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Discussion Starter #1
...if the fishing was distracting me from my photography, or if my photography was distracting me from my fishing. You see, I really enjoy photographing flowing water (obsessive my wife says), however typically the light is only good for 30 minutes to an hour tops right after sunrise. Today however, the light was perfect almost all morning...so I had to split the time!

I had to resort to another mountain stream this morning, hopefully Thursday I can get back to some bigger water. The stream was up, which also added to the photography, and took a little away from fishing. I managed to scrape together 41 trout, all on my beetle pattern...a mix of natives, wild browns, 2 holdover bows from March (the only time they stocked rainbows supposedly), and a holdover brown. Enjoy the pictures:

Stop #1 for pics at daylight:

24-0022 by Jason Weller, on Flickr

Streamside Rhododendron by Jason Weller, on Flickr

...and a trout:

Brown 2 by Jason Weller, on Flickr

more pics:

22-0042 by Jason Weller, on Flickr

27-0010 by Jason Weller, on Flickr

more trout:

Brown 1 by Jason Weller, on Flickr

Brookie 4 by Jason Weller, on Flickr

Holdover Brown by Jason Weller, on Flickr

Wild Brown by Jason Weller, on Flickr

See the dilemma?

16-0105 by Jason Weller, on Flickr

23-0038 by Jason Weller, on Flickr

Brookie 2 by Jason Weller, on Flickr

Rainbow by Jason Weller, on Flickr

Brookie 4 by Jason Weller, on Flickr

Rainbow (creamtone) by Jason Weller, on Flickr

19-0063 by Jason Weller, on Flickr

Picnic Area by Jason Weller, on Flickr
 

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I can see your dilemma. I'll tell you what though, if your're going to have an obsession I can't think of a better one.

Again, your photos are stunning.

I'm just in the beginning stage of learning how to take photos of flowing water on long exposures. Heck, just last weekend I used the manual setting on my camera for the first time, so I think that shows you where I am on the learning curve.

I find it interesting that you dropped the hint that taking photos like yours has a short, low-light window of opportunity each day. That's great advice. The reason I say this is because I took my first long exposure stream shots last weekend on a cloudy day, but it was still fairly bright out. With my camera, a Nikon 1 V2, the longest exposure I could get without total over-exposure was 2" at f-16. Part of this could be that my camera/lens has limitations or/and that I don't know how to do it yet. However, with that said I will now try it out sometime right at daybreak. It will be tough to do because I'm usually reeling in wild trout at that time.

Would I be correct to assume that there's a short window of opportunity at dusk as well as at daybreak? If so, is it as good as the window at daybreak?

Do you care to share what lens you used for those photos?

Thanks for your help.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
FrankTroutAngler said:
I can see your dilemma. I'll tell you what though, if your're going to have an obsession I can't think of a better one.

Again, your photos are stunning.

I'm just in the beginning stage of learning how to take photos of flowing water on long exposures. Heck, just last weekend I used the manual setting on my camera for the first time, so I think that shows you where I am on the learning curve.

I find it interesting that you dropped the hint that taking photos like yours has a short, low-light window of opportunity each day. That's great advice. The reason I say this is because I took my first long exposure stream shots last weekend on a cloudy day, but it was still fairly bright out. With my camera, a Nikon 1 V2, the longest exposure I could get without total over-exposure was 2" at f-16. Part of this could be that my camera/lens has limitations or/and that I don't know how to do it yet. However, with that said I will now try it out sometime right at daybreak. It will be tough to do because I'm usually reeling in wild trout at that time.

Would I be correct to assume that there's a short window of opportunity at dusk as well as at daybreak? If so, is it as good as the window at daybreak?

Do you care to share what lens you used for those photos?

Thanks for your help.
I can honestly I never tried at dusk, but yes I would assume the window is short (there's usually a good spinner fall at dusk! I can trick myself into thinking missing a few minutes of fishing in the morning is OK since I have all day to fish, but in the evening the fishing day is over!) The light may even be softer as the sunsets, I might have to try it now...

I was using the AF-S Nikor 18-55 lens, with a polarizng filter. There are a lot of expensive filters out there that allow you to get these shots all day long, I just can't afford them so I shoot in the morning or on cloudy/rainy days.

I am far from an expert, I have been teaching myself all of this stuff, experimenting, etc...I hope this helps.
 

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grousedog20 said:
FrankTroutAngler said:
I can see your dilemma. I'll tell you what though, if your're going to have an obsession I can't think of a better one.

Again, your photos are stunning.

I'm just in the beginning stage of learning how to take photos of flowing water on long exposures. Heck, just last weekend I used the manual setting on my camera for the first time, so I think that shows you where I am on the learning curve.

I find it interesting that you dropped the hint that taking photos like yours has a short, low-light window of opportunity each day. That's great advice. The reason I say this is because I took my first long exposure stream shots last weekend on a cloudy day, but it was still fairly bright out. With my camera, a Nikon 1 V2, the longest exposure I could get without total over-exposure was 2" at f-16. Part of this could be that my camera/lens has limitations or/and that I don't know how to do it yet. However, with that said I will now try it out sometime right at daybreak. It will be tough to do because I'm usually reeling in wild trout at that time.

Would I be correct to assume that there's a short window of opportunity at dusk as well as at daybreak? If so, is it as good as the window at daybreak?

Do you care to share what lens you used for those photos?

Thanks for your help.
I can honestly I never tried at dusk, but yes I would assume the window is short (there's usually a good spinner fall at dusk! I can trick myself into thinking missing a few minutes of fishing in the morning is OK since I have all day to fish, but in the evening the fishing day is over!) The light may even be softer as the sunsets, I might have to try it now...

I was using the AF-S Nikor 18-55 lens, with a polarizng filter. There are a lot of expensive filters out there that allow you to get these shots all day long, I just can't afford them so I shoot in the morning or on cloudy/rainy days.

I am far from an expert, I have been teaching myself all of this stuff, experimenting, etc...I hope this helps.
What is the normal exposure time on those stream pics? All your photos are fantastic , by the way. Thanks for sharing with us.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
[/quote]
What is the normal exposure time on those stream pics? All your photos are fantastic , by the way. Thanks for sharing with us. [/quote]

These varied between 30 seconds and 6 seconds. I like to do 30" whenever possible for flowing water, but the light may dictate otherwise.
 

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What is the normal exposure time on those stream pics? All your photos are fantastic , by the way. Thanks for sharing with us.[/QUOTE]

These varied between 30 seconds and 6 seconds. I like to do 30" whenever possible for flowing water, but the light may dictate otherwise. [/quote]

A stable platform is required for those exposure times isn't it?
 

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Great pics. I fish this stream all the time as we have a camp near by. This is the first year I can ever remember rainbows being stocked in 20+ years. And they typically do not stock Browns to my knowledge, usually just brookies. Last fall, I was after a very nice brown trout (about 20" which is a true trophy for this stream), in the very deep hole near where some of your pics were taken. Never got him to bite though.
 
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