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Discussion Starter #1
I have used them before although I do not own one. I feel they are amazing but their are many differant models on their site. I was hoping for some feedback. For instance, are the diamond stones that much better then the regular stones?
 

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Like some would have you believe about fly fishing, sharpening a knife is not complicated stuff....the Lansky setup gives you the right angle-something practice with a bench stone will quickly teach you....

I use a coarse stone to start dull blades with then switch to a fine one to create a final edge....keep the stone moistened with a little water....

The best thing to do is to not let the knife get really dull....the angle you use is very slight....just imagine slicing a very thin piece from each swipe of the blade on the stone....I keep my everyday blades honed by occasionally swiping them on a fine stone from time to time...

I don't think diamond stones are needed but that's just me....
 

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I use the regular stones. I've never tried or used the diamond stones.

When I'm done you can shave the hair off your arms....or anything else you want to. I warn my wife when I sharpen her kitchen knifes so she doesn't slice a piece of herself off.

Dave
 

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Been using them for about 15-20 years now. About 10 years ago I bought a second set with two extra stones (X-coarse and X-fine) and sent my standard set (3 stones) to camp.

I've always used the regular stones with very good results. Had to replace the coarse stone in the original set from cutting new angles on too many blades for the first time.

I trap (lots of skinning) and butcher my own deer so the Lansky sees lots of use, daily use during trapping season.
 

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winchesterbob said:
Like some would have you believe about fly fishing, sharpening a knife is not complicated stuff....the Lansky setup gives you the right angle-something practice with a bench stone will quickly teach you....
Using a regular stone or steel is certainly a faster and more convenient way to sharpen and guys who know how to use them can put a very sharp edge on in a short time.

The Lansky and systems like it allow you to choose an angle for different types of blades and duplicate that angle stroke after stroke and sharpening after sharpening. That type of precision is what creates extremely sharp edges that I don't believe can be duplicated freehand. At least not by me...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
i have seen guys at gun shows who do nothing but sharpen steel blades for a living that will tell you they can't duplicate a lansky.....i know their are some out there but i have no desire to acquire that amount of precision. i can sharpen a blade free hand that will shave hair but i can't do it very fast and i usually like to keep my knives really sharp at all times.
 

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I use the Lansky kit that I bought about 15 years ago. The kitchen knives, I can sharpen. Some special purpose knives i get really sharp.

Then there are the hunting knives...A Schrade Sharpfinger and a WWII K-Bar that I inherited from my grandfather. Those 2 my GF calls "Scary Sharp".

My kit only has 3 regular stones.
 

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DaveT said:
I use the regular stones. I've never tried or used the diamond stones.

When I'm done you can shave the hair off your arms....or anything else you want to. I warn my wife when I sharpen her kitchen knifes so she doesn't slice a piece of herself off.

Dave
Same here, the regular stones. Coarse, medium, and fine. I did the wife's kitchen knives once. She will not let me do them again! She said they were tooooooooo SHARP!!!
I had my set for about ten years now. Ill buy another when needed!
 

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I have used one for years, and yes I do have the diamond stones. Two reasons, they cut faster and last longer.

I also use ceramic rods for honing and burr removal.

A good edge for a hunting knife is a double angle of 11 degrees on the course stone and then finish with a medium and fine at 22 degrees. Too small an angle on the cutting edge will not stand up long and the edge will dull quickly.

An excellent read.

A few of my "old timers":

 

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I have a Lansky but don't have the patience to sit there for any period of time to sharpen the knife. I have a friend who loves to sharpen knives and uses a Lanskey. I usually give him mine to do. I always say there are 3 stages of sharp; sharp, scarey sharp and Eddie sharp! He once did my black handled buck knife. It was so sharp, I skinned three deer and butchered two with it before it needed touched up again. He just uses the regular stone blades. Once you do the initial sharpening that sets that bevel, a knife will resharpen pretty quickly with the Lanskey.
 

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I have used a Lansky for some time now, and it does make my knifes wicked sharp. here is a tip, write down the angles on your different knifes that way there is not any guessing. I have used the diamond and the regular ones and not really noticed much of a difference
 

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A mouse pad and 400/800/1000 grit automative paper will get any knife scary sharp

Plus it will put a natural convex edge on the blade which is more efficant than the v bevel the lansky puts on.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
i have no desire to use a mouse bad and automotive paper...lol
 
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