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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Lyman Deer Stalker and the wedge the holds the barrel to the stock has become lose and I actually lost one. Looking for input to tighten up the fit or something. Thanks
 

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The lug on the barrel that it goes thru, tap it in the middle to dent it inwards a little, it is soft and bends easily. Will grab the wedge.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Someone told me there is a solution to this in the instructions but I bought it used and didn't get the instructions.
 

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The correct method is to bend the lug, only if you were EXTREMELY mechanically challenged would you ruin it, it is a VERY easy fix. You can bend the wedge pin, and again bend the wedge pin, and again bend the wedge pin, it will loosen again quite quickly as it straightens out because you are putting lateral pressure on the flats when it is assembled. If it is bent there is only one right way to put it back in, the wrong way will have both the barrel and wedge loose. The amount of bend changes the pressure between the stock and barrel, more bend equals more pressure, varying the stock to barrel pressure isn't a good thing and you might damage the escutcheon with excess pressure from recoil. Stating the obvious, bending the pin causes it to go through the stock not straight, there will now be excessive pressure on the far side escutcheon when you push/tap it through, it can and if it hangs up you can knock the screws right out of the stock. Bending the lug keeps everything in straight factory alignment, the straight wedge is merely pinched in the lug.
 

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Anyone that has 2 wedge pins knows the problems of attempting to fix it by bending the wedges. If the rear one falls out and you bend it, then right at assembly the front falls out. Bend the front enough to keep it in and the rear immediately falls out. Get it balanced and now there is a specific pin for the rear and one for the front, both of which have to be put in the correct bend orientation. Correct fix is to dent in the lug.

From the Lyman manual.
 

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I agree the Wedge needs a slight bend. Lyman's instruction is to put the Wedge in from the right side but my experience is that installing the Wedge from the left side resolves the problem.
 

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I had a guy tell me that if you have a little play in the wedge and it is loose, to take a piece of lead and hammer it flat, and work it in thickness, till it will be a shim. Then place it under the barrel near the back, it acts as a shim and will tighten a wedge pin. My only concern was the torque it would place on the barrel may cause accuracy problems.
 

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In days of yore, with the wedges in shotgun forearms, the wedges had slots milled most of the way from one end to the other. With the barrel out of the way, a tack or screw was placed through the slot in the wedge, to keep it from falling out. or just getting lost while cleaning the gun.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I didn't think of this but after tightening the barrel lug my rifle shoots about 6 inches higher. So I'm assuming that if you bent the wedge and the wedge continued to unbend over time the groups would move as well. Shot 6 bullets today and at 75 yrds. they grouped about 4 inches but high. Six because that's all I can get without cleaning. 90 ff and .490 round ball.
 

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If you over bend the lug it is harder to fix than straightening a wedge pin.
 

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If you over bend the lug it is harder to fix than straightening a wedge pin.
EXTREMELY EXTREMELY easy, put in a flat screwdriver and wiggle it a little, SUPER simple!
 
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