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I've been looking at quite a few crossbows lately and have settled on the Barnett Quad 400 it has a 15.5" power stroke. All the Parker's had a power stroke of 12.5 or under. I did like the Parker bows but I have a friend who keeps telling me to stick to getting a longer power stroke bow. I don't know anything about crossbow's or power stroke.Can someone straighten me out on what power stroke is and how it's measured.
 

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Powerstroke is basically the distance the bow string is drawn back. Crossbows are generally 9-15 inches while compounds, I think are around 19-24 inches. Crossbows have heavier draw weights which will give you more energy per inch of your stroke. Compounds have lighter draw weights, but are drawn back a longer distance. Just remember, how far is the same as how hard. Hope this helps.
 

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There are bows with short power strokes that are fast and there are bows with long power strokes that are slow.

Power stroke on a crossbow is the measurement from where the string sits on the rail when uncocked to where the string sits when cocked. This is the power stroke.

Bows with longer power strokes are harder to cock by hand or with a rope cocker because the leverage decreases towards the end of the draw. Using a crank device eliminates that factor.

I would buy the bow that is within your budget and feels right to you. Consider, warranties and customer service in your decision.
 

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What is said above is true. However, there are many other factors that come into play. Powerstroke isn't everything.

Some things to consider:
A bows efficiency is based on that bows ability to launch an arrow and for that arrow to maintain it's speed downrange. A crossbow with a 150 lb pull and short powerstroke, may do that job better than a 200 lb bow with a long powerstroke.

If the arrow whips off the barrel and the fletchings need to steer that arrow, it scrubs speed very fast. On the other hand if a similar bow (equal in every way) launches the same arrow, at the same speed off the barrel and it doesn't whip.... that equates to more energy being transferred to the arrow downrange.

All cams are not created equal. Cams are basically the machine that transfers the stored energy in the limbs to the arrow. A well engineered cam will transfer more of that energy to the arrow.

If all things are equal, the bow with the longer powerstroke will transfer more power to the arrow. However, the other factors mentioned, are points to be considered.

I'll leave limb design out of this for now. It would turn into several pages and I've got to get to work.
 

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Headed to Arrowheads in the next week to pick up a Parker Tornado myself!!!! Been looking since the beginning of the year. Parker all the way!
 

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I tried 4 brands and for me Parker is just right, I have a tornado and an enforcer and they both shoot 1 inch at 25 yards which is my personal limit.Find one thats feels good when you shoulder it, shoot some if you can then decide.
Stan
 
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