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Discussion Starter #1
I'm lookin for a good male 13" jump dog. I mean something that will get in the brush and tear it up. Any suggestions what bloodlines are known for good jump dogs or any info on who may have 1 there lookin to get rid of. Don't have to be right at this moment. 2 yrs old or younger if possible. Thanks for any suggestions.
 

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Cope, I wish you the best of luck but a "true" good jump dog is few and far between. The problem is that when someone finally gets their hands one one you'll have to put a lot of green in front of them to make them even think of giving them up. As far as bloodlines go I can't be of much help there. I do know that I run one of Branko's dogs and she'll go in just about anything. Granted, she has a TON of hunt and desire but she doesn't have all of the smarts to think like a rabbit and know what type of cover they prefer. To me that's the difference between a dog with extreme hunt and a true jump dog. I would suggest looking at beaglesforsaleonline.com and the american beagler forums. Whatever you do make sure you see the dog run before you take it home.
 

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I don't think there are far and few between at all. I have 11 beagles and they all can hunt and jump their own rabbit. When I dump the dogs out of the box they go right into the cover and hunt every spot that looks like it will hold a rabbit. I'm sure some of the other guys on here with good dogs will do the same. If a dogs not going to get in the brush and hunt it won't last in most serious houndsmen's kennels.
 

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That's what i want, when i drop the tailgate i want to see dirt fly. Nothing ticks me off more than watching my dogs skirt a good potential bunny hide out. It's almost like they get in a mood, sometimes they will jump right in and sometimes they won't. I want at least 1 dog, that when it see's heavy cover, will head right for it.
 

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snowshoe said:
I don't think there are far and few between at all. I have 11 beagles and they all can hunt and jump their own rabbit. When I dump the dogs out of the box they go right into the cover and hunt every spot that looks like it will hold a rabbit. I'm sure some of the other guys on here with good dogs will do the same. If a dogs not going to get in the brush and hunt it won't last in most serious houndsmen's kennels.
+1
 

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Hey cope, I might be able to help you out. A few club members have small beagles.I am unemployed as of yesterday so I'll be running there a lot.I'll ask around. If you want to run your pup at the club I can take you as a guest one time. Rabbits are running big circles right now .give me a call.
 

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snowshoe said:
I don't think there are far and few between at all. I have 11 beagles and they all can hunt and jump their own rabbit. When I dump the dogs out of the box they go right into the cover and hunt every spot that looks like it will hold a rabbit. I'm sure some of the other guys on here with good dogs will do the same. If a dogs not going to get in the brush and hunt it won't last in most serious houndsmen's kennels.
I guess we differ on what we consider a good jump dog. Yeah, my dogs hit the brush the second the tailgate drops and they hunt it hard. They'll go non-stop with their nose to the ground and aren't afraid to go in anything. To me, that's a dog with a lot of hunt but not a true jump dog. Yes, they'll jump their fair share of rabbits but only as a result of hunting hard. To me a jump dog not only hunts like is tail is on fire but uses his head and eyes too. They just seem to know where a rabbit is and won't pass any by. They don't waste time sniffing an area that is less thick than the others. They ignore them and seem to know they won't hold a rabbit without wasting time sniffing around. I'm talking about places that are still brushy but you can obviously see into them. A jump dog will make quick work of it and move on while a dog with a lot of hunt will work it out. I think a lot of houndsmen have packs with tons of hunt but consider them "jump" dogs. Not picking one way or the other here either
This is just my interpretation of it, that's all.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ok, a good jump dog or a helluva hunter, thats what i want! I only have 2 beagles, and dont trial, so im not sure on the terms.
 

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Bearklr said:
snowshoe said:
I don't think there are far and few between at all. I have 11 beagles and they all can hunt and jump their own rabbit. When I dump the dogs out of the box they go right into the cover and hunt every spot that looks like it will hold a rabbit. I'm sure some of the other guys on here with good dogs will do the same. If a dogs not going to get in the brush and hunt it won't last in most serious houndsmen's kennels.
I guess we differ on what we consider a good jump dog. Yeah, my dogs hit the brush the second the tailgate drops and they hunt it hard. They'll go non-stop with their nose to the ground and aren't afraid to go in anything. To me, that's a dog with a lot of hunt but not a true jump dog. Yes, they'll jump their fair share of rabbits but only as a result of hunting hard. To me a jump dog not only hunts like is tail is on fire but uses his head and eyes too. They just seem to know where a rabbit is and won't pass any by. They don't waste time sniffing an area that is less thick than the others. They ignore them and seem to know they won't hold a rabbit without wasting time sniffing around. I'm talking about places that are still brushy but you can obviously see into them. A jump dog will make quick work of it and move on while a dog with a lot of hunt will work it out. I think a lot of houndsmen have packs with tons of hunt but consider them "jump" dogs. Not picking one way or the other here either
This is just my interpretation of it, that's all.

Yeah what I said.... a hound "jumps" game by hunting hard...period. If a dog don't hunt hard it won't jump game. If you think a hound can rationalize where a rabbit is sitting and where one isn't your crazy. It's just plain old nose to the ground hard hunting. I've been running beagles my whole life and after 42yrs I still haven't seen a beagle scratch his head trying to decide where a rabbit might be sitting. I really think your just a little confused here. If their noses aren't on the ground very few rabbits are hitting the game bag. I'll keep an eye on my hounds next week in Maine to see if they have discussions on where a hare might be sitting and not wasting time sniffing around.lol.
 

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Wow, you're just a regular tater salad there aren't you snowshoe. I guess with 42yrs under your belt that doesn't entitle me to an opinion. If I remember correctly I never said their noses wouldn't be on the ground but I guess you decided to interpret it that way to make a funny...ha ha here's your cookie. That being said, my point was that a good jump dog just has better instint than a hard hunter. Did I say that they rationalize and discuss with each other where a rabbit is? No, but I guess your post was funnier by ignoring what I said so you could belittle someone else's opinion. However, if you go back and read you'll see that my INTERPRETATION (which last I checked I was allowed to have) was a dog that had the INSTINCT to know as much of where NOT to look as where to look. If I take one of your hard hunting nose to the ground hare huntin' Maine livin' jump dogs to a Walmart and he keeps is "nose to the ground" for 2 hours in their parking lot he's not what I'd call a good jump dog. Of course, based on your definition he would be because all it takes is good hunt right? Now if you took that hard huntin dog to a parking lot and he looked at you like you were nuts then he would have the INSTINCT that I'm referring to and you're laughing about. So please don't misinterpret my post as if I said sniffing around in general was "wasting time". Sniffing around in the wrong places IS. But hey, anytime you want to hit up a Walmart just let me know I'd be happy to watch your dogs tear up the asphalt.
 

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Your post makes no sense to me at all....if you want to see some good hounds run let me know. I'm sure they will prove to be great "jump dogs" by hunting hard!
 

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Snowshoe, I've seen plenty of good hounds run and I'm not degrading your dogs at all. I figured I'd just finish the game you decided to start. My post makes perfect sense if you could have an open mind and discuss a topic rather than be sarcastic of other members when your point of view doesn't match theirs. I have a feeling it doesn't make sense to you because you can't find a sarcastic comment to come back with.
 

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ridegway, I'm with you on that one. I've had honest conversation about opposing ideas on here for years and love a good discussion. What I don't like is someone trying to make me look like a fool when my interpretation of something is different than theirs. I've valued snowshoe's posts on here for quite some time and learned quite a bit from him so I'm not belittleing his experience by any means. But as you can see my initial post was MY interpretation and I even stated that fact and said there could be different views and didn't make fun of his view. I'm not the one who got their panties in a bunch because someone didn't agree with me and play the smart[censored]sarcasm card. I'll be done with this post now unless the discussion moves above a 3rd grade level.
 

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I quit rabbit hunting a few years ago but still small game hunt. Any dogs I had would hunt all available cover. They worked at getting a rabbit going. I have seen them check the wind and then go into a multiflora bush and rout out a rabbit. I think if you get a dog bred for hunting and keep it in the woods as much as possible you will end up with a good dog. They all take a lot of running to keep them up. I tried to line breed and was real happy with my dogs. When I sold a pup it most likely if given the field time would be running rabbits by 5 months. Then they keep improving over time
 

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Bearklr...here's the deal. If a dog don't have desire to hunt it will never jump a rabbit. Dogs will learn to hunt cover because of conditioning and time in the field....but a dog won't ever jump a rabbit if it don't have desire to hunt. They can't think and decide where to hunt...they do because you dump them in cover. You can think what you want but that what makes a good jump dog...one that HUNTS!
 

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I agree with you 100% snowshoe, that's what I've been trying to say. A hard hunting dog is absolutely needed to make a good jump dog. I just think that a true jump dog has some instinct that a typical hard hunting dog doesn't. I've seen tons of dogs that have their nose to the ground the second we drop the tailgate. They hunt hard all day and jump rabbits because we make sure they stay in the cover. Then I've seen what I call jump dogs that hunt the same way with one big difference. We don't need to make sure they stay in the cover. They've learned that the thicker the better when it comes to jumping rabbits and search out the nasty stuff on their own. This is quite evident when I run at our club. It's checkerboarded for our trials so you can easily see the difference. Put 10 hard hunting dogs on the ground and watch. The hard hunters will spend just as much time running the trails as they do in the brush. The jump dogs hit the brush and only come out when they're heading to the next thicket. Maybe you're lucky enough where you hunt to have solid thickets that hold rabbits just about everywhere but down here we don't. We have a lot of fields and open areas with small patches that hold the rabbits. If the dogs hunted hard in the open areas that obviously don't hold rabbits we'd probably cover half the ground we normally do and jump far fewer rabbits. Just my opinion based on my experiences. We just have different opinions, no big deal.
 
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