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So I just bought a RCBS rockchucker from the classifieds here and have never reloaded before. I ordered 2 books from Amazon that everyone recomends here so they'll be here in a week or so probably, but I'd like to start buying supplies now. The main calibers I'm going to reload are 6mm remington, 38 special and 45 acp. I have the dies for the 6mm already and ordered the 38 and 45 dies. My questions mainly relate to choosing powder and bullets.

I found some pistol and rifle powders online that the manufacturers have load data for. They list load data for specific bullet brands, types, and weights. Can I safely assume that I can just buy the pistol powder and order any bullet of that grain and the load would be the same?

For the pistol rounds, I was going to shoot cast bullets because I mainly just plink in my backyard with them. I was looking and found some ramshot true blue powder for sale for pistols. Thier load data has loads listed for types and weights of bullets for this powder. So can I apply that load data to a cast bullet of the same weight?

The same question also applies to my 6mm. Can I buy Accurate 2700 powder and then buy any different kind of bullet for my 6mm and then just apply the load data for that bullet weight to the bullet I bought?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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I hope the books you order on amazon are reloading manuals. One tip is, take loads that people tell you on the internet with a grain of salt.

If your bullet is a 100gr hollow point and the manual only lists charges for 100gr soft point, you can use that same charge. As long as the bullet is the same grain then you can use the same load data. The type of bullet doesn't really matter if they are the same grain. Just remember if you have a poly tipped bullet then your C.O.A.L may be off, from a soft point bullet.

Not all powders work for all cartridges.

Just read you manuals, double check yourself and your work. Always be checking your lengths on your cases and on the loaded round.
 

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Bullet to bullet is usually OK if the same weight...I try to find something really similar though....a copper solid is going to be a longer bullet than a lead bullet for example...which can cause pressure spikes...


ALWAYS start on the low side of manuals!! Every gun and load is different...I've saw pressure signs with loads a fair bit less than the book max...different primer, different brass, tight chamber, different seating length etc all change pressure...

A bullet seated deeper will have a higher pressure than one seated longer...think of the lands in your barrel as a speed bump...


Follow the manuals and start off on the lower side and work your way up...start your seating at book specs or magazine length if needed...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yeah I ordered the ABC's of reloading and a reloading manual. Thanks for the advice.
 

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stroker97 said:
The type of bullet doesn't really matter if they are the same grain.
Disagree, you cannot load a 115 gr FMJ RN the same as a 115gr cast RN bullet. Cast bullets need to be loaded different in order to keep the velocity below XXX (depends on the lead hardness).

Buy a hornady/speer/lyman/sierra loading book. This will help immensely.
 

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mauser06 said:
A bullet seated deeper will have a higher pressure than one seated longer...think of the lands in your barrel as a speed bump...
Maybe so in certain handguns but not so in rifles....here's an excerpt from a Hornady narrative regarding internal ballistics:

"To illustrate the effects of variations in bullet travel before the bullet enters the rifling, we'll compare a standard load with adjustments made only in the bullet's seating depth.

In a "normal" load with the bullet seated to allow about one 32nd of an inch gap (A) between the bullet and the initial contact with the rifling, pressure builds very smoothly and steadily even as the bullet takes the rifling. Pressure remains safe throughout the powder burning period (B), and the velocity obtained - 3500 fps - is "normal" for this load in this rifle.

Seating the bullet deeper to allow more travel before it takes the rifling, as in these next two illustrations, permits the bullet to get a good running start (C). Powder gases quickly have more room in which to expand without resistance, and their pressure thus never reaches the "normal" level. Nor does the velocity; with the same powder charge it only comes to 3400 fps (D).

When the bullet is seated to touch the rifling, as in the accompanying illustrations, it does not move when the pressure is low (E); and not having a good run at the rifling as did the other bullets, it takes greatly increased pressure to force it into the rifling. As the rapidly expanding gases now find less room than they should have at this time in their burning, the pressure rise under these conditions is both rapid and excessive (F). Velocity is high at 3650 fps - but at the expense of rather dangerous pressure. Many rifles deliver their best groups when bullets are seated just touching the rifling. Seating bullets thus can be done quite safely if the reloader will reduce his charge by a few grains. The lighter load will still produce the "normal" velocity without excessive pressure. "


All this being said, pressures will also depend largely upon the size of the combustion chamber in your rifle. IOW, if you have a long throat that exta volume at the long leade will be a part of the equation that dictates pressures so you have to use the prologue "All other things being equal....................."
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Hmmm learn something new every day! Thanx Bob! They are saying the opposite of what I thought I read!

Either way, seating depth can change the pressure generated...
 

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I agree with Wrangler on the pistol bullets. A jacketed Bullet can be pushed alot faster than a cast one depending on the hardness. In my .44 I can push jacked bullets over 1300 fps but my lead semi-wadcutters are kept under 1000 fps. You definitely don't want to lead up the barrel!
 

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Wrangler, thank you, I was in a hurry to send the post. I neglected the cast bullet part. And I'm even a cast bullet castor. Lol
 
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