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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an old flintlock I would like to sell however, I don't know what to ask for it. Maybe just a wall hanger or maybe someone could get some use out of it. I will describe it to the best of my ability. The name on the side is "A. Waters" along with "Millbury", 1833. There is also a "CBC" and a "S" stamped on the gun. Total length is 57.5" and barrel length is 40.75". The bore appears to be approx 5/8". The hammer and pan are missing but the stock has no cracks and the ram rod is still with the gun. It would be great if some one could actually hunt with it after some rehab. I will try to post pictures shortly. Thank you in advance for any assistance you may provide.
 

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Cool,
do you have any shots of the markings? If so put them on the ALR forum. If they can't help you chances are that they will steer you in the right direction, that and it looks like a cap lock not a flinter
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Here's what I found so far...
Civil War 1833 dated Millbury Musket, marked also A. Waters U.S. this was an 1833 Flint Lock, converted to a <u>Percussion</u> (thanks brewyak) for use in the Civil War. The lock plate is dated 1833 and marked "Millbury A. Waters U.S. " Good condition guns are selling for $1,350.00. This gun is far from that. lol.
 

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What I believe you have is a typical US Contract Musket manufatured by Asa Waters of the Waters Armoury in Millbury MA. Waters started the armoury in the 1820's I think but he had been manufacturing contract muskets since before the War of 1812 with Whitmore in Sutton MA. Here is a link to a history of the Waters family:

http://www.gunandswordcollector.com/Templates/articles/10_asa_waters.html

The gun was converted prior to the Civil War and probably at the Sprinfield Armoury but possibly by Waters. These guns were built to mimic the Harpers Ferry Muskets of the 1816 period. The contracts were commissioned by the Federal Govt. to arm the Volunteer Militia's of the early Federal Republic. These guns were pretty cheap and there were many lawsuits about them in the period. Nathanial Starr of CT. was another manufactureer at the same time as Waters.

You value in that condition is about $500 to $600 dollars. Good news is that the parts are still around and you could probably find them cheaply nearly doubling your value.

Hope this helps,

GBJ
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you for the info and link Grey Bear! Very interesting. So, if they were cheaply made I'm not so sure I'd like to shoot it.
However, I would like to attempt to restore it if I can find parts. First thing I have to do is drill and EZ-out the broke off bolt in the hammer action square stock. Do you think its hardened?
Thanks again to all who posted info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
mfwing82 said:
Start by soaking with pb blaster then try a left handed drill bit that should back it right out
I will give that a try. Thanks!

I ran the ram rod down the barrel yesterday and maybe its me but it sure feels awful "soft" at the bottom. I'm anxious to see if its actualy still loaded. I dont want to damage the ball with an extractor if it is so... compressed air at the cap nipple ought to do the trick, no?

Also, when I put the ram rod in its slot under the barrel it sticks past the end of barrel about 3-4". The threads on the end seem to get stuck in the wood stock and make it difficult to remove. Probably not the rod meant for this gun? Would it be wise to cut it to fit or find one that was made for it?

Thanks for all the help.
When it comes to Black Powder Long Guns I have zero experience.
 

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I was going to comment on the rod sticking out so far. You're probably correct in saying it's not the correct rod, but not because it "sticks". The extra length is more of an indicator. As far as cutting the rod, NO. That may be a "period" rod from another gun, and could be in demand (as much as rods could be I guess). It would be sad to see a possible restoration artifact ruined in such a way.
 
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