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On July 20, dozens of businesses, including global vehicle manufacturing leaders, urged Pennsylvania decision makers to accelerate the electrification of trucks and buses throughout the Commonwealth.

The Electrification Coalition delivered a letter July 20 signed by 31 businesses, asking Pennsylvania legislators and Gov. Tom Wolf’s administration to advance additional policies and programs to meet the goals of the Multi-State Medium- and Heavy-Duty Zero Emission Vehicle Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), pledging that at least 30 percent of all new trucks and buses sold in Pennsylvania will be zero-emission vehicles by 2030, and 100 percent by 2050.
Fifteen states, including Pennsylvania, have already signed the agreement. To meet its targets, Pennsylvania must continue to move forward with policy actions, such as purchase incentives, electrification of transit and school buses and investment in electric vehicle charging infrastructure.
“We applaud the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for taking important first steps, including the formation of the Drive Electric Pennsylvania Coalition (DEPA) and the commitment to the multi-state agreement to electrify trucks and buses,” said Electrification Coalition Executive Director Ben Prochazka. “It is now vital to build upon that work by taking the necessary actions to meet the objectives outlined in the MOU. Doing so will yield important benefits for the future of Pennsylvania and the American transportation industry.”
Electric vehicle technology has improved rapidly over the last decade, paving the way for new models of every vehicle class. Mack Trucks, a part of Volvo Group North America, began taking orders in 2020 for its Mack LR Electric refuse truck, manufactured at its Lehigh Valley Operations plant in Macungie, Penn.
The LR Electric is helping to build widespread acceptance of zero-emissions solutions in the very demanding refuse segment.
“Mack Trucks is committed to advancing electromobility solutions, both globally and right here in Pennsylvania,” said Jonathan Miller, Senior Vice President of Public Affairs, Volvo Group North America. “Pennsylvania’s participation in the Multi-State Medium- and Heavy-Duty Zero Emission Vehicle MOU should be the impetus behind additional Pennsylvania policies to facilitate the deployment of zero-emission trucks here. These investments are supporting good jobs, clean air, energy security and climate protection.”
Signatories on the letter to state leaders include Amply, EVgo, Mack Trucks, Proterra, Rivian, Siemens, Volvo Group North America, Nestlé USA and other large and small businesses throughout the Commonwealth.
“The pace of electrification of all types of transportation and growing demand for infrastructure for electric vehicle charging will have a dramatic impact on energy infrastructure in Pennsylvania and beyond,” said John Vernacchia, energy transition segment director for Eaton. “We encourage our elected leaders to support a new power paradigm that advances the energy transition broadly, and vehicle electrification specifically.”
In the letter to state leaders, businesses called for the following policy actions to maintain Pennsylvania’s momentum for medium- and heavy-duty electrification:
-- Support for electrification of public transit and school buses to provide clean, healthy ways for Pennsylvania residents to travel to and from school, work and home
-- Support for incentives, utility investments and state targets that will accelerate the electrification of trucks that travel along highways and through neighborhoods
-- Investment in the development of medium- and heavy-duty electric vehicle charging infrastructure to ensure that Pennsylvania does not miss out on the economic opportunities afforded by the electrification of transportation.
The United States is the world’s largest consumer of petroleum, accounting for one-fifth of global daily supply, with oil accounting for more than 90 percent of energy use in the U.S. transportation sector.
The country’s dependence on oil has broad implications for public health, national security, the climate and the future of American manufacturing jobs.
“It’s difficult to overstate the influence that global oil markets have over our national security, foreign policy and economy,” said Adm. Dennis Blair, who served as Commander in Chief of the U.S. Pacific Command and as Director of National Intelligence. “The United States spends tens of billions of defense dollars every year to protect U.S. oil supplies around the world. If we were to electrify our transportation system and end this overwhelming dependence on oil, we would be able to spend precious national security resources on priorities like dealing with China, Russia, Iran and North Korea."
Robust public investment and regulatory reform along the EV supply chain has the potential to create more than 500,000 jobs across the United States over a five-year period, according to a report by the Electrification Coalition and Securing America’s Future Energy.
Nearly 154,000 of those jobs would stem from incentives that make it less expensive to purchase medium- and heavy-duty EVs like trucks and buses.
Conventional vehicles are a leading source of air pollutants that affect human health.
Emissions from internal combustion engines contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone and are a major source of particulate matter, which can trigger health problems such as aggravated asthma, reduced lung capacity, lung cancer, heart attacks, increased susceptibility to pneumonia and bronchitis and other health issues.
Low-income and minority communities are more likely to be located near highways and other transportation facilities that lead to negative health effects resulting from vehicle emissions.
Transportation is also the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States.
According to the American Lung Association, widespread adoption of electric vehicles by 2050 would result in an estimated savings of $72 billion per year in health costs nationally.
In Pennsylvania alone, the annual benefits would include $2.4 billion in avoided health-impact costs, 206 premature deaths avoided, 2,399 asthma attacks avoided and 10,814 lost work days avoided.
Click Here for a copy of the letter.
 

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Pretty much checks all the PC boxes don't it? I was nauseated after the second paragraph but managed to get to the end.
Well, I reckon these folks have figured out how to solve 2.4 billion bucks worth of health problems.:rolleyes: Like all political BS, sounds great don't it?
No mention of the future costs of toxic waste, how we're going to charge all those trucks, the infrastructure problems or the costs of implementation.

You don't think these " dozens" of businesses are posturing for any subsidies do you?

And we certainly need to protect all the low income and minority communities living near the highways.

GO ELECTRIC OR DIE! ITS A PETRO PANDEMIC! WE NEED TO DEFUND BIG OIL!
 

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Yeah, what about the jobs lost? Maybe we'll wind up like West Virginia. Instead of coal, it'll be meth.
What job loss's? The one's the electric vehicle manufacturer's are creating? Ot is it the jobs the battery manufacturer's are creating? Or the jobs that will be created to upgrade and improve the electrical grid?

You mean those jobs?
 

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What job loss's? The one's the electric vehicle manufacturer's are creating? Ot is it the jobs the battery manufacturer's are creating? Or the jobs that will be created to upgrade and improve the electrical grid?

You mean those jobs?
No, the jobs lost in the oil industry like refineries, transportation, production, exploration, marketing, and the manufacturing that goes along with all of that. Add in ICE repair shops and the auto manufacturing jobs lost, electrification of transportation will not replace those numbers. It'll be the steel and coal industry V2.0.
 

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What job loss's? The one's the electric vehicle manufacturer's are creating? Ot is it the jobs the battery manufacturer's are creating? Or the jobs that will be created to upgrade and improve the electrical grid?

You mean those jobs?
You might want to research where the batteries are manufactured, where the lithium and rare earth minerals in the batteries are mined. Will Mack hire more employees to make an electric truck that will only sell if the government mandates it? I would think it takes less workers to make an electric vehicle. Lot less parts so the impact will be jobs lost making internal combustion components over a large geographic area.

We live in a petroleum based economy like it or not. That letter was nothing more than 31 companies begging for free money. However.....I'm bettin it will create more government oversight and compliance committees. We could also discuss where the price of shipping goods will go with the tiny range of e-vehicles.

30% of heavy trucks by 2030? That's less than nine years! Do you have any idea how many big trucks operate out of Pennsylvania? It will take longer than that for development and to build the extra coal and gas plants to supply power.

There is also the chance hydrogen cell and ammonia hybrid technology may bypass pure electric. We have had electric vehicles since 1895, no one wants them.
 

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A lot more to the article should anyone wish to look it up and read it all. I only copy and pasted part of it.


SEPTA’s cracking battery buses raise questions about the future of electric transit
At the 2016 Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, executives from SEPTA gave free rides on gleaming new battery-powered buses. The PR stunt was meant to herald the transit agency’s intent to purchase 25 all-electric Proterra Catalyst buses, which, at that time, would have given SEPTA the largest fleet of its kind in the United States.
A bright green vehicle wrap proclaimed SEPTA had “plugged into an emissions free future.” A new lobby exhibit inside SEPTA headquarters showcased a decades-long “evolution” of its 1,500-vehicle-strong bus fleet — the vehicles from Proterra, the nation’s largest electric bus maker, were presented as the next step in that evolution.

But, today, what was meant to be the future of SEPTA’s fleet is closer to extinction than evolution.

It’s been nearly a year and a half since a passenger set foot inside one of SEPTA’s Proterra buses, which cost nearly a million dollars apiece
when they rolled out in 2019. Most are now gathering dust in a South Philly bus depot, riven by cracked chassis and other defects. The diesel and hybrid buses that SEPTA planned to replace with the all-electric fleet remain in service, with no timeline for the e-buses to return.

...
Proterra buses were also taken out of service in Duluth, Minnesota, after officials realized that hilly routes and heaters were draining batteries too quickly. A battery fleet from Chinese manufacturer BYD was taken out of service in Indianapolis for upgrades due to range issues, while officials in Albuquerque, New Mexico, returned 15 BYD buses for similar reasons. The CEO of a major battery-powered truck start-up, Nikola — the related sector Proterra is now hoping to expand into — resigned after a report accused him of lying about the technical capabilities of long range vehicles.
 

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You might want to research where the batteries are manufactured, where the lithium and rare earth minerals in the batteries are mined. Will Mack hire more employees to make an electric truck that will only sell if the government mandates it? I would think it takes less workers to make an electric vehicle. Lot less parts so the impact will be jobs lost making internal combustion components over a large geographic area.

We live in a petroleum based economy like it or not. That letter was nothing more than 31 companies begging for free money. However.....I'm bettin it will create more government oversight and compliance committees. We could also discuss where the price of shipping goods will go with the tiny range of e-vehicles.

30% of heavy trucks by 2030? That's less than nine years! Do you have any idea how many big trucks operate out of Pennsylvania? It will take longer than that for development and to build the extra coal and gas plants to supply power.

There is also the chance hydrogen cell and ammonia hybrid technology may bypass pure electric. We have had electric vehicles since 1895, no one wants them.
Exactly. Cart before the horse. No one is against clean technologies and a cleaner environment, but develop PRACTICAL technology first, THEN implement policies.
 

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Electric vehicles is the BIG LIE of the 21st century. Tell it enough and people believe it. It worked in Nazi Germany but only for a short time.
 

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Most EV's with any range at all require 220 volt to 440 volt for their version of "quick" charge. Imagine a entire city ramping up for this. This country already has rolling blackouts for power shortage in Hot Summers.

ELECTRICITY
Battery charge time

*10h at 220V
2021 Chevrolet Bolt EV · 2021 Audi e-tron · 2021 Tesla Model Y

*35h at 110V, 8 to 11h at 220V, 0.75 to 1h at 440V
2021 Nissan LEAF

*96.7h at 110V, 12h at 220V, 1.33h at 440V
2021 Tesla Model S

*4h at 220V
2021 Karma GS-6

*89h at 110V, 12h at 220V, 1.33h at 440V
2021 Tesla Model X
 

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I was up at the Mack plant the other day where I deliver freight.. There were battery powered macks being driven around.. Mack has a huge contract with New York City to provide battery powered garbage trucks... The guard up at the plant said they do not have all the bugs worked out of them yet...They are not sure of their range yet... There are alot of implications to charging batteries...
 

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Most EV's with any range at all require 220 volt to 440 volt for their version of "quick" charge. Imagine a entire city ramping up for this. This country already has rolling blackouts for power shortage in Hot Summers.

ELECTRICITY
Battery charge time
*10h at 220V

2021 Chevrolet Bolt EV · 2021 Audi e-tron · 2021 Tesla Model Y

*35h at 110V, 8 to 11h at 220V, 0.75 to 1h at 440V
2021 Nissan LEAF

*96.7h at 110V, 12h at 220V, 1.33h at 440V
2021 Tesla Model S

*4h at 220V
2021 Karma GS-6

*89h at 110V, 12h at 220V, 1.33h at 440V
2021 Tesla Model X
Buzz....your numbers are the MAXIMUM time it takes to charge a battery from it's lowest (dead) possible charge. Do you run out of gas and then fill up your vehicle? Not so much.

And BTW, it can take 6 hours to charge a Testla.
 

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Battery cases cracking.....Testla batteries catching fire....limited range (250 miles) of most. Bla, bla, bla. How many miles did a person get from a Model T? How many times did the Model T get a flat during a trip? How smooth was the Model T ride?

This "stuff" is in it's infancy.

BTW, Mercedes has stopped all funding in it's internal combustion engine development. All those R&D $$$ are focused on electric development.

Model T......meet electric.
 

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Buzz....your numbers are the MAXIMUM time it takes to charge a battery from it's lowest (dead) possible charge. Do you run out of gas and then fill up your vehicle? Not so much.

And BTW, it can take 6 hours to charge a Testla.
And it takes about 5 minutes to fill a tank of a gasoline tank when the needle is on empty. I will take minutes over hours any day to fill my fuel tank.
 

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Never owned one never will. I have driven a hybrid Ford Escape, didn't like it.
An automobile or truck should have the ability to rattle windows, if one is so inclined.😀
 
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Buzz....your numbers are the MAXIMUM time it takes to charge a battery from it's lowest (dead) possible charge. Do you run out of gas and then fill up your vehicle? Not so much.

And BTW, it can take 6 hours to charge a Testla.
Buzz....your numbers are the MAXIMUM time it takes to charge a battery from it's lowest (dead) possible charge. Do you run out of gas and then fill up your vehicle? Not so much.

And BTW, it can take 6 hours to charge a Testla.
and if your traveling to Fl and have to try and find a motel to plug into 110, it can take 89 hours to fully recharge it..... to drive what ? Another 300/400 miles ? Nothing like sitting at a motel 3 1/2 days waiting for it to full charge, so you can drive another 6 hours and wait 3 1/2 more days......... sounds pretty reasonable to me.
 

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....China is THE TOP manufacturer of electric vehicle batteries...no jobs for USA.
Mining and drilling for resources to make THESE ELETRIC CAR BATTERIES will not be done in the USA..remember oldaz biden put a stop to it here.

How far does a diesel big rig travel before filling up?

TESLA seems to be on track..



...the only issue I see with these is all that aerodynamic skirting on these rigs will be ripped off on all the POS PA roadways
 
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