The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,691 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
being a fan of the old rem pumps, especially carbines, i picked up an old, tired 14R in 30 rem about 10 years ago. it had seen better days. mechanically good but the wood had some cracks, the buttplate was loose and the metal had been stripped of all blue at some point. i stuck it in the safe for years and decided to revive it this winter. being as how it had been drilled and tapped on top and sides, and its condition, i figured it was not going to be a collector gun. i had my gunsmith hotblue it and i did the wood myself. i used acraglass on the cracks and redrilled the buttplate holes and put dowells in to rebuild the screw holes. i used acraglass on the pump handle and rebuilt a pretty serious crack in the underside of it. after taking off the remainder of the old wood finish with light sandpaper and a light touch, i made up a 50/50 blend of waterbased walnut and mahogany stains til i got it looking pretty close to original. after a few coats of that i used about 7-8 coats of truoil with steel wool in between. then i used the birchwood casey stock conditioner to take the gloss off and make it a satin finish like original. all in all it came out really good and i am very pleased with the results. wood to metal fit is great and the old metal took the hotblue really nice. the gun didn't need any buffing so the lettering is still sharp and crisp. after i got it put back together, i took it out back and put about 10 shots into a fist sized group at 50 yards with the irons. this little old pump made in 1927 and rebuilt in 2013 is ready for another generation or two.

this is a before shot of it on top along with some of its brothers. 14R's in 30 and 35 and 141R in 32.



and after a rebuild



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,194 Posts
Real nice job indeed. Now I uderstand your "handle" and it fits! Question, if I may, what is the stone marker for that is seen just beyond the green bench?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,691 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
i have a cemetary in my yard and the occupants don't seem to mind the gunfire. i live kind of rural.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,770 Posts
Thats stone belongs to the last neighbor that made a noise complaint! Very nice job on the gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
763 Posts
Off target here but can you hunt in your yard. And if you ever want to get rid on one PLEASE let me know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,691 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
thanks guys. interesting story about the cemetary in my yard. a whole family died the same time. old isaac was born in 1785 and him and his family died of something in aug 1855. that stone you see is from the 30's and was put up by his relatives. the original are field stone and granite. they make good neighbors.

and '06kid, yes i hunt in my yard. i own part of an old christmas tree farm and keep the local critters under control. and if i ever go to sell one of my oldtimers, i'll offer it here first. might happen one of these days because i have been on a s&w kick lately and they ain't cheap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,177 Posts
That looks super!
Question for you. How does the forearm wood come off? I refinished my buttstock, but, to me, it's not obvious how to remove the forestock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,691 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
the forearm requires that you pull the action tube. not hard, but not obvious. if you want to do it, i suggest you find a copy of a model 14 or 141 takedown guide. you can find them online and remington used to send them to you for free. theres a few tricks to it but i'm no gunsmith and i was able to break mine down and put it back together.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,691 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
it was pretty pricey, $150. it used to cost about half that. the reason was because the cost of the bluing materials went from $50 to $300 according to my gunsmith. he had it for a while waiting for other jobs to come in so he could do a bunch at once but didn't get as many as he wanted. it was more than i expected but still worth it. it came out really nice. the bad part is he said he may not do any more blue jobs due to the cost of materials. i have an old beat up model 141 35 rifle that i was going to get him to cut down to 18.5" and do a blue job on it and i was going to do the wood like this one. i may wait until next fall when he has a bunch more to do, if he does it again.

heres a couple more pic's in progress

this is the pump handle after i acraglassed the crack. these old pumps have a tendency to crack underneath where the wood is thin. i bedded it real good with acraglass and sanded it smooth and then coated the whole thing in stain and truoil, inside and out so it ought to be good for another 86 years.



and here's a shot of the buttstock after its final coat of stain and before i started the truoil coats. i acraglassed all the cracks and built up the tang area inside a bit and then stained and truoiled inside and out. i left the dings and little nooks and crannies from the last 86 years.



i love these old pumps. for those that aren't familiar with them, they are the predecessor to the modern 7600. the model 14 came first from 1912-1935, then the 141 from 36-50 or so. then the 760, 6 and finally the 7600 of today. out of all of them, i find the old 14R carbines to be the handiest. the 18.5" barrel and straight english stock make it ideal for carrying in the woods. the rifle length is nice too but i much prefer the carbines. i take at least one of them out every year in deer season if the weather is nice. love my old pumpguns.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top