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OP, I know how you feel. Just nature working as designed though.
Besides predation being how nature works there is frequently no way of knowing if the fawn was killed by the predator or simply scavenged after dying of natural causes.

Studies have shown that a high percentage of fawns, ranging from 12.2% to 92.9% depending on the winter and spring food supply for the doe, that die of malnutrition from being born under weight within the first few days of life. That means even in the best of habitat and environmental conditions about 12.2% of the fawns will die of natural causes before predation even becomes a factor. That natural death rate increases to as high as 92.9% as the habitat and/or winter/spring environmental conditions decline.

With those high natural fawn mortality rates just finding the remains of dead fawn doesn't really mean the fawn was killed instead of just eaten by the predator who found it.

Even during the fawn mortality studies it was possible to assume a fawn died from predation when in fact it may well have died from natural causes then just eaten by one of several different predators. Having been on some of those mortality investigations I can attest to the fact it was often hard to say for sure.

Dick Bodenhorn
 

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lately i have seen does without fawns. they could be there, hiding ?, but i havent seen them even when the doe is feeding in a small soybean field.
Though some of the fawns are now traveling with the does some of the time we don't start doing our wildlife survey routes until the first week of August for the specific reason of that being about as early in the year that you can be pretty sure even the late born fawns will be traveling with the does.

Right now many and maybe even most of the fawns will be with the does sometimes but also sometimes hidden on their own.

Dick Bodenhorn
 

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A couple days ago, a car was stopped on the road, a woman was kneeling on the side of road with a blanket, could see her distraught and crying. A few minutes passed and the husband pulled up so I could get past. I asked him what happened , did a fawn get hit. He said no, just laying on side of road. I grabbed some rubber gloves, jumped out and did only thing I could think of. Grabbed the fawn ( actually squirmed out of grip and stumbled half on His feet ) I caught him and took him back in the woods, found a rotted down tree and layed him next to it and sort of " bunkered " him in with more rotted logs and smeared some of the moss on him and left. I checked on him 2 hours later and then right before dark. Never even flinched when i got close. The next am went back and he was gone. No fur, blood , signs of struggle ect. This is the burbs so biggest predator would be fox or dog and closest house was at least half mile. You think he made it ? was he just big enough to try to follow mom across rd. and gassed out or was he abandoned. No sign of mom being hit by car and no crows or buzzards along road. The wife keeps asking and I tell her he's fine lol , just a little ornery and didn't stay put .
 

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Seeing lots of fawns this year, both at our gun club in 5A and up at camp in 3A. Last several springs have been banner years for fawns up at camp. That and less hunting pressure, are why we have more deer up there now, than we had prior to HR starting.

We've had triplets at our club for the past three or four years. Finally got to see mama last summer. Didn't think we'd see triplets again, as it was mid July? Then one late afternoon as I was leaving and driving up the long driveway thru the woods, mom and two fawns ran across in front of me. Seconds later, along came #3. Was surprised how small the doe was, for having three fawns. Someone else had seen her with the fawns a year earlier and also commented that mom was fairly small.

The problem with changes in concurrent seasons, isn't with the "science". It's with the knuckleheads deciding on such changes and that is not the deer management team biologists.
 

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A couple days ago, a car was stopped on the road, a woman was kneeling on the side of road with a blanket, could see her distraught and crying. A few minutes passed and the husband pulled up so I could get past. I asked him what happened , did a fawn get hit. He said no, just laying on side of road. I grabbed some rubber gloves, jumped out and did only thing I could think of. Grabbed the fawn ( actually squirmed out of grip and stumbled half on His feet ) I caught him and took him back in the woods, found a rotted down tree and layed him next to it and sort of " bunkered " him in with more rotted logs and smeared some of the moss on him and left. I checked on him 2 hours later and then right before dark. Never even flinched when i got close. The next am went back and he was gone. No fur, blood , signs of struggle ect. This is the burbs so biggest predator would be fox or dog and closest house was at least half mile. You think he made it ? was he just big enough to try to follow mom across rd. and gassed out or was he abandoned. No sign of mom being hit by car and no crows or buzzards along road. The wife keeps asking and I tell her he's fine lol , just a little ornery and didn't stay put .
What you did was the correct thing to do and the fawn will be as fine as nature allows it to be.

I have watched many fawns lay down on the road when they saw a car or a person approaching. The strategy to just drop and stay still is instinctive to a fawn in the face of danger, even if they aren't hidden at all. When small they will usually simply lay there and allow themselves to be run over or eaten if that is what was going to happen. Once the threat is gone they will get up and move again.

Some people still believe that human scent on the fawn, or other animal, will prevent the mother from taking it back. That just isn't true. The wildlife mother will not abandon her young because of human scent on it.

The best advice is to just leave wildlife alone. But, as in this instance, when it is on the road or other place of danger there is absolutely nothing wrong with stepping in, removing it from danger and putting it a short distance away to be separated from the immediate threat.

Dick Bodenhorn
 

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Besides predation being how nature works there is frequently no way of knowing if the fawn was killed by the predator or simply scavenged after dying of natural causes.

I know many ranchers who would call me to come out and kill the coyotes that are killing their cattle. What they would tell me is "I saw a coyote eating one of my calves." What they saw in fact was a coyote scavenging on a calf that had died from other causes.
 
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