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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So besides a free ride to a major division University, these kids get to haul in money to sell their image and likeness and even hire an agent to drum up potential suitors.
While they are playing their sport of choice, now they have to make time to manage their potential wealth, market themselves, meet with potential representatives whom may want to sign them, etc. etc...
When do they go to school?
 

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Eight! You funny! To quote that Great American Philospher Cardale Jones, in regard to the academic program at Thee Ohio State University.....

"We come here to play ball, we don't come here to play no school."

The NCAA is obsolete and useless. Instead of getting in front of this, they just punted.

So now those 5-star recruits will be making huge money from boosters to sign autographs at the local Hooters.

Coulda devised a fair system to not exploit kids but still had some barriers to cheating. Not now.

Boats n Hoes for everyone!
 

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You obviously haven't seen some of these college athletes that get a free ride in college give a post game interview. Most can't put together a sentence that makes any sense and this is after 12 years of elementary,Junior High, High School and 4 years of college.
 

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...we'll see the stats by the end of the year of how many of the 500,000 NCAA student-athletes actually get "sponsored".
 

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Free ride 🤣
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If you ever saw the NCAA commercial that says only 2% of collegiate athletes make it to the pro level then they divert to actual ex-athletes who become architects, doctors, business owners, etc.. etc...
So now, if you have a large twitter, Tik-Tok or Instagram following, you may be approached by a company to brand their product on your social media platform and that equates to dollars for you.
So, does an athlete who may have left college in their 2nd or 3rd year stay in school to maximize their earnings if they feel that they will not do better in the pro arena especially if they are not a top prospect ? I can totally see an athlete staying in school if they are not a top round pic instead of getting lost on some practice squad or g-league making the minimum.
At the end of the day, it ratifies that these kids ( and their parents) were never about getting a good "free" education but instead using their kids excellence in high school sports to garner them some kind of wealth. Now that wealth is coming in different modes.
Education is still at the bottom of their want list that's for sure.
 

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There's a business owner in Miami, a rabid fan of the 'Canes, who said he'll pay every football player on the team $500 to promote his pizza joints (or whatever it is that he has) on their social media accounts.

So a kid Tweets "Eat at Julio's" and presto, he fulfilled his end of the deal. Rich boosters will run amok. Think Oregon players will be touting Nike and getting a similar deal?

NCAA really blew this one. It was obvious the old system was not going to stand up in court. But they could have come up with something better than "here, just have at it".
 

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If you ever saw the NCAA commercial that says only 2% of collegiate athletes make it to the pro level then they divert to actual ex-athletes who become architects, doctors, business owners, etc.. etc...
So now, if you have a large twitter, Tik-Tok or Instagram following, you may be approached by a company to brand their product on your social media platform and that equates to dollars for you.
So, does an athlete who may have left college in their 2nd or 3rd year stay in school to maximize their earnings if they feel that they will not do better in the pro arena especially if they are not a top prospect ? I can totally see an athlete staying in school if they are not a top round pic instead of getting lost on some practice squad or g-league making the minimum.
At the end of the day, it ratifies that these kids ( and their parents) were never about getting a good "free" education but instead using their kids excellence in high school sports to garner them some kind of wealth. Now that wealth is coming in different modes.
Education is still at the bottom of their want list that's for sure.
With a take like that I don't think I'd be speculating about where anyone else is putting education on their want list. If a young person can use their talents and NIL to figure out a way to make money and put themselves in a position for a better future that's a person that is figuring out what it means to be a successful adult. D1 athletes on scholarship are recruited to provide their elite athletic talents for the school's benefit. In return for their labor they are compensated via scholarship. It is not a "free education." The NCAA should not be able to tell any student athlete what they can or cannot make outside of actually playing their sport, certainly not when the NCAA is making millions off of their labor.
 

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Thats a good take right there. Maybe "billions" instead of millions when you add in the conference-specific TV networks.

I do think the "just have at it" approach will bring some problems. Had the NCAA not been so cloistered in their gilded ivory tower, they could have engaged student athletes, financial people, event pro sports agents to try to devise a system in which the right-to-earn and such is not hindered but also blatant "cheating" is curtailed.

Maybe like an agent, any business that wants to hire an athlete to promote their ice tea, their pizza shop, whatever, needs to register with the NCAA. Not saying to reveal who or how much they pay, just identify that they are in the game.

Or possibly that the money goes into a trust fund until eligibility expires. The athlete can use so much per month, or if their family is needy it can go to them.

Just ideas. I am sure the people involved could have come up with something that everyone could agree with. But right now there is nothing stopping a rich booster to tell a recruit go to Ball So Hard University, and a bag of cash will be waiting for those autographed jerseys and pictures, wink wink.

Like the Miami booster. He'll pay every Cane football player $500 a month to promote his business on social media. Kid makes one Tweet, five Benjamins. Don't think that was the intent.

Monied boosters are going to "buy" players left and right. Forget your Boise States and Cincinnatis in college football. They have even less of a chance now.

But with all the potential for abuse, good for the young athletes. Lot of people got rich off of them and while the education is very valuable, it was not a fair tradeoff, especially in the big money TV sports.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
With a take like that I don't think I'd be speculating about where anyone else is putting education on their want list. If a young person can use their talents and NIL to figure out a way to make money and put themselves in a position for a better future that's a person that is figuring out what it means to be a successful adult. D1 athletes on scholarship are recruited to provide their elite athletic talents for the school's benefit. In return for their labor they are compensated via scholarship. It is not a "free education." The NCAA should not be able to tell any student athlete what they can or cannot make outside of actually playing their sport, certainly not when the NCAA is making millions off of their labor.
I have seen too many "athletes" go broke after their "career" was over. The large majority of them had spent and invested their money irresponsibility and ended up poor with nothing to fall back on. There is nothing second to a good education and a degree that can help in obtaining one to a good job and steady employment. Too many student athletes go pro without their degree thus having achieved nothing in the way of an education.
As I have been taught, "You can give a fish to someone and they will live for the day, teach them how to fish and they will live a lifetime"....
 

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For the football programs anyway I always felt the Collages/Universities should get compensated for any rostered player going into the NFL by the teams or agents taking the player.
Football uses the colligate programs as their minor league and farm teams and some of the talent step in ready to making immediate contributions to the team thanks to the training and conditioning the schools provided.
Even if they only reimburse 100% of the full ride scholarship money that the schools put out that equals a sizable chunk of change.
Its also not right for a program to build around incoming students then have them sign with the pro's after 2 seasons and land fat contracts while the school deals with making a plan B or C for the following season.
That scholarship money should be the responsibility of the student athlete to pay back.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I truly believe that the meaning of a scholarship has gotten lost over time.
Money and power have tainted what was once a young persons dream of attending a university to play their favorite sport and in exchange to receive an education.
Again mankind has ruined a special thing.
If you want to see an example of what a true scholarship means to a young person watch the Netflix movie "Greater". It is a true story.
 

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I have seen too many "athletes" go broke after their "career" was over. The large majority of them had spent and invested their money irresponsibility and ended up poor with nothing to fall back on. There is nothing second to a good education and a degree that can help in obtaining one to a good job and steady employment. Too many student athletes go pro without their degree thus having achieved nothing in the way of an education.
As I have been taught, "You can give a fish to someone and they will live for the day, teach them how to fish and they will live a lifetime"....
Those are individual mistakes and not every college athlete is going to make them but regardless that is not a valid reason to say "no you can't make money because you might not handle your finances well." Meanwhile the NCAA is making money off of them. Guess what they're in college and can take finance classes while there if they choose. Also pro sports are now addressing responsible finance and investing with young pros as they enter the leagues. And your premise was that if a college athlete figures out a way to make money thru NIL deals then that means education was not their priority. What about college students that build start-ups and then sell them for big $$. Education not a priority either then eh? You go to college to learn and set yourself up for a better future. If you can use your NIL to do so that isn't that part of becoming successful?

And this whole notion that if an athlete turns pro or makes money from NIL they need to pay back their scholarship is such a one-sided, narrow view. It's a false notion. The scholarship is already repaid by the athlete competeting for the college.

Man, many of your comments on athletes just seem to reek of some kind of jealousy or anger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Man, many of your comments on athletes just seem to reek of some kind of jealousy or anger.
Ryan,
Maybe a little angry. I have been in the system for quite a while. I guess I have just seen too much carnage along the way.
 

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Ryan R "And this whole notion that if an athlete turns pro or makes money from NIL they need to pay back their scholarship is such a one-sided, narrow view. It's a false notion. The scholarship is already repaid by the athlete competeting for the college.

Man, many of your comments on athletes just seem to reek of some kind of jealousy or anger. "



I have no problem with anyone being paid for their talents but athletes who sign commitment letters to play receiving scholarship money should have to fulfil their commitment to the program.
There has been backdoor ways these kids got spending money forever, right back to when a Chevy dealership gave Kenny Stabler a new vet to ride around in when he played for Bama.
Let the kids play for a farm team, which the NFL does not have if they want to be paid while improving their play.
If you want to shop for the best deal do it before you commit, don't have others come to a collage because of you and be stuck with a mediocre program when you bail.
 

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Well what is fulfilling their commitment to their program? Allowing the NCAA, university and conference to profit off the achievements of you and your teammates while you are there? Boom, done. Already happens.

Honestly I'm not even sure what your argument is now?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I actually like the way D3 schools do it.
They are precluded from giving "athletic" scholarships and instead give merit or academic based help with tuition.
So, it is far easier for an athlete to make it onto a D1 program then say a D3 program if your academics from high school had to be factored in.
Furthermore, some D3 schools require you to "try-out" each year for a spot on the team.
They can do it that way cause technically, the "athlete" is on an "academic" scholarship and not an "athletic" scholarship.
The athlete got into that school for his brains first and his talents second....
How many of us have seen an interview with some of these D1 football players where you could hardly make out what the heck they were saying.....
 

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My son played D2 baseball, I just wish he could hit a curveball😂. Anyway he graduated in 1999 and has a great job in medical sales. He received about 10,000 a year for sports and academics.
 

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I actually like the way D3 schools do it.
They are precluded from giving "athletic" scholarships and instead give merit or academic based help with tuition.
Good point there Eight, but its not completely pure either.

First, beyond D1 hoops and football which are "headcount" scholarships (its a full ride or nothing), every other sport has a maximum number of "full time equivalent" scholarships that is far less than the number of athletes on that roster. You understand that but most don't.

So for everything else besides big time hoops and football, much more non-athletic dollars.

My one daughter played D3 softball at a powerhouse athletic program in the OAC. Her cost to attend a more expensive private university was a wash with going to some of the D2 PSAC schools who had less sticker price tuition and could toss in $1500 athletic money.

All merit and academics. On paper the merit was one thing, but being a really darn good defensive 3B with a nice bat was the real merit. They find ways.

The more you win in all sports, the happier the alums who cut checks. The facilities were pretty sweet for a small school. Someone paid for all that. Better not have any teams at the bottom of conference standings!
 

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A good friend of mine got a 75% scholarship to play football at U of Penn. The Ivy League supposedly does not give athletic scholarships but they do give academic $. He was a sharp guy who is doing great, but I’m sure there are plenty of kids who are smarter that payed full rate!
 
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