The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
26,979 Posts
It looks like native honeysuckle vine, the leaves are opposite as they should be.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
26,979 Posts
If not, just wait until it starts to bloom this late spring and dig out a couple plugs with the roots attached and transplant it. I have no idea if the vine will root for you in water or not but you can buy some stuff, I can't think of what of is called, some kind of rooting food you put in the water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,204 Posts
If not, just wait until it starts to bloom this late spring and dig out a couple plugs with the roots attached and transplant it. I have no idea if the vine will root for you in water or not but you can buy some stuff, I can't think of what of is called, some kind of rooting food you put in the water.
Rooting hormone...but there are two different types.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,806 Posts
When we had PGC biologist at our camp he told us that that there was no real wildlife benefit to having honeysuckle , get rid of it as it's invasive. Good thing is it has shallow roots and almost all plants can be uprooted by hand. Very old stuff comes out with front end loader or backhoe easy too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,204 Posts
When we had PGC biologist at our camp he told us that that there was no real wildlife benefit to having honeysuckle , get rid of it as it's invasive. Good thing is it has shallow roots and almost all plants can be uprooted by hand. Very old stuff comes out with front end loader or backhoe easy too.
That is surprising to me. The beagles typically find a fair amount of bunnies at our place amongst the honeysuckle plants.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
26,979 Posts
It may not have food value but it has great cover value and it has value to bees which have value to plants and trees that wildlife need. I am surprised that a biologist would tell you to get rid of a native plant when we are over run with invasives.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jimsdad

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I can tell you that the honeysuckle that we have at camp is eaten by deer. You can clearly see where it is nipped off where it is within reach of the deer.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
26,979 Posts
You don't have to convince me drew, I know they do. Wald must have been talking to a Fish Commission biologist, it is isn't wet or slimy they don't know much about it.>:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,595 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
714 Posts
I always liked it myself and tried to find some place to buy and plant and found out the same way about it being invasive which is why you do not see it for sale anywhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I tried looking information up also, but I could not find much on vine honeysuckle. None of what I saw had met the description of what I cut. I cut some last year from an area near where I cut this stuff, and it sprouted in water and I was able to transplant it to the mountains. It grew fairly well in a very sunny, moist spot. We recently cut several acres up there, and I would like to plant some more in the cut area. Ill have these cuttings in a windowsill for a few months to see what they do. I do remember one of the cuttings last year flowered while in the water, so maybe these will also and I can get a better idea of the exact variety.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,806 Posts
That is surprising to me. The beagles typically find a fair amount of bunnies at our place amongst the honeysuckle plants.
Most of our honeysuckle is in the woods, small and not thick at all. Biologist was saying don't let it get away from you in the woods . We have acres of autumn olive in old farm fields which is invasive as heck but deer ,rabbits, pheasants thrive in it for cover. berries are edible. Pick your poison .
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
26,979 Posts
Wald, are you talking about bush honeysuckle in the woods or honeysuckle vines?
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top