The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,391 Posts
Yeah, and the shale industry runs a squeaky clean operation.......all that energy independence being shipped to China as we speak, all those jobs for residents of PA, Companies stealing royalty money through loopholes to make the people who leased them the land pay for post production costs,.........Govenor Gashole Corbett better get all the pro industy laws on the books now because his first term will be his last,,,,,,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
455 Posts
OneLongShot said:
all that energy independence being shipped to China as we speak,...
LongShot,
I don't want to get into a debate over gas drilling or who did what to whom, but I did want to correct this part of your post. According to the US Energy Information Administration, there is currently no natural gas being exported from the US to China. In fact, other than a small amount in 2011, there hasn't been any gas sent from the US to China in the past eight years.

http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_eng_nus-nch_mmcfA.htm

I probably wouldn't have bothered bringing it up, except that I saw you posted that same statement a couple of times in this forum and I just wanted to make sure everyone was going by the correct information.

Just FYI.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,829 Posts
OneLongShot said:
Yeah, and the shale industry runs a squeaky clean operation.......all that energy independence being shipped to China as we speak, all those jobs for residents of PA, Companies stealing royalty money through loopholes to make the people who leased them the land pay for post production costs,.........Govenor Gashole Corbett better get all the pro industy laws on the books now because his first term will be his last,,,,,,

I don't get where people get this "no jobs for people from PA fallacy" Sure, a lot of the guys that are working on the rigs are employees from out of state, but do you really want someone doing that job that is not trained to do it????? I don't, and I know it isn't something that yo can just pick up in a day............

People refuse to consider the fact that, a large amount of jobs have been created in the construction sector, and the trucking sector.......The major construction companies around here have actually grown, directly sue to the gas industry, thus creating more jobs.......I know the company I work for created 400-500 jobs alone, as a direct result of the gas industry.............if we did not have the gas work, we would have had to cut our work force by as much as 40% due to the recession, and lack of funding for Penn Dot, and government subsidized work........So, before you ramble on about things you really have no idea about, maybe you should take some time to consider that there are a lot of local people out there, that would be out of work, if we were not fortunate to get a big economical boost from the gas industry.......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,101 Posts
OneLongShot said:
Yeah, and the shale industry runs a squeaky clean operation.......all that energy independence being shipped to China as we speak, all those jobs for residents of PA, Companies stealing royalty money through loopholes to make the people who leased them the land pay for post production costs,.........Govenor Gashole Corbett better get all the pro industy laws on the books now because his first term will be his last,,,,,,
I was strictly speaking about his actions towards on older lady. What a coward to hide behind email aliases to threaten or harass anyone. If someone thinks his actions are justified because they don't like the way these companies operate then I don't know what to say. Disgusting maybe?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,391 Posts
grousechaser said:
OneLongShot said:
all that energy independence being shipped to China as we speak,...
LongShot,
I don't want to get into a debate over gas drilling or who did what to whom, but I did want to correct this part of your post. According to the US Energy Information Administration, there is currently no natural gas being exported from the US to China. In fact, other than a small amount in 2011, there hasn't been any gas sent from the US to China in the past eight years.

http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_eng_nus-nch_mmcfA.htm

I probably wouldn't have bothered bringing it up, except that I saw you posted that same statement a couple of times in this forum and I just wanted to make sure everyone was going by the correct information.

Just FYI.

China, Korea, Europe..... the pipelines aren't in place but they are being built. I use China as a scapegoat, because......well' no one really cares much for China. But if you look at what's being put into place, who owns a good share of many of these companies and gas plays, then you'll see the gas is being primed to be shipped. Hey if we kept it here, built more infrastructure and our legiscritters were serious about "Energy" independence, my stance would probably be a bit different.......but money talks, politicians sell out to those who fund them and in the end, the tax payer ends up holding the bag.........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,132 Posts
We buy oil from foreign country's, what is wrong with selling the NG ? Evens out the trade deficet a little doesn't it ?
In case you haven't noticed, world wide trade has been going on for a few years.
It is very handy for farmers and a ton of other business's in this country, as well as other country's.
I say we should sell the Chinese as much as they will buy , until we get our country to a point where we can use the gas. Lets use there money to help build the infrastructure in our country to use the gas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,391 Posts
But what about energy independence??? There's only so much gas in them there hills and when that's gone???? The smart thing would be to use the gas at market prices here in the US...... sell it all to China or Russia, they take it and when ours runs out, they drill theirs using our technology (stolen like the Chinese do) and sell us at some nice marked up pricing...... Sorry I'm a cynic and don't trust the gas companies until they earn it...

Something else to chew on this fine rainy day...

http://stateimpact.npr.org/pennsylvania/...combine-leases/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,940 Posts
Buckshot1822 said:
I don't get where people get this "no jobs for people from PA fallacy"
They're opening a new manufacturing plant here in Sharon that will be building components for the gas rigs. They're starting out hiring around 200 people, 75 of them welders from what I've been told. That's a needed boost for this area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,132 Posts
Ain't it funny how none of the anti's want to comment on the good part.....jobs!!!!!

Something tells me that most anti's enjoy living off the system....not working to supply it........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
From The Center For Economic And Policy Research:

The most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show employment in the oil and gas industry to be 4,144 in Pennsylvania.

Rather than trying to project what will happen in the future, one could look at what the employment impact has been from Pennsylvania’s love affair with fracking since 2007, using actual employment data readily available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

What the data tell us is that fracking has created very few jobs. In fact, employment in five northeast Pennsylvania counties (McKean, Potter, Tioga, Bradford and Susquehanna) with high drilling activity declined by 2.7 percent. Of course, the economy was in a recession, and it is possible that employment would have decreased by more had it not been for fracking. To evaluate this, one can look at the employment trend in five adjacent New York counties (Allegany, Steuben, Chemung, Tioga and Broome) which had a moratorium on fracking. By assuming that the change in employment in the five PA counties would have been the same as in the five NY counties, a baseline for employment can be established if no hydraulic fracturing had occurred. In the five NY counties, employment declined by 5.2 percent over the three year period. Had employment declined by the same rate in the PA counties as in the NY counties since 2007, employment would have been 51,950 instead of 53,300 in 2010. This suggests that hydraulic fracturing contributed to the creation of around 1,350 jobs – this includes both direct jobs in the gas industry, indirect jobs in the supply chain and induced jobs from spending by workers and landowners. (An industry-funded study by the Public Policy Institute of New York projects that the same drilling level would create 62,620 jobs in New York).

In rural areas with few job opportunities and high unemployment rates, the creation of 1,350 jobs would still be good news, if it were not for the fact that most of the jobs go to workers from out-of-state. A survey of gas companies, conducted by the Marcellus Shale Education & Training Center, showed that 70 to 80 percent of workers were out of state.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,132 Posts
Funny stuff. Comparing the NY county's that include Binghamton, Vestal, Elmira, Horseheads, etc etc ....To the rural Pa county's. Makes about as much sense as the rest of those numbers for employment......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,829 Posts
g17 said:
From The Center For Economic And Policy Research:

The most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show employment in the oil and gas industry to be 4,144 in Pennsylvania.

Rather than trying to project what will happen in the future, one could look at what the employment impact has been from Pennsylvania’s love affair with fracking since 2007, using actual employment data readily available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

What the data tell us is that fracking has created very few jobs. In fact, employment in five northeast Pennsylvania counties (McKean, Potter, Tioga, Bradford and Susquehanna) with high drilling activity declined by 2.7 percent. Of course, the economy was in a recession, and it is possible that employment would have decreased by more had it not been for fracking. To evaluate this, one can look at the employment trend in five adjacent New York counties (Allegany, Steuben, Chemung, Tioga and Broome) which had a moratorium on fracking. By assuming that the change in employment in the five PA counties would have been the same as in the five NY counties, a baseline for employment can be established if no hydraulic fracturing had occurred. In the five NY counties, employment declined by 5.2 percent over the three year period. Had employment declined by the same rate in the PA counties as in the NY counties since 2007, employment would have been 51,950 instead of 53,300 in 2010. This suggests that hydraulic fracturing contributed to the creation of around 1,350 jobs – this includes both direct jobs in the gas industry, indirect jobs in the supply chain and induced jobs from spending by workers and landowners. (An industry-funded study by the Public Policy Institute of New York projects that the same drilling level would create 62,620 jobs in New York).

In rural areas with few job opportunities and high unemployment rates, the creation of 1,350 jobs would still be good news, if it were not for the fact that most of the jobs go to workers from out-of-state. A survey of gas companies, conducted by the Marcellus Shale Education & Training Center, showed that 70 to 80 percent of workers were out of state.
I don't buy it.........and by the way, you are only looking at jobs directly related to fracking........not the jobs created by the following: Roadway Construction, Roadway Rehab, Pad Construction, Impoundment Construction, Water Hauling, Pipeline Construction, Well Maintenance, Security Positions.............

I know nothing will ever change your little fallacy, but I live this stuff every day.........if not for the gas drilling jobs, the economy of rural PA would be in complete shambles and disarray..........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,477 Posts
Buckethead said:
Buckshot1822 said:
I don't get where people get this "no jobs for people from PA fallacy"
They're opening a new manufacturing plant here in Sharon that will be building components for the gas rigs. They're starting out hiring around 200 people, 75 of them welders from what I've been told. That's a needed boost for this area.
Tons of jobs being created. My buddies are busy as H---! Steamfitters and Equipment operators, they can't get enough of them!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
Buckshot1822 said:
g17 said:
From The Center For Economic And Policy Research:

The most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show employment in the oil and gas industry to be 4,144 in Pennsylvania.

Rather than trying to project what will happen in the future, one could look at what the employment impact has been from Pennsylvania’s love affair with fracking since 2007, using actual employment data readily available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

What the data tell us is that fracking has created very few jobs. In fact, employment in five northeast Pennsylvania counties (McKean, Potter, Tioga, Bradford and Susquehanna) with high drilling activity declined by 2.7 percent. Of course, the economy was in a recession, and it is possible that employment would have decreased by more had it not been for fracking. To evaluate this, one can look at the employment trend in five adjacent New York counties (Allegany, Steuben, Chemung, Tioga and Broome) which had a moratorium on fracking. By assuming that the change in employment in the five PA counties would have been the same as in the five NY counties, a baseline for employment can be established if no hydraulic fracturing had occurred. In the five NY counties, employment declined by 5.2 percent over the three year period. Had employment declined by the same rate in the PA counties as in the NY counties since 2007, employment would have been 51,950 instead of 53,300 in 2010. This suggests that hydraulic fracturing contributed to the creation of around 1,350 jobs – this includes both direct jobs in the gas industry, indirect jobs in the supply chain and induced jobs from spending by workers and landowners. (An industry-funded study by the Public Policy Institute of New York projects that the same drilling level would create 62,620 jobs in New York).

In rural areas with few job opportunities and high unemployment rates, the creation of 1,350 jobs would still be good news, if it were not for the fact that most of the jobs go to workers from out-of-state. A survey of gas companies, conducted by the Marcellus Shale Education & Training Center, showed that 70 to 80 percent of workers were out of state.
I don't buy it.........and by the way, you are only looking at jobs directly related to fracking........not the jobs created by the following: Roadway Construction, Roadway Rehab, Pad Construction, Impoundment Construction, Water Hauling, Pipeline Construction, Well Maintenance, Security Positions.............
"this includes both direct jobs in the gas industry, indirect jobs in the supply chain and induced jobs from spending by workers and landowners."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,829 Posts
g17 said:
Buckshot1822 said:
g17 said:
From The Center For Economic And Policy Research:

The most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show employment in the oil and gas industry to be 4,144 in Pennsylvania.

Rather than trying to project what will happen in the future, one could look at what the employment impact has been from Pennsylvania’s love affair with fracking since 2007, using actual employment data readily available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

What the data tell us is that fracking has created very few jobs. In fact, employment in five northeast Pennsylvania counties (McKean, Potter, Tioga, Bradford and Susquehanna) with high drilling activity declined by 2.7 percent. Of course, the economy was in a recession, and it is possible that employment would have decreased by more had it not been for fracking. To evaluate this, one can look at the employment trend in five adjacent New York counties (Allegany, Steuben, Chemung, Tioga and Broome) which had a moratorium on fracking. By assuming that the change in employment in the five PA counties would have been the same as in the five NY counties, a baseline for employment can be established if no hydraulic fracturing had occurred. In the five NY counties, employment declined by 5.2 percent over the three year period. Had employment declined by the same rate in the PA counties as in the NY counties since 2007, employment would have been 51,950 instead of 53,300 in 2010. This suggests that hydraulic fracturing contributed to the creation of around 1,350 jobs – this includes both direct jobs in the gas industry, indirect jobs in the supply chain and induced jobs from spending by workers and landowners. (An industry-funded study by the Public Policy Institute of New York projects that the same drilling level would create 62,620 jobs in New York).

In rural areas with few job opportunities and high unemployment rates, the creation of 1,350 jobs would still be good news, if it were not for the fact that most of the jobs go to workers from out-of-state. A survey of gas companies, conducted by the Marcellus Shale Education & Training Center, showed that 70 to 80 percent of workers were out of state.
I don't buy it.........and by the way, you are only looking at jobs directly related to fracking........not the jobs created by the following: Roadway Construction, Roadway Rehab, Pad Construction, Impoundment Construction, Water Hauling, Pipeline Construction, Well Maintenance, Security Positions.............
"this includes both direct jobs in the gas industry, indirect jobs in the supply chain and induced jobs from spending by workers and landowners."
No way is that number right then................I know for sure that around 1000 jobs were created among 3 large construction companies in this area, just because of the gas field........

For instance, I seriously doubt that any of the 600 jobs at the company that I work for are added into that 4144 job total........our jobs are probably considered highway construction, as that was the main work that we did, until the gas boom..........now pretty much each and every one of those 600 jobs are somehow involved with the gas business at some point in time........and there are 2 other construction companies that are larger than us, which are operating in the same manner.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
Buckshot1822 said:
g17 said:
Buckshot1822 said:
g17 said:
From The Center For Economic And Policy Research:

The most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show employment in the oil and gas industry to be 4,144 in Pennsylvania.

Rather than trying to project what will happen in the future, one could look at what the employment impact has been from Pennsylvania’s love affair with fracking since 2007, using actual employment data readily available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

What the data tell us is that fracking has created very few jobs. In fact, employment in five northeast Pennsylvania counties (McKean, Potter, Tioga, Bradford and Susquehanna) with high drilling activity declined by 2.7 percent. Of course, the economy was in a recession, and it is possible that employment would have decreased by more had it not been for fracking. To evaluate this, one can look at the employment trend in five adjacent New York counties (Allegany, Steuben, Chemung, Tioga and Broome) which had a moratorium on fracking. By assuming that the change in employment in the five PA counties would have been the same as in the five NY counties, a baseline for employment can be established if no hydraulic fracturing had occurred. In the five NY counties, employment declined by 5.2 percent over the three year period. Had employment declined by the same rate in the PA counties as in the NY counties since 2007, employment would have been 51,950 instead of 53,300 in 2010. This suggests that hydraulic fracturing contributed to the creation of around 1,350 jobs – this includes both direct jobs in the gas industry, indirect jobs in the supply chain and induced jobs from spending by workers and landowners. (An industry-funded study by the Public Policy Institute of New York projects that the same drilling level would create 62,620 jobs in New York).

In rural areas with few job opportunities and high unemployment rates, the creation of 1,350 jobs would still be good news, if it were not for the fact that most of the jobs go to workers from out-of-state. A survey of gas companies, conducted by the Marcellus Shale Education & Training Center, showed that 70 to 80 percent of workers were out of state.
I don't buy it.........and by the way, you are only looking at jobs directly related to fracking........not the jobs created by the following: Roadway Construction, Roadway Rehab, Pad Construction, Impoundment Construction, Water Hauling, Pipeline Construction, Well Maintenance, Security Positions.............
"this includes both direct jobs in the gas industry, indirect jobs in the supply chain and induced jobs from spending by workers and landowners."
No way is that number right then................I know for sure that around 1000 jobs were created among 3 large construction companies in this area, just because of the gas field........

For instance, I seriously doubt that any of the 600 jobs at the company that I work for are added into that 4144 job total........our jobs are probably considered highway construction, as that was the main work that we did, until the gas boom..........now pretty much each and every one of those 600 jobs are somehow involved with the gas business at some point in time........and there are 2 other construction companies that are larger than us, which are operating in the same manner.....
If the 600 jobs you are speaking of at your company(and whatever the number is at the other 2 construction companies) existed prior to the gas boom, why would you expect them to be included in the statistics for "created by the industry"?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,132 Posts
Maybe because if it were not for the gas industry, those 600 people would be on the UC line as opposed to working. It is quite obvious to most who read his post, that the work they have is gas related, as road work is slowed way down. So go ahead and pick his statement apart, but the bottom line is those jobs would not exists without the gas business. The fact is the company's were able to switch to gas work as opposed to lay them off, a big win for the employees, but I realize that for the anti crowd, laying them off would have been the big win for them.
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top