from another.
You purty schmart there, Grasshopper.
Oh boy!!
 

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sch Co said:
Can you recommend a book? I am always feeling lost at what I am looking at. It would be nice to have something with color pictures to help me identify oaks or other hunting positive trees.

Any good books that you guys use?
I'll second The Audubon Society Guide to Trees Eastern Region.

Otherwise, you could just go to yahoo search, go to images and type in the tree your looking for.

A simple tip to tell the difference between Red and White Oak is to look at the leaves. White Oak leaves will be round lobed. Red Oak leaves will be larger and have round lobes but have a little sticker at the end of each lobe. Also, White Oak acorns are about half the size as Red Oak acorns.

If you know what a shagbark Hickory looks like, a White Oak will closely resemble it's bark many times.

To tell the difference between Red Oak and Black Oak, look at the bark near the base of the tree. Red Oaks bark will be uniform from the base all the way up the tree. Black Oak will have 'alligator' bark near the base of the tree then will resemble Red Oak further up.

Pin Oaks and Scarlet Oaks will have thinner lobes on their leaves and the Lobes will cut in close to the stem. Also, they will have many more small branches all the way up the tree.


Once you get the hang of it, it will be second nature telling the difference between oaks.
 

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Actually a chestnut oak's leaves don't look much like a chestnut. I prefer the other common name for chestnut oaks, the rock oak... Fits the tree better, as most rock oaks are found on rocky hillsides... Now if they called sawtooth oak chestnut oak, they'd have given it an accurate name.
 
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