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Discussion Starter #1
I am interested in getting a beagle to hunt rabbits, looking for a pup or a started dog, will be an inside dog also. Looking for someone in Northwest Pa who is a good breeder, doesn't need to have papers just want a good dog that will hunt on his/her own any help or direction will be appreciated.
 

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I might be a little off base here, giving advice where the original poster isn't asking for advice. But it has been my experience that if you want your beagle to hunt, you need to keep the beagle outside and not let the kids and family play with the dog.
Now maybe I am wrong, but with all the dogs I have had in the past 45 years, the only dogs that worked out were the ones that were treated like hunting dogs and not the ones that was treated like family pets.
There is a predisposition that once the dog has been played with, it won't want to hunt. And when you take it out to hunt it will become confused and want to play and you will end up with a screwed up dog that doesn't hunt.

The exception to the rule is a bird dog ( Katie ) my brother in law bought 25 years ago. The dog lived in my parents house and slept on a bed and ate people food and had all kinds of problems with its skin, fur, allergies, female parts etc.

The dog loved to hunt, but wouldn't take commands from anyone except my sister - that took care of the dog.

She was not the sister that my brother in law was married to, and she did not hunt!.

One day I followed him to a field and hunted birds with him. When it was time to go home, the Katie jumped into my truck - not his!
Katie knew that I was the person that fed her and petted her and played with her and her master was just the owner by virtue of a bill of sale.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Some of the best rabbit dogs I have hunted under were indoor dogs, I think it's more of how much you hunt with them and the drive the dog has to hunt. If I had a pack of dogs maybe but just looking for a single dog right now. Black powder I'm only five minutes from Blooming Valley do you have any other info on this guy, thanks for the replies.
 

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the beagles I have had, have all been inside/outside family pets and best friends. all were rabbit hunting machines and all business when you started putting on your bibs or rattled the hunting collar. give me a couple days and I will stop and get a name and phone number for you.
 

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Trail said:
I might be a little off base here, giving advice where the original poster isn't asking for advice. But it has been my experience that if you want your beagle to hunt, you need to keep the beagle outside and not let the kids and family play with the dog.
This is so far off base! My dog is an indoor dog, even sleeps in my bed! He still knows when it's time to hunt. Still chases rabbits, still comes out of the brush covered in blood and a cut-up face from trying to find the rabbit. In fact, I have noticed that my dog is MUCH more loyal than my dad's outside dogs were to him. All depends on the dog I am sure, but I don't believe for one second that indoor dogs are automatically not hunting dogs.
 

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Back in the 80`s I had a few good beagles, belonged to a local Beagle Club, ran field trials and judged brace trails.
...From my own experience we kenneled our dogs outside. I tried to raze one once as an inside dog, it was a pup. The dang thing chewed up everything it could. When it finally chewed on my wife`s good shoes. It wore out its welcome and back in the kennel she went.
...But as it turned out that dog was a helluva good rabbit dog, so I`m sure it would have been just as good if I would have kept in the house also...So I say go for it and keep it inside if you want, but train it well and keep it away from your wife`s shoes.....
 

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A good beagle is a good beagle whether it is kept iside or out. All mine were inside dogs and they hunted hard (summer in trials and when fun running) and rabbit season under the gun. Three out of 4 are field champs and excellent gundogs and the fourth just needs a win to be a field champ and is also an excellent gundog. They retrieve for the most part and the sire of two of these dogs didn't always need the rabbit to be shot before he retrieved it. So, I would think twice about repeating old wives tales as advice without investigating the truth first.
 

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I might be a little off base here, giving advice where the original poster isn't asking for advice. But it has been my experience that if you want your beagle to hunt, you need to keep the beagle outside and not let the kids and family play with the dog.
I don't think you were off base for offering advice however I think your advice was way off base and has no base of truth.

My last beagle was a house dog and more my wife's dog than my dog. She don't hunt so he hunted with me. The only problem I ever had with this hound is sometimes he would not want to quit when I did and I could not go home without her dog. Waugh!
 

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Trail said:
I might be a little off base here, giving advice where the original poster isn't asking for advice. But it has been my experience that if you want your beagle to hunt, you need to keep the beagle outside and not let the kids and family play with the dog.
Now maybe I am wrong, but with all the dogs I have had in the past 45 years, the only dogs that worked out were the ones that were treated like hunting dogs and not the ones that was treated like family pets.
There is a predisposition that once the dog has been played with, it won't want to hunt. And when you take it out to hunt it will become confused and want to play and you will end up with a screwed up dog that doesn't hunt.

The exception to the rule is a bird dog ( Katie ) my brother in law bought 25 years ago. The dog lived in my parents house and slept on a bed and ate people food and had all kinds of problems with its skin, fur, allergies, female parts etc.

The dog loved to hunt, but wouldn't take commands from anyone except my sister - that took care of the dog.

She was not the sister that my brother in law was married to, and she did not hunt!.

One day I followed him to a field and hunted birds with him. When it was time to go home, the Katie jumped into my truck - not his!
Katie knew that I was the person that fed her and petted her and played with her and her master was just the owner by virtue of a bill of sale.
Ah...ok...I'll keep that in mind.
 

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Trail said:
I might be a little off base here, giving advice where the original poster isn't asking for advice. But it has been my experience that if you want your beagle to hunt, you need to keep the beagle outside and not let the kids and family play with the dog.
Now maybe I am wrong, but with all the dogs I have had in the past 45 years, the only dogs that worked out were the ones that were treated like hunting dogs and not the ones that was treated like family pets.
There is a predisposition that once the dog has been played with, it won't want to hunt. And when you take it out to hunt it will become confused and want to play and you will end up with a screwed up dog that doesn't hunt.

The exception to the rule is a bird dog ( Katie ) my brother in law bought 25 years ago. The dog lived in my parents house and slept on a bed and ate people food and had all kinds of problems with its skin, fur, allergies, female parts etc.

The dog loved to hunt, but wouldn't take commands from anyone except my sister - that took care of the dog.

She was not the sister that my brother in law was married to, and she did not hunt!.

One day I followed him to a field and hunted birds with him. When it was time to go home, the Katie jumped into my truck - not his!
Katie knew that I was the person that fed her and petted her and played with her and her master was just the owner by virtue of a bill of sale.
This is probably the biggest piece of misinformation I typically hear. I have no idea how this thought got started. Maybe a bunch of old timers sitting around going "If ya don't keep your dog in a pen he ain't worth a lick when it comes to hunting. They need to be tough and only care about hunting". Who really knows. Bottom line is though that I can find plenty of spoiled house beagles that would run the tail off of kenneled dogs. The dog decides how good they are going to be along with time spent in the field. Where they sleep at night doesn't make a lick of difference.
 

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We have had several that were house dogs and excellent hunters.
I will add however, if the dogs doesn't work out as a hunter, it is a lot harder to get the family to let go of a pet than an outside hunting dog if the time comes to move the dog.

John L
 

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Rabbit Runner said:
We have had several that were house dogs and excellent hunters.
I will add however, if the dogs doesn't work out as a hunter, it is a lot harder to get the family to let go of a pet than an outside hunting dog if the time comes to move the dog.

John L
Agreed. So the moral of John's story....Don't get married.
 

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Smoke'n Mack said:
Rabbit Runner said:
We have had several that were house dogs and excellent hunters.
I will add however, if the dogs doesn't work out as a hunter, it is a lot harder to get the family to let go of a pet than an outside hunting dog if the time comes to move the dog.

John L
Agreed. So the moral of John's story....Don't get married.
Shane too late for us , LOL

Darn dog on the bed, have to sleep on the couch now. LOL
 

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Rabbit Runner said:
We have had several that were house dogs and excellent hunters.
I will add however, if the dogs doesn't work out as a hunter, it is a lot harder to get the family to let go of a pet than an outside hunting dog if the time comes to move the dog.
This is, I am sure, very true, but for me if the dog doesn't work out as a hunter BUT has good house manners, I can stand to keep them as a pet. I would just have to get a second (or third!) hound, that's all
 

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Smoke'n Mack said:
Rabbit Runner said:
We have had several that were house dogs and excellent hunters.
I will add however, if the dogs doesn't work out as a hunter, it is a lot harder to get the family to let go of a pet than an outside hunting dog if the time comes to move the dog.

John L
Agreed. So the moral of John's story....Don't get married.

Wish I got that advice years ago.
 

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psychobeagle12 said:
Rabbit Runner said:
We have had several that were house dogs and excellent hunters.
I will add however, if the dogs doesn't work out as a hunter, it is a lot harder to get the family to let go of a pet than an outside hunting dog if the time comes to move the dog.
This is, I am sure, very true, but for me if the dog doesn't work out as a hunter BUT has good house manners, I can stand to keep them as a pet. I would just have to get a second (or third!) hound, that's all
And then you can buy a new house and build a puppy starting pen, an of course you'll need to add about 10 grand to the mortgage so you can build a nice 5 bay heated kennel, because you can't keep all of them in the house.
Who would be nuts enough to do all that ??????

UMMMMM OOOPS


John L
 

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psychobeagle12 said:
This is, I am sure, very true, but for me if the dog doesn't work out as a hunter BUT has good house manners, I can stand to keep them as a pet. I would just have to get a second (or third!) hound, that's all
So what I am hearing is you are not allowed to get rid of the dog either!!
 
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