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The 1967 film "The Dirty Dozen" sported an All Star cast of World War II veterans. One of the most popular films of its time, "The Dirty Dozen" still holds as one of the most successful war films ever made. The cast included: Lee Marvin, Robert Webber and Robert Ryan (US Marine Corps); Telly Savalas and George Kennedy (US Army); Charles Bronson (US Army Air Forces); Ernest Borgnine (US Navy) and Clint Walker (US Merchant Marine) as major players. Please take a moment to learn a little more about Lee Marvin. A genuine US Marine. Semper Fi.
Lee Marvin, of New York City New York, enlisted with the US Marine Corps Reserve on August 12, 1942 at the age of 18 years old. He enlisted with his father, Lamont (age 51) a decorated World War I veteran, in New York City and trained at Parris Island in South Carolina.
After completing Quartermaster School Marvin was promoted to Corporal but subsequently downgraded to Private First Class resulting from disciplinary issues. He
served with I Company, 3rd Battalion, 24th Marines, 4th Marine Division. On June 18, 1944, Marvin was wounded in action during the assault on Mount Tapochau during the Battle of Saipan. Lee was hit by incoming fire that severed his sciatic nerve in addition to severely damaging his foot. Even with these devastating injuries, Marvin was lucky as he was one of only six survivors from his unit of 247 men. (Source: USMC Archive)
After spending over a year in medical treatment at various naval hospitals he was given a full medical discharge. Despite his injury, he tried to reenlist but was turned down. Private First Class Marvin was decorated with the Purple Heart Medal, the Presidential Unit Citation, the American Campaign Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, the World War II Victory Medal, and the Combat Action Ribbon.
After the war Lee returned to upstate New York and worked various odd jobs until he established a successful acting career to include such works as The Big Heat, The Wild One, M Squad and The Dirty Dozen. In 1965 he won the Academy Award for Best actor for his role in Cat Ballou.
Lee Marvin passed away on August 29, 1987 at the age of 63. He was buried at Arlington National Cemetery with full military honors. Lest We Forget.
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You`re right , it was a good movie . I also liked Sgt York. Mostly because my late grandfather on my dad side of family was in WW1 over in the Argon Forest area. Also The LongDay, My moms late brother- in - law was part of the D- Day invasiion during WW2. I think that`s why I like the last two , because I have a connection to both of them.
 

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I recall seeing an interview he gave indicating he got shot in his rear and I believe one of his sergeants was also an actor. It might have been Captain Kangaroo Not sure
There are many urban legend's about Bob Keeshan's service in WWII, including that he fought along side Lee Marvin. In fact he enlisted near the end of the war and was still in training in the US when Japan surrendered... he never saw combat.
 

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There are many urban legend's about Bob Keeshan's service in WWII, including that he fought along side Lee Marvin. In fact he enlisted near the end of the war and was still in training in the US when Japan surrendered... he never saw combat.
He must have been very good at training, he still made 'captain'.
 

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Some of the funnest things I’ve learned was in the back seat of a car, ah those were the days.
I learned that sometimes when you're relaxing in the back seat of a car, a group of friends think it's cool to sneak up, and rock the car until it **** near tips over. :mad::mad::mad:
 

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There are many urban legend's about Bob Keeshan's service in WWII, including that he fought along side Lee Marvin. In fact he enlisted near the end of the war and was still in training in the US when Japan surrendered... he never saw combat.
For as old as I am, I can’t believe I remembered that interview with Johnny Carson. I just googled Keeshan and saw the information on the urban legend. why would Lee Marvin say what he did.
 
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