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Well the deer farming industry weights in.

Meanwhile, the hunting for everyone else is in the cross hairs.


It is here in Pennsylvania, and the deer farms introduced it here. Wasn't intentional, the farmers didn't want it, but that doesn't change the facts. Point of origination in PA was a deer farm(s).


Meanwhile the PA Department of Ag continues to drag their feet and respond in a lackluster fashion.
 

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Bluetick said:
Point of origination in PA was a deer farm(s).
Point of origin in lots of states has been deer enclosures. In fact, the very first case on record was inside an enclosure.

Way back in 1967, CWD was first identified in captive mule deer at the Colorado Division of Wildlife, Foothills Wildlife Research Facility in Fort Collins, Colorado. It wasn’t until 1981 that CWD was found in a wild animal, an elk also in Colorado, marking the first documented case of CWD in a wild cervid. All cervids (antlered ruminants) (elk, moose, caribou, whitetails, blacktails, mule deer, etc.) are susceptible to it.

The first documented case in whitetails occurred in 2001 when South Dakota discovered CWD in wild whitetail deer. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources detected CWD in wild whitetail deer, the state's first documented case of CWD in 2002. That same year CWD was identified in New Mexico (wild mule deer), Minnesota (captive elk), Illinois (wild whitetail), and Alberta (captive whitetail).

Today, 21 states and two Canadian provinces have confirmed cases of CWD. At least 19 have cases in wild cervid populations.

Steve.
 

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Wonder why only one deer will come down with the disease in a captive deer herd, when they are in such close proximity of each other ? You'd think if it was that contagious they all would test positive. Maybe some have a natural imunity ?
 

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Gitzit said:
You'd think if it was that contagious they all would test positive.
There is no test unless a deer has died, and no one really knows how contagious it is -- so in this case one of the fears is what we don't know. Other fears: there is no defense against it, no way to know whether the deer are exposed to it, no known way to diagnose if a deer has it, when a deer gets it, it's always fatal, and when the prions are present in an environment, they are virtually permanent.

The presence of these fears doesn't necessarily mean anyone believes it is highly contagious. But scientists have to be concerned that it could be highly contagious. There is still much biologists don't know about it. They don't know why one deer succumbs to it and another doesn't, but if the reason one deer dies becomes a factor for all deer, it could be devastating. Just because it hasn't decimated a herd yet doesn't mean it won't.

Steve.
 

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Add the long latency period before symptoms show... coupled with the lack of a "live" test.
 

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Need to add - there is no test for urine used in scents either. Urine is, however, a means of spreading the prions.
 

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Everyday Hunter said:
Bluetick said:
Point of origination in PA was a deer farm(s).
Point of origin in lots of states has been deer enclosures. In fact, the very first case on record was inside an enclosure.

Way back in 1967, CWD was first identified in captive mule deer at the Colorado Division of Wildlife, Foothills Wildlife Research Facility in Fort Collins, Colorado. It wasn’t until 1981 that CWD was found in a wild animal, an elk also in Colorado, marking the first documented case of CWD in a wild cervid. All cervids (antlered ruminants) (elk, moose, caribou, whitetails, blacktails, mule deer, etc.) are susceptible to it.

The first documented case in whitetails occurred in 2001 when South Dakota discovered CWD in wild whitetail deer. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources detected CWD in wild whitetail deer, the state's first documented case of CWD in 2002. That same year CWD was identified in New Mexico (wild mule deer), Minnesota (captive elk), Illinois (wild whitetail), and Alberta (captive whitetail).

Today, 21 states and two Canadian provinces have confirmed cases of CWD. At least 19 have cases in wild cervid populations.

Steve.
of course it was first found in a deer farm...why would they be looking for something in the wild
 

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I think Keith is a tool, no doubt. But I do respect Kroll.
 
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