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Discussion Starter #1
They debuted the RDT 165 at the ATA show. Shoots a 400 grain arrow at 425fps.
Saw a pic of it, supposed to retail for $1300 but looks big and heavy. Their RDT 125 which debuted last year is moving alot of units with its reverse limb technology and fast speeds.
 

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I shot the 125 last fall.It was heavy a little in itself but balanced better than the other one's I've shot.It shot through the chrony at exactly 350 fps.
 

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Would like to shoot one... They do look pretty big and heavy.
 

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I spent a good deal of time at the Scorpyd booth yesterday. I had some good conversation with one of his reps and talked briefly with Jim Kempf. All a great bunch of people. It looks like we will be offering the Scorpyd very shortly.
I agree that they looked to be big and heavy, from the pictures I have seen. I can say that they are better in real life, than in the photos. They balance so well that the weight they do have seems to be alot less than it actually is. A very unique crossbow and I hope to have them in the store shortly.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The reverse limbs make a world of difference on crossbows. I haven't held a Scorpyd yet but the Vision felt great in hand.
 

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Held a Scorpyd myself yesterday..I was very comfortable and not too heavy. Seemed very well balanced. I will be shooting it as well as a bow by New Breed next week. I may purchase the Scorpyd. Its a hefty price tag IMO, but if the wife and kids get out and use it, its well worth it.
 

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CBB, You are probably referring to the RDT-125 model. It is lighter than the new RDT-165. The speed that the RDT 165 is capable of is amazing. It will launch a 400 grain arrow at 425 f.p.s. but it does come with some added weight. It uses solid limbs where the 125's use a split limb and a new system of attaching the buss cables to the limbs.
 

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I have the Rdt-125 and i have shot alot of different crossbows and it is by far the MOST Quiet! and least TWANG. i never shot one that even comes close to as nice as feel as it has. its not real heavy, i would say just average in weight. you can go wrong with a Scorpyd they sure are nice bows! Good luck to everyone this year! Keep after em!
 

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I stopped in a local shop a few weeks ago with the hopes of shooting one. They had one on the rack, but were waiting on a new cable for it. The shop owner told me he'd been waiting for that cable for 4 months. Needless to say he wasn't real impressed with their customer service. He told me unless they could get their ducks in a row fast, it would be the last one in his shop.
 

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Why wouldn't he have just made a cable or contacted a string builder and had one made? It sure would be better than waiting four months.
 

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Is the main purpose of the reverse limbs to move more weight towards the stock and balance things out, or is there a speed benefit as well?

My Parkers are advanced enough and deadly for me, but I like to follow the trends and solutions they come up with.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The main benefit is to move the center of gravity rearward which gives a much better balance to the bow. Crossbows are notoriously front heavy but the Horton Vision and Scorpyd are a dream to hold.

Also, with the limbs of these bows being close to parallel, shock and noise are much reduced. The quietest bows I have shot were both reverse limb. There are advantages when one has a tree to contend with. The shooting radius with reverse limbs is a bit better.

Time will tell if this is the wave of the future.
 

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The large cams of the Scorpyd also help to dampen vibration and add speed. They get more f.p.s. out of a 125 lb. bow than Horton gets at 175 lbs. I liked the Scorpyd. It balances very well and is a very nice shooting bow. It is a little heavier than some of the other bows I have shot. That being said, it does try to "right" itself if you tip the limbs to the right or left. It has to do with the position of the limbs and the center balance point. They also feature 2.5 lb trigger pull.
 

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I would be worried if anything happened to the string or cables , them limbs might fly back and hit you , I think I'll stick with my reg. croosbow till I hear more about these
 

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Actually, the limbs of a reverse limb bow; if broken would most likely fly away from the user or towards the barrel. The design of the limbs is such that any broken parts would fly out or in. (depending on if the bowstring is on the latch or not)

A conventional crossbow is designed so that a broken limb would actually come at the user or away from him. (again depending of if the bowstring is on the latch or not)

The conventional crossbow with parallel limbs would be the safest. The Parker Tornado or Cyclone is a good example of this style bow.
 

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At the ATA show I noticed they were using the Victory arrows. Through our testing we discovered the Victory also. It seems we both hit the same arrow at about the same time. The Victory should fly great in that bow, and we can build them.

Your Stryker test arrows should be in the mail later this coming week. Provided my jig for the aluminum nocks gets finished.
 
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