The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
289 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Mt. Lebanon hiring firm to count deer
February 7, 2013 5:42 am

By Harry Funk
Mt. Lebanon police received more than 150 deer-related calls over a one-year period.
That breaks down to about one every other day, and the frequency has not gone unnoticed around the community.
"It is something that came to light while I was campaigning," said Kristen Linfante, who was elected as Ward 3 commissioner in 2011. "Deer management and deer problems were by far the biggest issue that people brought to me. Of all of the things that a municipality has to address, the No. 1 topic that repeatedly came up was, 'What are you going to do about the deer problem?' "
Mt. Lebanon last addressed it in the winter of 2006-07, with sharpshooters carrying out a cull. Since then, the local deer population may -- or may not -- be growing.
Commissioners decided to spend up to $12,000, a late addition to the 2013 budget, to conduct surveys to estimate how many deer are in Mt. Lebanon. The municipality is soliciting proposals from qualified companies to perform a count, possibly starting this month.
In the meantime, the relative numbers are anyone's guess.
Kelly Fraasch, Ward 5 commissioner, has heard many of the same concerns.
But now, "I have been getting phone calls and emails that people aren't seeing as many deer as they used to," she said. "They used to sit in Rollier's parking lot near the mulch bags, watching people, but they have not been there for months now.
"Public perception is one thing, and we have to be careful of that," she said. "We might think we're being overtaken by deer, but there might not be as many as we really think."
The impending survey should provide a clearer picture for municipal officials, who have no data available since the cull six years ago.
A survey method commissioners have discussed involves aerial infrared sensor technology, which provides "superb resolution and the ability to determine animals by their morphology or body shape," according to the website for Vision Air Research, an Idaho-based wildlife survey company. "We can see the deer's ears."
While the survey process is in the works, commissioners also are talking about taking more immediate measures, such as offering educational programs on deer-resistant gardening and posting more "deer crossing" signs.
"Even if it seems like a simple thing, it does alert drivers that this area does have deer, especially for visitors," Mrs. Fraasch said. "We're so close to Pittsburgh, they might not think we have deer."
Of course, the major consideration in addressing a perceived deer problem is the method.
"I'm hearing that they want a cull," said Ms. Linfante, who has publicly stated her own support for such a measure. "I think people recognize that not only is it necessary, but it's really the only viable solution at this point if we really want to reduce numbers."
A counter argument involves public safety considerations with the discharge of firearms.
"I am adamant in my belief that the risk of anyone being injured in a cull is far, far less than anyone being injured in a conflict with the deer," Ms. Linfante said. "Not that I believe nothing could possibly happen, but the benefits certainly outweigh the risks."
An alternative to culling, though, might be the way the commission decides to go.
Mrs. Fraasch has composed and posted online a four-page document, "Deer in Mt. Lebanon," based on her several months of research on the topic. In it, she expresses her opposition to hunting by rifle or bow, instead favoring sterilization by removal of does' ovaries as a viable option.
She cites a significant cost savings over the long term and mitigation of some hazards associated with culling.
"In most cases during a cull, deer get anxious and dart, which can create an unsafe environment for vehicles in the area," she states in the document. "In articles pertaining to deer culling, most communities confirm this phenomenon by reporting an increase in deer-car collisions in the first year of a cull."
How the municipality ends up proceeding will be under scrutiny by a large number of residents. But the ultimate effectiveness can go only so far.
"There is a group of people who say, 'We want to eradicate deer,' " Mrs. Fraasch said. "That's never going to happen in Western Pennsylvania, no matter what we do."
Harry Funk, freelance writer: [email protected].
First Published February 7, 2013 5:42 am


Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/loca.../#ixzz2KEh7EtwF
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,796 Posts
<span style="font-style: italic">Mrs. Fraasch has composed and posted online a four-page document, "Deer in Mt. Lebanon," based on her several months of research on the topic. In it, she expresses her opposition to hunting by rifle or bow, <span style="font-weight: bold">instead favoring sterilization by removal of does' ovaries as a viable option</span>.</span>


Interesting. trap, neuter and release for deer now.

Soooo besides the obvious cost of the surgery, trapping, recovery of wildlife, she wants to return them to continue to be a health hazard as they were before all the effort.

I do hope that Mt. Lebanon has a robust archery hunting program in place to justify the need for the culls so far and into the future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,486 Posts
I doubt a township can afford the amount of deer needed to preform nutering. I believe the cost is 200-1K a deer. Gonacon has it's costs (if it is approved yet, don't remember) not including trapping and injecting each individual deer. Still not more than 88% effective yet either (and this is just the first year, effectivness drops after 1st year). However, they are currently looking just for a count survay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,496 Posts
Soooo besides the obvious cost of the surgery, trapping, recovery of wildlife
I doubt a township can afford the amount of deer needed to preform nutering.
Yinz guys are speaking from afar obviously. If Yinz lived in SW PA, you would more than likely know that Mt. Lebo can certainly afford to trap and perform surgery on every deer in their Twp., the entire county, and possibly the state..... and still have enough left over for a steak dinner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,297 Posts
Now I know where I'm gonna be scouting this year
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,796 Posts
All I know is the TNR of deer, like feral cats are done now but without the rabies vaccine and ear snip, will not now or at anytime in the future be allowed by the GC on wild animals. Just ain't ever happening.


Nor is the GC going to allow the usage of the Department of Ag approved Gongracon (sp) contraceptive. That was decided about two years ago. The use of hunting supplemented by sharpshooters seems to be the approved methods in PA.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,496 Posts
The use of hunting supplemented by sharpshooters seems to be the approved methods in PA.
Forget hunting in Mt. Lebo, Upper St. Clair, etc.... There is obviously a time and place for hunting of course (or this site wouldn't be here), but those Twp.'s are not the place. There is NO access, and those people don't want Deer with gaping razor wounds dying next to the shrubbery of their multi-million dollar mansions. You want to see an uproar, and a black eye for "true" hunting, let em try it.

Sharpshooting, under night cover, and as silenced as possible, with highly skilled personnel, is about the only answer to the problem that exists in many communities. As much as everybody on this board would like hunting to be the answer in these cases.... it is not.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,988 Posts
I hope the sharpshooters are sharper then those at the Gettys. battlefield, if any of you seen the video footage....sharpshooters, what a joke, can't be a SS if you have to gut shoot them over bait.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,887 Posts
Fleero is correct very tough to access in those townships. I have been minimally successful. Got a "maybe" after spending six weeks installing retaining walls.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
Mt Lebo has a bunch of (not all) uppity types that have some $. They- much like many non hunters think deer are cute until they decide to eat all of the landscaping that Deer Archer puts in. The people that feed the deer only add to the problems. Im sure there are many that do. The sharpshooters while effective IMO will never kill all the deer - once a few get kiled the others arent stupid. They lay low and or move to another "safe" area. Plus really I wouldnt trust "professional sharpshooters" around my dog and aor kids. The area is very densely populated. Bowhunting could be a supplement to help control the population. BUT too many are against it. I m not sure but WMA may hunt parts but not sure how effective they are.

I only hope the adament anti hunters are the ones that hit the deer with their vehicles. They truly deserve it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,576 Posts
I found some of the great potential hunting areas are large populated metropolitan suburban areas, like southern Allegheny County. I walked in the area five and ten years ago, and I recall a deer cull in the area.

The problem is the area with scattered wooded areas and open areas proves ideal for deer production. Better than some of the wall to wall forest areas, where hunters hunt.

The problem for the hunter, it's just not ideal for hunter participation. And it's never going to be an oasis for the hunter.
I remember a non-hunting homeowner offered me the use of a deck attached to their house for a deer stand. If it were legal, it would have been a great deer stand. The owner saw numerous deer in her back yard. But unfortunately, the closeness of neighbors made the use for a tree stand impossible for any hunter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
Bigwoods Hunter said:
Mt Lebo has a bunch of (not all) uppity types that have some $. They- much like many non hunters think deer are cute until they decide to eat all of the landscaping that Deer Archer puts in. The people that feed the deer only add to the problems. Im sure there are many that do. The sharpshooters while effective IMO will never kill all the deer - once a few get kiled the others arent stupid. They lay low and or move to another "safe" area. Plus really I wouldnt trust "professional sharpshooters" around my dog and aor kids. The area is very densely populated. Bowhunting could be a supplement to help control the population. BUT too many are against it. I m not sure but WMA may hunt parts but not sure how effective they are.

I only hope the adament anti hunters are the ones that hit the deer with their vehicles. They truly deserve it.
I always crack up when they call the hunters "sharpshooters" in the parks around Philly. It's a weird PR thing to make people think they are not actual hunters?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
30,400 Posts
Mrs. Fraasch has composed and posted online a four-page document, "Deer in Mt. Lebanon," based on her several months of research on the topic. In it, she expresses her opposition to hunting by rifle or bow, instead favoring sterilization by removal of does' ovaries as a viable option.
She cites a significant cost savings over the long term and mitigation of some hazards associated with culling.
"In most cases during a cull, deer get anxious and dart, which can create an unsafe environment for vehicles in the area," she states in the document. "In articles pertaining to deer culling, most communities confirm this phenomenon by reporting an increase in deer-car collisions in the first year of a cull."
That's some interesting concept right there.
If you shoot the deer to cull them they get so shook up that they run into cars for the next year, but if you capture them and cut out their ovaries they're not troubled by the experience? That must be what they call a scientific phenomenon, kind of like how if you turn off all the lights that Mrs. Fraasch can find her way around the room by using echo location.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
236 Posts
Bigwoods Hunter said:
Mt Lebo has a bunch of (not all) uppity types that have some $. They- much like many non hunters think deer are cute until they decide to eat all of the landscaping that Deer Archer puts in. The people that feed the deer only add to the problems. Im sure there are many that do. .
Yuppies living in the sub-division!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
487 Posts
mus42tang said:
I found some of the great potential hunting areas are large populated metropolitan suburban areas, like southern Allegheny County. I walked in the area five and ten years ago, and I recall a deer cull in the area.

The problem is the area with scattered wooded areas and open areas proves ideal for deer production. Better than some of the wall to wall forest areas, where hunters hunt.

The problem for the hunter, it's just not ideal for hunter participation. And it's never going to be an oasis for the hunter.
I remember a non-hunting homeowner offered me the use of a deck attached to their house for a deer stand. If it were legal, it would have been a great deer stand. The owner saw numerous deer in her back yard. But unfortunately, the closeness of neighbors made the use for a tree stand impossible for any hunter.
Well not quite impossible, you would just have to have everyone within 50 yds of the stands position permission. Now that might be impossible to get, but you never know until you try.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top