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Discussion Starter #1
Wonder if they are as good as Lyman.
I held one the other day a 50 cal. Flinter a club member wants to sell
Hawkens model and early production year gun only maybe mid 80's.
I think has a early style lock style hammer scrapes just a tad over center
I will say being a hawken rifle a little heavier then Thompson center hawken.
The rifle factory made looks excellent not many rounds down the bore .T bore still has the blue inside the bore ,no rust
Rifle a 50 cal. Any pro or cons on investarms black powder Rifles
 

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I had an invest arms flintlock that I inherited since around 1978, I have taken deer with it and have never had a problem with it.

 

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Watch this video.....of course, you'll have to bring a music player 'cause the song is why he can hit the target. :grin2:

If the gun is in good shape and he's asking a fair price, then you may want to buy it. Do a search on their quality and on what the going market rate appears to be.





 

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If my memory serves me right they are 2 different companies.Investarms and Investarm or Investarm and Invest Arms.
One inport by Richland other by Lyman.
 

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The only thing it has on it as an identifier is a large block style roman numeral I. I didnlt know who made it for a long time until I posted that picture here about 9 months ago and one of the black powder guys told me. It shoots well, I used to take it to Conservation camp every year and so did another CO and we would have a afternoon of the kids shooting them.
 

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Back in 1978 I started as a flintlock fanatic. My first was an Armsport Arms I won on a raffle, imported into VA by Invest Arms. It was an Italian made Hawken style flinter. My friend, now deceased master gunsmith Phillip Cravener, advised me to do certain procedures on any FACTORY made gun (TC, Lyman. CVA etc. Take it apart; Polish all the friction bearing parts; clean it up; If the bore has bluing in it, Lap treat it to shine; Put it back together and shoot a 100 plus round through it to season the barrel; Then decide if you're satisfied with the sites, or not. If not, replace them. But, when you can afford too, build, or have built, a custom rifle or smooth-bore of your liking by a reputable gun maker. By then you should have a basic understanding of the flintlock rifle. Never think you learned everything; You can't. Just listen to stories and choose you knowledge.
When I won that first flintlock, rathe rthan the finished gun, I opted to take the kit gun and a shooter and finishing kit with a pound each of FFg and FFFFg Goex powder and a couple other goodies. In the fall of 1978 the finished rifle was $129.00 while the kit was $69.99. The dealer gave me the extras and still made a couple bucks more. Phil said that I made an excellent, educated choice. Build it, learn some skill and get an informed understanding. That's also my suggestion for first timers. Don't try to build the scratch gun unless you've build things before that give you some very good skill. some mistakes are unfixable.
 

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Nothing wrong with Investarms,our family owns at least 4 of them and they all are excellent shooters. Only one downfall as far as I am concerned , and that is the sights. I change the sights on all of them.
 

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Watch this video.....of course, you'll have to bring a music player 'cause the song is why he can hit the target. :grin2:

If the gun is in good shape and he's asking a fair price, then you may want to buy it. Do a search on their quality and on what the going market rate appears to be.





https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P3VVRmtMlCc
First of all, this guy is gonna impale his hand one day pushing the ramrod like that, assuming its not of the flexible variety. Secondly, why when you're at the range do guys feel the need to replace the ramrod into the thimbles before each shot? No need to when you're target shooting. Our range rod stays on the table until we need it. Usually there are two of us shooting so we take turns using it. Too much trouble to replace it into the thimbles with each shot. Only time I return the rod to the thimbles is when I'm out hunting and load the gun up for the day.
 

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I just won a 50 cal. Lyman Great Plains Rifle through a Historical Society raffle. Looking at it, there are some noticeable things...

1. The box says Lyman, and under it "Made In Italy".
2. It comes with 2 manuals, one by Lyman, one Investarm SRL, Fabbrica D' Armi (the "Investarm" is singular)
3. The barrel has not only the capital Roman I inside a box logo, there are a handful of Italian proofing/inspection marks on the bottom flat. U.S.A. does not have a proofing requirement like Europe does, so those marks are the giveaway of European manufacture.

Investarm SRL also manufactures their own line of weapons. Their Model 170 is aka the Lyman GPR.

Muzzle loading rifles


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First of all, this guy is gonna impale his hand one day pushing the ramrod like that, ...
Yeah.....I noticed that. But for the replace the RR after every shot.....MEH.


The real question here is HOW MUCH $$$$?? What is the guy asking for it?

I just finished building a full stock Leman in .54 caliber. The parts alone cost me about $700. And I have about 350 hours in the build.

Now, I say this as no Lyman, Investment Arms nor Thompson Center is going to have the quality of lock, wood or barrel that a scratch build has. And yes, I own my current build and a T\C Hawken.....but I replaced the T\C Hawken with a Green Mt. barrel and it was well worth the cost.

If, IMHO, your paying more than $300 for the rifle....you need to seriously think of waiting for a T\C to come down the road and pick one up for $250.

Again.....MHO

ST
 

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Investarms/Lyman locks are historically more reliable than TC's. It was a popular fix for TC flintlocks to install a Lyman frizzen. TC frizzens were poorly hardened.

TC eventually fixed this many years later and changed their hammer geometry.

I've owned a number of TC flinters and Investarms flinters.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I had a chance to get out to the range today shot 15 rounds if 80 gr. 3F and 490 ball with 14 thou patch.
The gun shot excellent after sighting in at 25 yards.
I then went to 50 yards still shot 3 shots in a tight group.
I did have 1 hangfire in the flint.
I am going to polish the lock up and tune the lock as a winter project on the hole gun
I had a number of Flintlock made by Thompson center all were reliable when you did upgrade the frizzen to Lyman,went to a .070 vent liners @ the new hammer.
I am going to either shim the flint on the bottom to strike higher in the frizzen .
I was told RMC may sell the newer style hammer .
 
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