The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,211 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I am getting used to my bike and enjoying the heck out of it. I got a Diamondback hybrid in April and I could not even do a mile on the thing but kept after it and last weekend I did a 30 mile ride. It killed my butt in a major way. Now, just yesterday, I found out that there are padded shorts that are made and I wish I had known this 2 months ago. Would have saved a lot of pain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,314 Posts
LOL! Chamois are nice, but they aren't the be-all-end-all. Proper saddle fit is most important. If your sit bones don't fit your saddle no amount of padding is going to help much at all short of sitting on a pillow. If you saddle is close to proper fit they'll help. If you just aren't used to longer rides yet and your butt hurts after your normal distance but not before then the shorts will help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,021 Posts
Do they really make a bike seat that doesn't kill your butt or make you feel like you just took a line drive to the boys?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,314 Posts
Sure, but the one for me might not work for you. Saddle position relative to the pedal axle, handlebars, seat height, saddle nose position, saddle fore/aft position...it all comes into play. Add bike suspension front or full and you add in another set of variables....and they all affect each other in some way. Sometimes getting the seat postion right is a never ending battle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,211 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I rode yesterday and after 20 miles (10 each way) I had enough. I know there are days when the energy just is not there but yesterday the soul was willing but the butt was in danger of being rejected by my brain. Maybe a gel seat or cover will help. On the bright side my back side does not hurt as much the day after a ride as it has in the past. Building callouses or killing nerve endings; whatever it takes.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,313 Posts
They do make seat stems with built in shock absorbers nowdays. Also a wider seat is not always better on your buns.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
28,119 Posts
Just came here to start a new bike thread, but figure mine will fit into this one w/out hijacking it....too much


I've been biking for many years. Used to do a lot of trail riding, and the bike I ride now is still the same one I rode trails with 20 years ago. As far as fit, it's fine. It's older and has no shocks, but I've kept it well maintained. I haven't ridden near as much as I used to since we've been spitting out kids over the past 12 years, but do so when I can.

I usually go to the gym during lunch and mostly do cardio, but I hate being in the gym when the weather is nice. I had been throwing the bike in the truck and riding at lunchtime, but recently I've started riding to work. The route I take is 14.9 miles each way with 3 hills involved, 2 of which are killers! It's tough on the way there, but fun on the way home
Just one hard hill on the way home.
Except for the big hills, most of the ride is relatively level, some up and down grading but at most only have to drop a gear or sometimes two. Those long level stretches are where the seat fit really comes into play. That's where one tends to use the seat the most. Also where numbing sometimes occurs on certain body parts.

Which is why I just ordered the padded drawers. I used to have a gel cover on the seat which prevented that numbing.

I may take the plunge and buy a new bike this Winter, but for now the ol' Raleigh is fulfilling the need. Kinda proud of the condition it's still in (as well as this 50 year old body)! And that I can ride along with the others on the trails that are riding on newer bikes with all the bells and whistles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,211 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I rode yesterday for the first time in a week. Had to let it go for a while because it was so flaming hot. Anyhow, I too have now gone to the padded pants and I have noticed that the sore rear is not a bad as before. But, I have a really tough time on hills and although I am getting better I have never been good on hills either running (which I used to do a lot before the Neuropathay happened) or even just hiking. I considered blaming the gears on the bike as the issue with hills, but I must just accept the fact that that it's me and my body not being good on hills. Yesterday I encountered a young woman, probably in her late 20's or early 30's, going up a steep hill that I had just walked my bike up. She managed to crank her bike up that thing and although she was wined and clearly working very hard made it. Now, I am 66 and still 50 pounds more than what I should weigh but in my mind I still think that someday I am going to get to a point on this bike that I do not need to walk them hill but will pedal up them like other people do. Well, that's my brain says anyhow, and this is part of the fun and I suppose why I keep after this stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,314 Posts
jimsdad said:
I rode yesterday for the first time in a week. Had to let it go for a while because it was so flaming hot. Anyhow, I too have now gone to the padded pants and I have noticed that the sore rear is not a bad as before. But, I have a really tough time on hills and although I am getting better I have never been good on hills either running (which I used to do a lot before the Neuropathay happened) or even just hiking. I considered blaming the gears on the bike as the issue with hills, but I must just accept the fact that that it's me and my body not being good on hills. Yesterday I encountered a young woman, probably in her late 20's or early 30's, going up a steep hill that I had just walked my bike up. She managed to crank her bike up that thing and although she was wined and clearly working very hard made it. Now, I am 66 and still 50 pounds more than what I should weigh but in my mind I still think that someday I am going to get to a point on this bike that I do not need to walk them hill but will pedal up them like other people do. Well, that's my brain says anyhow, and this is part of the fun and I suppose why I keep after this stuff.
Do you use clipless pedals and shoes? It's not a must, but if you learn to 'spin' you'll conquer the hills. Basically, you pull back/up with the weak leg while applying force with the strong leg on the pedal stroke. Amplifies your power and will let you maintain momentum longer and keep you winded, but moving.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,211 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
JasonN said:
jimsdad said:
I rode yesterday for the first time in a week. Had to let it go for a while because it was so flaming hot. Anyhow, I too have now gone to the padded pants and I have noticed that the sore rear is not a bad as before. But, I have a really tough time on hills and although I am getting better I have never been good on hills either running (which I used to do a lot before the Neuropathay happened) or even just hiking. I considered blaming the gears on the bike as the issue with hills, but I must just accept the fact that that it's me and my body not being good on hills. Yesterday I encountered a young woman, probably in her late 20's or early 30's, going up a steep hill that I had just walked my bike up. She managed to crank her bike up that thing and although she was wined and clearly working very hard made it. Now, I am 66 and still 50 pounds more than what I should weigh but in my mind I still think that someday I am going to get to a point on this bike that I do not need to walk them hill but will pedal up them like other people do. Well, that's my brain says anyhow, and this is part of the fun and I suppose why I keep after this stuff.
Do you use clipless pedals and shoes? It's not a must, but if you learn to 'spin' you'll conquer the hills. Basically, you pull back/up with the weak leg while applying force with the strong leg on the pedal stroke. Amplifies your power and will let you maintain momentum longer and keep you winded, but moving.
JasonN - I use toeclips; but only on the drive pedal because I just can not get used to the process of inserting my feet into toeclips on both sides. Almost killed myself trying both sides a number of times. I try to get some upward force from the right pedal but it sure would help if I was coordinated enough to get the benefit of both feet on the upstroke. One thing for sure - using the toeclip (just on one side) has helped and I no longer have the problem of my feet slipping off the pedals; at least on the right side. Maybe I should try clipless as they appear (could be my wishful tinkling) to be more user friendly than toeclips.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,211 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
RobOz said:
Laugh all you want, but this is the seat I use.

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Honeycomb-AirGel-Tech-Seat/4645496

Yes, it's an old man seat, but it do save the butt.
RobOz - I will definitely look into this. I long ago gave up on the trapping of "youth" and if another rider looks down their nose at my saddle as an old-man's seat, well so be it. And, what the heck are they looking at my seat for anyhow!?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,144 Posts
I ride road and mountain bike but I am not one of these hard core riders. I get out maybe twice a week. Mountain biking for me now is riding the dirt state forest roads. I remember switching to clipless pedals. It does not take much to get used to and I would not have it any other way. Your foot is secure while tension is set that you can get out easily. It's a world of difference once you get used to it.

Riding is great, low impact exercise. I just need to do more of it. Gained some weight over the past couple years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,314 Posts
I loathe toe clips! They're just dangerous since you can't get out of them....as you know...in a hurry.

Clipless are as easy as flicking your heel a few degrees and you're out. Shoes can be had online cheap, but make sure where you get them from has a good return policy if you go that route....bike shoes are all over the map on fitment. One brand is right on mark, the next is 3 sizes too small....I've never found them to be too big. I have a spare set of Shimano pedals I'll ship to you if you want. They can be found cheap online too. Also, check out Nashbar.com for low prices.

I can say that I've been running clipless shoes/pedals for over 5 years and I can't stand flats now. Toe clips of years past aren't even something I'd consider. After countless wrecks in less than forgiving environments I've never had any issues coming out of the pedals....it just magically happens without thought on your part. They make spinning, bunny hops, jumping, manualing and general trail riding better. I realize you probably aren't doing most of that, but it makes a difference all around either way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,211 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
JasonN - thanks for all of the help and vector to that site. I called a local bike shop and they are going to set me up with what I need to get started re the Shimano SPD set-up pedals, shoes and whatever adjustments are needed. As for the spinning, bunny hops and manualing --shoot, I don't even know what this stuff is and except for the bunny hop sounds pretty intimidating!!

Thank again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,314 Posts


I highly doubt you'll ever have to manual unless you take up mountain biking....and I mean seriously get into it. Basically, it's riding a wheelie without pedaling....using your balance to lift the front wheel and ride on the back wheel alone. It's used often for clearing obstacles like logs and rocks on the trail or dropping off a ledge so you don't endo.

Spinning though, you want to learn and use. it's simply using the down AND back/up stroke of the pedaling/cranking cycle to increase and/or maintain a constant force and speed. Road bikers do this virtually at all times. they change gears as conditions dictate (hills), but keep the cranks turning at the same RPM's all the time. It allows them to maintain a steady heart rate and power output regardless of conditions. Mt. biking is more like HIIT training. Coasting down, hammering up...it's hard to 'spin' on the trail due to constantly changing tread....rocks, roots, rough ground, etc. Spinning will increase your fitness if the type of riding you're doing permits it....like road or bike path riding. I'm sure it's not surprising, but they make very expensive cranks with sensors in them will measure and record and output the data of your spinning like RPM's, variance, watts produced, heart rate, etc. all tied into your smart phone or bike computer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,314 Posts
Oh, I almost always recommend going to your local bike shop first. In this case though, I wouldn't plop down the $$$ for something you aren't sure of. My first clipless pedals were Shimano's cheapest offering on clearance from some online retailer and a pair of $10 shoes on clearance as well. I liked them....now I'm embarrassed to say to what my pedals and shoes cost!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,211 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Great info, as always! Right now I am laying off the bike but I have made plans to take the next step and get the Shimano clipless pedals from the local bike shop. Kind of hitting the heavy weights hard right now - just to break things up a bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
jimsdad said:
JasonN said:
jimsdad said:
I rode yesterday for the first time in a week. Had to let it go for a while because it was so flaming hot. Anyhow, I too have now gone to the padded pants and I have noticed that the sore rear is not a bad as before. But, I have a really tough time on hills and although I am getting better I have never been good on hills either running (which I used to do a lot before the Neuropathay happened) or even just hiking. I considered blaming the gears on the bike as the issue with hills, but I must just accept the fact that that it's me and my body not being good on hills. Yesterday I encountered a young woman, probably in her late 20's or early 30's, going up a steep hill that I had just walked my bike up. She managed to crank her bike up that thing and although she was wined and clearly working very hard made it. Now, I am 66 and still 50 pounds more than what I should weigh but in my mind I still think that someday I am going to get to a point on this bike that I do not need to walk them hill but will pedal up them like other people do. Well, that's my brain says anyhow, and this is part of the fun and I suppose why I keep after this stuff.
Do you use clipless pedals and shoes? It's not a must, but if you learn to 'spin' you'll conquer the hills. Basically, you pull back/up with the weak leg while applying force with the strong leg on the pedal stroke. Amplifies your power and will let you maintain momentum longer and keep you winded, but moving.
JasonN - I use toeclips; but only on the drive pedal because I just can not get used to the process of inserting my feet into toeclips on both sides. Almost killed myself trying both sides a number of times. I try to get some upward force from the right pedal but it sure would help if I was coordinated enough to get the benefit of both feet on the upstroke. One thing for sure - using the toeclip (just on one side) has helped and I no longer have the problem of my feet slipping off the pedals; at least on the right side. Maybe I should try clipless as they appear (could be my wishful tinkling) to be more user friendly than toeclips.
I use these...
SHIMANO M324 SPD Pedal
Kind of the best of both worlds. I can clip in (95% of the time) or just hop on with regular shoes for a short spin someplace.
I have these on my "Cannondale Road Warrior" hybrid road bike... I've ridden 50 miles (clipped in) and they've worked great for me.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top