The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

1 - 20 of 62 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,349 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
HARRISBURG — It's the logical question.
The Pennsylvania Game Commission offers a mentored youth hunting program, which lets kids younger than 12 try hunting without first having to get a license. Created in 2005, it's intended to get kids interested in the outdoors before the demands of youth sports and other activities take them away.
Is it working to create hunters?
The answer is: perhaps. Coren Jagnow, of the commission's research and education division, looked at the buying histories of the nearly 99,000 junior hunters — kids ages 12-16 — who had a junior license or junior combo license going into deer season last fall.
One of the things she looked at was whether children who had a mentored permit at least once bought more licenses between the ages of 12 and 16 than those who didn't.
“The answer is absolutely yes, they do,” Jagnow told commissioners at their Monday work group meeting.
The older a junior hunter was, and the more consistent he or she was in buying a license each year, the more likely they were to have come from a mentored background, she added.
She offered one caution with that, though. That results suggest “correlation, but not necessarily causation,” she said.
In other words, it's unclear whether mentored youth hunting alone turned young hunters into sportsmen or if they more likely joined the ranks because they came from a background where their adult mentors made a point of introducing them to hunting, she said.
Commissioner Tim Layton of Windber said the result is the same.
“We're developing hunters to the long-term,” he said.
They are more avid than the average youngster, at least.
Jagnow looked at what kind of licenses the 99,000 junior hunters bought: regular junior licenses, which gave them the right to hunt, or junior combo licenses, which carried extra privileges, allowing to take part in archery, muzzleloader and furtaking seasons.
She discovered that while youngsters with a mentored background accounted for only 45 percent of the overall junior hunter pool, they represented more than half of combo licenses sales.
That benefits juniors by providing extra opportunities, and the commission financially, she said. A regular junior hunting license sells for $6.70, a combo license for $9.70.
Bob Frye is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at [email protected] or via Twitter @bobfryeoutdoors.


Read more: http://triblive.com/sports/outdoors/8348989-74/mentored-hunting-junior#ixzz3adQRVYQW
Follow us: @triblive on Twitter | triblive on Facebook
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,605 Posts
<span style="font-style: italic">In other words, it's unclear whether mentored youth hunting alone turned young hunters into sportsmen or if they more likely joined the ranks because they came from a background where their adult mentors made a point of introducing them to hunting, she said.</span>

I don't think it is unclear at all.

Would be interesting to poll the mentors to determine what % of them are parents of the child, kind of environment the child was growing up in, (guns in the house, siblings that hunt, etc). Without any data to go by, my gut tells me that most of the kids in the MY program would end up with a license at some point anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,376 Posts
Quick case. A guy I work with has never hunted, but his 10yr old asked him about it. He said something to us at work about it, so we took him turkey hunting. He is now 14 and has hunted every year since then. He may have found someone after he turned 12, but with the program we were able to get him started from a nonhunting household. His dad now hunts too, so the program also got an adult hunting for the first time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,112 Posts
Hunterknapp16 said:
Only common sense tells someone that introducing early will help.
Very true, I introduced my son in to hunting when he was around 5. He is 26 and pretty much obsessed. then again I wasn't introduced until my early 20's and I am the same way. So who knows.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,560 Posts
Not trying to be a killjoy but I just don't see how it matters. At some point in life the person is going to decide if they really enjoy hunting or if they were only doing it because it made Mom,Dad or someone else happy. Peer pressure can sometimes be overcome but not often without isolation or inclusion. At some point the special privileges like riding the ATV, driving the truck, skipping school, things done at camp that "stay" at camp, ect all just fade into life. When that happens the person must decide if they are there for the hunting or just the other aspects.

My parents did not hunt, my uncles and brothers did. Long before mentored youth program started I was introduced at an early age via hanging and wanting to hang and do what my brothers were doing.
First time I hunted was when I was 12 but did a lot of scouting trips and walking trap lines well before that age.
My son started hunting at age 13 due to birth date and illness the first day of Doe when he turned 12. He is in his 30's now and still hunts but in my opinion does not hunt enough with me.
. I could not see how introducing him sooner would have changed the outcome.
My grandson is pushing 5 and we may go hunting this year. Maybe start with crickets and grasshoppers and move on to night crawlers and fire flies. Be a while before any real hunting with me. Waugh!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,132 Posts
Jim,It's a different world today.Just ride around some residential areas during the summer and take note of how many kids you see out playing.It's not as many as you'd see 30 years ago.Computers,video games and smart phones have taken over the lives of young people.You need to brain wash them at an early age so they develop an appreciation for the outdoors.That begins long before you put a weapon in their hands.However,when they become an active participant and the focus of the hunt is on them,it drives the desire to hunt much deeper.Starting them out the right way at an earlier age makes a huge difference and my 10 year old is testiment to that.

My son loves to be in the woods and we're out there almost every chance we get,12 months of the year.I can tell you for a fact that although he just needs to be out there,he's more enthusiastic when he's in pursuit of something.He hunted as a 9 year old this past year which was his third year hunting.He killed a pile of squirrels,+/- 15 woodchucks,a buck+2 doe and he just killed a big gobbler last week.At this point he's not much different than taking an adult with me.I didn't have to coach him through one shot this past year and he never asked to leave early one time.Young kids,given the chance are way more capable than most adults realize.The MY program rules.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
941 Posts
jimbridger said:
Not trying to be a killjoy but I just don't see how it matters. At some point in life the person is going to decide if they really enjoy hunting or if they were only doing it because it made Mom,Dad or someone else happy.
Couldn't agree more. If a child is born amongst a hunting family they really have no choice in the matter, they're going hunting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,132 Posts
Not true.Hunting is a major part of my life and I included my daughter at a very early age,before the MY program existed.I thought for sure she'd hunt but by the time she turned 12 she had no interest because she got involved with other things.When she turned 16,she wanted to start hunting because she saw the enthusiasm her little brother had.I bought her guns,cloths,lisence and had her shooting all of last year as well as scouting with us.She never went one time.Why?Well,in my opinion it may seem like fun but she doesn't have any real desire to go through all the preperation because she's never got to experience that adrenaline.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,376 Posts
BassBlaster said:
jimbridger said:
Not trying to be a killjoy but I just don't see how it matters. At some point in life the person is going to decide if they really enjoy hunting or if they were only doing it because it made Mom,Dad or someone else happy.
Couldn't agree more. If a child is born amongst a hunting family they really have no choice in the matter, they're going hunting.
And what about kids not born into a hunting family, like the one I mentioned. Sure, he may have been introduced two years later, but maybe not too. Bottom line is that it isn't hurting to start them early.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,310 Posts
Couldn't agree more. If a child is born amongst a hunting family they really have no choice in the matter, they're going hunting.
A ton of jock dads are disappointed that their kids have no interest in sports.

It's all about what is available today vs yesteryear. 30 years ago, all kids wanted to be outside. Playing sports, swimming, sledding, playing fort in the woods, playing capture the flag, etc.....of course they wanted to hunt and would wait until they were 12.

Now, iPod, smartphone, computer, video games. Kids are not outside anymore. By 12 years old, they don't care what they're missing.

I can only tell you what I saw with my son and friends' sons. MY got them into hunting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,132 Posts
+100

Technology has destroyed the motivation,creativity and productivity of kids today.You need to get them hooked on other things before they fall into that trap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,652 Posts
Or, just take them to camp for example and turn 'em loose in the woods. If they have no access to TV, computer games and the like, most will adapt.

We took her two grandsons to camp when they were still pretty young, maybe 7 and 9? All they did was fuss on the three hour drive up, about "nothing to do all weekend". Even grandma was starting to get on my nerves, worrying about how bored they'd be.

The oldest one was off in the woods shortly after we got there. Pretty soon his bro got tired of his gameboy and joined him. Hardly saw 'em after that, had to screech repeatedly to fetch 'em in to eat.

Next time we took along a grand daughter, same thing.

Up until the boys told her they were gonna tie her to a tree and let the bears eat her. Grandma showed her a pic of a bear up behind camp that my mom had taken some years before and that was that.

Kid stuck to us like glue the entire time.


But the boys stayed out the entir weekend. Give them a chance to ditch the doodads, turn 'em loose in the woods and see what happens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,072 Posts
dce said:
Jim,It's a different world today.Just ride around some residential areas during the summer and take note of how many kids you see out playing.It's not as many as you'd see 30 years ago.Computers,video games and smart phones have taken over the lives of young people.You need to brain wash them at an early age so they develop an appreciation for the outdoors.That begins long before you put a weapon in their hands.However,when they become an active participant and the focus of the hunt is on them,it drives the desire to hunt much deeper.Starting them out the right way at an earlier age makes a huge difference and my 10 year old is testiment to that.

My son loves to be in the woods and we're out there almost every chance we get,12 months of the year.I can tell you for a fact that although he just needs to be out there,he's more enthusiastic when he's in pursuit of something.He hunted as a 9 year old this past year which was his third year hunting.He killed a pile of squirrels,+/- 15 woodchucks,a buck+2 doe and he just killed a big gobbler last week.At this point he's not much different than taking an adult with me.I didn't have to coach him through one shot this past year and he never asked to leave early one time.Young kids,given the chance are way more capable than most adults realize.The MY program rules.
SPOT ON!! I am following this lead. I am just hoping that many of the mentors are doing more than just focusing on the kill. DCE seems to be doing it right, and is what I am doing with my son. Be it catching salamanders, fishing, roosting gobblers, scouting for deer he is out there learning. He can tell you deer poop, and what coyote poop is. I know he is retaining because on our first roosting trip he gets out of the escape and joins me down the gamelands road. About 100 yards down he picks up and acorn and say "Daddy, a Acorn, Its what deer eats" Very proud of that and that I am teaching him more about the outdoors than just pulling the trigger at an animal. Not many 2.5 year olds can ID deer tracks, turkey tracks, handle trout on a fly rod, or id an acorn and what animals eat it. I am proud of that and am fine with gloating about it. LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,529 Posts
As much as we think we know why a child does or doesn't hunt, and subsequently quote examples to support our believes, we don't have a clue.
I have two sons. We live in the woods. I had my children fishing, going for walks, observing wildlife, etc. They both hunted at 12 taking advantage of youth days and before then mentor activities when they became available.
They both experienced success early in their hunting careers shooting a buck and a doe in their first year. We also hunted turkeys and small game. I didn't make it an endurance test, made sure they had all the right equipment and clothing. I really wanted lifetime hunting partners and took all activities in mind to increase the probability that would be the outcome.
My older son hunted two years, then stopped.
My younger son hunted passionately until he passed away at the age of 14.
Environmentally, they were raised in the same setting. Being exposed to hunting by parents who have a goal to develop hunters, and live in a house with hunting readily in the backyard, had a very different level of interest.
So, for everyone who has the straightforward view of what makes a child hunt, please explain my situation. I would truly appreciate understanding the difference in my sons.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,132 Posts
TurkeyMike said:
dce said:
Jim,It's a different world today.Just ride around some residential areas during the summer and take note of how many kids you see out playing.It's not as many as you'd see 30 years ago.Computers,video games and smart phones have taken over the lives of young people.You need to brain wash them at an early age so they develop an appreciation for the outdoors.That begins long before you put a weapon in their hands.However,when they become an active participant and the focus of the hunt is on them,it drives the desire to hunt much deeper.Starting them out the right way at an earlier age makes a huge difference and my 10 year old is testiment to that.

My son loves to be in the woods and we're out there almost every chance we get,12 months of the year.I can tell you for a fact that although he just needs to be out there,he's more enthusiastic when he's in pursuit of something.He hunted as a 9 year old this past year which was his third year hunting.He killed a pile of squirrels,+/- 15 woodchucks,a buck+2 doe and he just killed a big gobbler last week.At this point he's not much different than taking an adult with me.I didn't have to coach him through one shot this past year and he never asked to leave early one time.Young kids,given the chance are way more capable than most adults realize.The MY program rules.
SPOT ON!! I am following this lead. I am just hoping that many of the mentors are doing more than just focusing on the kill. DCE seems to be doing it right, and is what I am doing with my son. Be it catching salamanders, fishing, roosting gobblers, scouting for deer he is out there learning. He can tell you deer poop, and what coyote poop is. I know he is retaining because on our first roosting trip he gets out of the escape and joins me down the gamelands road. About 100 yards down he picks up and acorn and say "Daddy, a Acorn, Its what deer eats" Very proud of that and that I am teaching him more about the outdoors than just pulling the trigger at an animal. Not many 2.5 year olds can ID deer tracks, turkey tracks, handle trout on a fly rod, or id an acorn and what animals eat it. I am proud of that and am fine with gloating about it. LOL
They do retain what you say and they're way more capable than what many people think,especially if you work at it.It's amazing how much they change from year to year.The MY program has changed my life.I don't give a frog's fat bagonia about killing anything any more.Watching it all unfold in front of my son is way better.There's nothin like it.My kid dusted a woodchuck this past weekend at a lazered 218 yards.After he shot,he looked at me and said,right in the head.When we went down there,that's right where he hit it.Watching them go from the lowest of lows with a missed opportunity to the highest of highs when it all comes together is something every father needs to experience.

Mike,it's not just about the success.It's about the journey getting there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,132 Posts
HomeintheWoods said:
As much as we think we know why a child does or doesn't hunt, and subsequently quote examples to support our believes, we don't have a clue.
I have two sons. We live in the woods. I had my children fishing, going for walks, observing wildlife, etc. They both hunted at 12 taking advantage of youth days and before then mentor activities when they became available.
They both experienced success early in their hunting careers shooting a buck and a doe in their first year. We also hunted turkeys and small game. I didn't make it an endurance test, made sure they had all the right equipment and clothing. I really wanted lifetime hunting partners and took all activities in mind to increase the probability that would be the outcome.
My older son hunted two years, then stopped.
My younger son hunted passionately until he passed away at the age of 14.
Environmentally, they were raised in the same setting. Being exposed to hunting by parents who have a goal to develop hunters, and live in a house with hunting readily in the backyard, had a very different level of interest.
So, for everyone who has the straightforward view of what makes a child hunt, please explain my situation. I would truly appreciate understanding the difference in my sons.
Any two kids raised exactly the same way can turn out to be polar opposites.No one is guaranteeing that every MY will become a lifelong hunter but the sooner they get it,the better chance of them retaining the interest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,132 Posts
DennyF said:
Or, just take them to camp for example and turn 'em loose in the woods. If they have no access to TV, computer games and the like, most will adapt.

We took her two grandsons to camp when they were still pretty young, maybe 7 and 9? All they did was fuss on the three hour drive up, about "nothing to do all weekend". Even grandma was starting to get on my nerves, worrying about how bored they'd be.

The oldest one was off in the woods shortly after we got there. Pretty soon his bro got tired of his gameboy and joined him. Hardly saw 'em after that, had to screech repeatedly to fetch 'em in to eat.

Next time we took along a grand daughter, same thing.

Up until the boys told her they were gonna tie her to a tree and let the bears eat her. Grandma showed her a pic of a bear up behind camp that my mom had taken some years before and that was that.

Kid stuck to us like glue the entire time.


But the boys stayed out the entir weekend. Give them a chance to ditch the doodads, turn 'em loose in the woods and see what happens.
We live in the middle of no where Denny.My kids can ride horses,4 wheelers,dirtbikes,walk in the woods and shoot any time they want.It's a big beautiful world out there and I won't let them have video games.My daughter had a boyfriend that used to bring his x-box over because my kids didn't have one.It's pretty bad when you can't leave home without your video game.It's so bad that they don't even have to go over to their buddy's to play.They can strap a head set on and play these warped games against their friends without leaving their flippin rooms.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,652 Posts
No worse than a house full of people after a family dinner (Easter being the most recent example) - all sitting around texting on their phones.

Guess who makes a point to heckle them: Put the phones down and try speaking directly to each other, dangit!

When the grandkids were younger, I used to make 'em put their phones in a wicker basket before we ate meals for family gatherings, when at our house.



Kinda like on Gunsmoke, when Matt Dillon was the marshall and allowed no firearms in town: No cussed phones at the table.

 
1 - 20 of 62 Posts
Top