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Discussion Starter #1
Guess I have to change my name...I jumped ship and switched to a mathews last year. I'm now shooting a halon. I switched over my sight from the hoyt(copper john) and was a little concerned that I had to lower the housing real far down and my 20 yard pin had to be set in the middle. This year I decided to switch to a single pin sight. I just mounted a truglo range rover pro. I have that thing maxed out to the lowest possible setting and still cant get it low enough for my 20 yard setting. At its lowest position, for 20yds I have to use the 25yd mark that was installed on the sight. Now with the housing sitting so low, I cant adjust but half way to give enough clearance above the arrow. In order to do that I had to adjust my rest and the loop, and am now shooting a little nock low....I'm really confused. The bow is set up properly, but why is there so little room for the sight? Am I missing something simple here?
 

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I'm confused? If nock low you are raising the front of the arrow closer to the sight? I worked in a Mathews shop for years and never had this happen with any sight? Arrow across the berger hole and nock @ 1/8" high usually works?
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Yes nock low did raise the front of the arrow, but it was the only way to give me more adjustability with the sight. It wasn't setup even with hole. It was about half and slight nock high(back of bubble touching back line). But the overall distance between sight and arrow didn't change. I did shoot out to 50 with no contact with the sight, but I would be afraid to shoot 60.
Any input is welcomed, I have basic knowledge and abilities to setup a bow and I'm really confused and don't know what to do to correct this.
 

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One thing to look at is your peep sight, and your anchor. The sight looks right to me. I used to mess with Mathews bows, and nver had this issue. They usually tuned closer to the riser than other bows, but with sights I never had this issue. I have encountered this with some folks, and the issue was the peep, and "D" loop, or nock point. Your regular form you are used to may not go well with this bow--I've seen this before too.
I agree though that you should not have your sight all the way down like that. I always tell folks when sighting in--chase the arrow when moving the sight.
 

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Lowering your anchor point and raising your peep sight will cause you to raise your sight housing and will solve the problem. I would start by lowering your arrow rest to center arrow with berger button hole, with your rest in the down position you only need a credit card gap or so from hitting riser. Next I would get rid of the nock sets above the arrow and just nock the arrow inside the D-loop.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
One thing to look at is your peep sight, and your anchor. The sight looks right to me. I used to mess with Mathews bows, and nver had this issue. They usually tuned closer to the riser than other bows, but with sights I never had this issue. I have encountered this with some folks, and the issue was the peep, and "D" loop, or nock point. Your regular form you are used to may not go well with this bow--I've seen this before too.
I agree though that you should not have your sight all the way down like that. I always tell folks when sighting in--chase the arrow when moving the sight.
Thanks I was wondering about my anchor. I've always anchored high, I guess it's from shooting with fingers back in the day.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Lowering your anchor point and raising your peep sight will cause you to raise your sight housing and will solve the problem. I would start by lowering your arrow rest to center arrow with berger button hole, with your rest in the down position you only need a credit card gap or so from hitting riser. Next I would get rid of the nock sets above the arrow and just nock the arrow inside the D-loop.
Thank you. I think I agree with all you said, especially the way they have the loop. I never did like it, but this bow shoots so good, I didn't argue it.
 

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Lowering your anchor point and raising your peep sight will cause you to raise your sight housing and will solve the problem. I would start by lowering your arrow rest to center arrow with berger button hole, with your rest in the down position you only need a credit card gap or so from hitting riser. Next I would get rid of the nock sets above the arrow and just nock the arrow inside the D-loop.
I know in the past when switching to a new bow that form that we are used to can be difficult on the new bow.
I know its tough to change things in that aspect, but if the bow itself--sight, rest, and simple tuning seem spot on then we know something else is going on. It gets hard when we have to begin a process of making a bow fit us.
Changing your anchor, peep sight, and such can quickly lead you to issues where you have to teach yourself new technique/form. I hate to say this, but some folks even get frustrated enough they get rid of the bow. For most folks like myself finances do not allow for such a major change like that. So--what to do?
I honestly believe by looking at things like Pa. Bone suggested will help you.
I truly hope you get this worked out.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for all of the suggestions and yes it is frustrating. I'm going to redo the loop like normal. That alone should raise my peep up 1/2" or so. I didn't want to change anything now in case it would throw my form way off. But I was able to tag out today thanks to this sight. I gotta admit, i was hesitant on a single pin sight at first, but I'm glad i got one now. I had a small hole to shoot thru at an in between range of 26yds. There was no guessing with where to hold. I'll keep everyone posted on how I make out with this.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Just to update, I redid the loop, which did raise the peep up. I havent retuned it yet, but I am hitting 6 inches high at 20 now. Once I check the tune that should raise the sight up a lot. Things are at least heading in the right direction. Thank you all that has helped, I hope this will help others that may run into this in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Here's the final outcome. I spent the last week adjusting to a lower anchor and set the peep for that. I gained another half of an inch on peep height. Here's pics of where the sight adjusts to now at 20, and the clearance at 60. Looks a lot better. I think I need a longer draw module if I want to gain any more as anchoring lower is pushing the limits on this draw length. All I need to do now is get rid of the nock pinch and I'm good to go.
 

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I've never had to change my anchor ever when going from one bow to another.
When setting up a new bow, first thing you do is set the rest so your arrow passes thru the CENTER of the rest mounting hole. Adjust your "centershot" by eyeballing or with a gauge.
Next, tie in your loop so arrow is approx. 1/8" nock high. Your nock goes between the two knots of your loop (no pinching).
Put your sight on and set a 20 yard pin.
Shoot 50-100 arrows to break in string.
Put on peep.
Start tuning process. Paper and/or walk back. I like both.
Adjust your right and left with slight rest adjustments.
Adjust your up and down by twisting your D-loop up or down your string as needed to get perfect arrow flight.
 

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In the hunting industry there are things that have moved us forward when it comes to technology, and then there will always be those items that promise a shorter, better, and easier way to get to the end result.
I am reminded of the famed Aldo Leopold. In a 1943 essay "Wildlife in American Culture" he wrote:
"Then came the gadgeteer, otherwise known as the sporting-goods dealer. He has draped the American outdoors man with an infinity of contraptions, all offered as aids to self-reliance, hardihood, woodcraft, or marksmanship, but too often functioning as substitutes for them."
It's human nature to want an easier path, and not just in the hunting world, but in many aspects of our lives. When it comes to hunting however many opt to fore-go the journey that was once hunting all for a promise of the end result.
The amount of items-'gadgets" out there in today's hunting world is amazing. When I see, or look at much of this stuff I tell myself--I'm in the wrong line of business.
There is in fact an easier way to success--at least when it comes to making money--make, and market a product--all in the name of easier, better, faster, and convince the public it's a must have, and watch the money roll in.
 
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