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Discussion Starter #1
I am sure we are all aware how serious the funding issue is for the PFBC right now. Especially for the trout program and hatcheries. I am really not happy about the Bellefonte and Oswayo hatcheries closing and am putting together a proposal for additional funding.

Here is the situation in a nutshell. The PFBC needs more money, but doesn't want to increase license fees for fear of losing fishermen and women in the end.

I have read many comments on here and other places of people who ARE willing to pay more for a license. What if the fishing license fees and trout/lake Erie stamp fees remained the same as they are now? But, every time a license, trout stamp, Lake Erie or combo license was sold, the purchaser was prompted if they wished to "pay more" or "make an additional donation" for funding especially of the trout program? What does everyone think of that?

This way, there is no license increase for those who cannot afford it. And those who can afford it and are willing to pay more are able to. People are not going to go out of their way to donate to the PFBC. But if they are prompted, they may be more likely to do it.

I do not wan this thread to turn into a debate about license costs. Please keep on topic as this is important. What are your thoughts or ideas for something like this???

I know this would not SOLVE the issue, but could it help?

Does anyone else have any ideas?
 

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i think you are confusing those that will pay an increased price to continue fishing with a desire to pay more.

Will i pay more if there is a license increase. Yes. Am i likely to voluntarily pay more. Heck no. Heck i am buying the 5 year license simply to avoid a license increase if it comes to be in the upcoming years.
 

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I'm pretty sure on the PALS system at the end right before you checkout their is an icon that comes up and asks would you like to donate to the PFBC. I used to work at a sports shop during college and remember seeing that when I typed up someones license. Mosts clerks don't ever bother to ask the question to the customer.
 

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the average die hard trout fisherman wouldnt mind paying more to raise more money, if everyone paid just a little bit more per year, and the people/businesses that have a lot of money made donations we could have a large number of "trophy trout". people arnt buying a license/stamp for many reasons but stocking 8 inch fish with nothing else is a big reason why.
 

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I am personally not a fan of publicly funded fish hatcheries and fish stocking, although I recognize they are justifiable in some limited situations.

However, rather than looking to raising money in order to spend more, I think there are opportunites to reduce costs in order to have money available to use in critial areas.

One of these for example would be to combine the fish, game, and boating into one commission.

Another would be to reduce fish stocking in streams that cannot support the carryover of fish from one year to the next, and (where necessary) stock only fingerlings in streams that do have fish carryover capabilities.

The PA fish commission wastes so much money now stocking trout in warm water mud holes, many of which die before the opening day of the season, a large percentage are caught by so-called fishermaen that use them for garden fertilizer, and the remainder die of natural causes before the end of April. You want to provide money funding for this folly?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
MT_flyfisher said:
I am personally not a fan of publicly funded fish hatcheries and fish stocking, although I recognize they are justifiable in some limited situations.
I lived right along the Madison River in MT for a while. Even the Mighty Madison gets stocked with hatchery raised trout from publicly funded hatcheries.
 

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MT_flyfisher said:
The PA fish commission wastes so much money now stocking trout in warm water mud holes, many of which die before the opening day of the season, a large percentage are caught by so-called fishermaen that use them for garden fertilizer, and the remainder die of natural causes before the end of April. You want to provide money funding for this folly?
I'm sorry but much of this simply isn't true. As someone who lives in a virtual wild trout desert for the most part, I have done a lot of observing over the last few years. I have caught fall stocked trout clear up until the spring stocking and have watched spring stocked trout survive into August or on occasion clear up until December. I'm not always fishing for them, I don't fish for trout when water temps hit 70, but I do watch to satisfy my own curiosity. While this may not be the case for every stream out there it is certainly the case for a lot of them. To say that most stocked trout die from natural causes by the end of April is just flat out not true, not even close.

Sorry to veer off topic here.
 

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Here are my beliefs. When the economy is strong and people are working, they have extra money and are willing to spend. Also, when there are jobs, companies and people pay taxes. The gov't can fund items like trout hatcheries......

Instead, the economy is weak, tax dollars are decreased, basic gov't programs take precedent over nonessential programs. It's an ugly cycle.

I fishing license with a trout stamp is still about the best money one can spend.
 

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kudu58 said:
MT_flyfisher said:
I am personally not a fan of publicly funded fish hatcheries and fish stocking, although I recognize they are justifiable in some limited situations.
I lived right along the Madison River in MT for a while. Even the Mighty Madison gets stocked with hatchery raised trout from publicly funded hatcheries.
The Madison River, along with every other river in Montana that is capable of sustaining a wild trout fishery, hasn't been stocked since 1974.

You'll be interested in reading this article: http://fwp.mt.gov/mtoutdoors/HTML/articles/2004/DickVincent.htm

Although there are surely many other articles like it available on the interent and elsewhere, that one will give you some background as to how this decision to stop stocking trout in those waters was made.

I live on the Yellowstone River during the summer, 35 miles north of Yellowstone National Park, and fish somewhere within a 150 mile or so radius of our place virtually every day. That area includes the Madison River, from its inception inside the Park, and for it's entier length to where it joins the Gallatin and Jefferson to form the Missouri at Three Forks, MT. I know a number of lakes that are stocked, but I am not of any rivers that are stocked within the geographic area I fish.

In fact, I can't think of any rivers that are stocked with trout within the entire state of Montana, although there may be some.
 

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eyefromthesky said:
MT_flyfisher said:
The PA fish commission wastes so much money now stocking trout in warm water mud holes, many of which die before the opening day of the season, a large percentage are caught by so-called fishermaen that use them for garden fertilizer, and the remainder die of natural causes before the end of April. You want to provide money funding for this folly?
I'm sorry but much of this simply isn't true. As someone who lives in a virtual wild trout desert for the most part, I have done a lot of observing over the last few years. I have caught fall stocked trout clear up until the spring stocking and have watched spring stocked trout survive into August or on occasion clear up until December. I'm not always fishing for them, I don't fish for trout when water temps hit 70, but I do watch to satisfy my own curiosity. While this may not be the case for every stream out there it is certainly the case for a lot of them. To say that most stocked trout die from natural causes by the end of April is just flat out not true, not even close.

Sorry to veer off topic here.
I'm not sure what a virtual wild trout desert is, but I can show you many streams in the #1 polluting county in PA that are stocked by the state that are exactly as I described, with the exception being that a few, but very few, stocked trout may survive into early May. Sure, there are stocked streams in that same PA county that have holdover trout, and maybe they're the same streams you're referring to. Those are the streams that all of us should, and many do, work to protect and promote in every way possible. Not by planting more hatchery fish in them, but by doing everything possible to make sure these stream born and bred trout will be there for generations to come.

The answer to better fishing doesn't always have to lie in stocking more trout.
 

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I hate to say but I have no problem with them shutting down every state run hatchery that can compete with a private hatchery in terms of their price per fish. Last I remember reading the state couldn;t come close producing a state fish for what a private hatchery can.... My opinion is to close down everyone that you can if they can;t produce fish for the cost that the private hatcheries can. If the government was run more like a business than a charity case, we would be in lot better shape.
 

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What about instead of buying a trout stamp, buy a package of 5 trout tags. You have to have at least one valid tag to fish an approved trout stream. If you place a trout on a stringer it has to be tagged. You can buy as many tags as you want or purchase more once yours are used up. Clubs that release trout are given free tags to distribute to their members.
The 5 tags allow everyone to participate for a small fee. Those who want to take more from the resource pay more.
 
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