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Discussion Starter #1
I'm hoping for a little bit of guidance from you seasoned lyman shooters I have seen post on this board.

I am going to be purchasing a new flintlock here in the next couple weeks. I am set on the great plains rifle in .50 caliber because all the stuff I currently have is in .50, I just cant decide between the standard 1:60 twist or the faster 1:32 hunter barrel. Typically, from what I've seen the most they vary is about 10-15 dollars depending on where you buy it...so cost really isn't an issue. It will be a deer hunting rifle that I plan to shoot throughout throughout the year.

For those of you that shoot them, what would you say are the pros and cons between the 2? Is there a conical that will shoot out of the 1:60 that will allow you to shoot that conical and the recommended roundball? I'm really leaning that way, but the more I read about the hunter the more I'm kind of intrigued by it.

While we're at it...what are you shooting out of your plains rifle? From what I can tell they tend to favor a pretty thick patch for round ball shooters(.018 pillowticking) and a .490 ball? I figure 80 grains of 2f goex will be a good place to start shooting it. Do the lymans favor a specific flint? I know my traditions seem to like the fuller black English flints.

I thank you all for your time and input, I'm just looking to gather everything I need that way when it comes in I can hit the ground running.
 

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I've got a Lyman GPR in .54 caliber. Its got the 1/60 twist barrel because I only shoot round balls. I use 80 grains of 2fg and it groups nicely with that load. I've used that same load in my semi custom Lancaster rifle and it will easily kill a deer. I use .018-.020 patching in mine. I've used both English flints and cut agates but prefer the English flints because they seem to throw more sparks. The curved butt plate does dig into the shoulder so be mindful of that. Of all the factory made guns I've seen/used, T/C and Lyman are about the best. Pedersoli is also a good make but I have no experience with them.
 

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My Lyman .50 cal 1-60 GPR shoots a 240 gr Hornady PA conical as accurately as a patched roundball with hunting loads. I shoot 70 gr of 3f with the Hornady
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you so much for your inpit fellas. The 240 grain conical....is that pretty close to the Buffalo ballet?
 

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Buffalo bullets are hard to find since they stopped making them. You can find the Hornady bullets at a number of places.
 

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My son shoots 370 grain maxi balls from his .50 cal Traditions flintlock, again using 80 grains of 2fg. Groups nicely with that load and will flip a deer on its arse. I have a Lyman mold, and we just made up a batch for him tonight for the upcoming season.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well I think I'm going to go with the standard 1:60. I'm going to get the 240 grain PA conicals and start at 80 grains of 2f. I am going to get some round balls and patches too but if I can get the conicals to shoot good enough I'll stick with those for this year and spend next year finding the patched round ball load the gun prefers. Thanks again for your help
 

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Well I think I'm going to go with the standard 1:60. I'm going to get the 240 grain PA conicals and start at 80 grains of 2f. I am going to get some round balls and patches too but if I can get the conicals to shoot good enough I'll stick with those for this year and spend next year finding the patched round ball load the gun prefers. Thanks again for your help
Trust me pal 80 grains is plenty. Don't fall for that Bravo Sierra that you can't take a deer with less than 100 grains of powder. Total crap.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well I think I'm going to go with the standard 1:60. I'm going to get the 240 grain PA conicals and start at 80 grains of 2f. I am going to get some round balls and patches too but if I can get the conicals to shoot good enough I'll stick with those for this year and spend next year finding the patched round ball load the gun prefers. Thanks again for your help
Trust me pal 80 grains is plenty. Don't fall for that Bravo Sierra that you can't take a deer with less than 100 grains of powder. Total crap.
I agree 100% I only shoot 70 out of my deerhunter, I just think the longer barrel of the gpr would benefit from the extra powder
 

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The Great Plans Hunter has a SHALLOW cut rifling made for conical shooting.
The Great Plains Rifle has deeper cut rifling made for shooting RB's.(.018-.020 patch)
The rate of twist will let you shoot more volume of powder and still have accuracy of 1 1/2" or less at 50yds.
I have 1:48 that shoot every bit as good as 1:60,1:66,and 1:72 just not as much volume of powder.The Great Plains Rifle has a longer barrel to give you that longer burn time for higher volumes.
Match the depth of rifling with the projectile you want to shoot but the RB's kill just as good as the expensive conicals.
Remember . . . . . . Nothing lives with a 1/2" hole in the heart or lungs no matter what made it!
I have killed plenty of deer with 50grs of powder but ya gotta hit em in the boiler!
 

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I agree 100% I only shoot 70 out of my deerhunter, I just think the longer barrel of the gpr would benefit from the extra powder
I don't know about that. My Lancaster has a 42 inch barrel and I still only use 80 grains of powder in it. More than that in a shorter barrel such as on a GPR (32 in barrel IIRC), and you will most likely see some blown out the muzzle without being burned, thus wasted.

I see guys every year at the range shooting 100 plus grains in short barreled guns, and you can see the black on the ground in the dirt, and especially when there is a little snow on the ground in front of their shooting benches. Most of them don't even realize they're wasting powder, as they're afflicted with max load disease. .
 
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