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I am retiring next year. I have a plan. Going out west to hunt elk, mule deer, antelope, coyote and prarie dogs.

My plan is to hunt everything with my .270.

I am going to put together an antelope load, which is going to be 110 gr. Barnes TTSX's. I am going to sight in my .270 for that load. Next, I am going to work up different loads for the other hunts, BUT, instead of changing my zero each time, I am going to vary the charge or the powder to see if I can realistically shoot ideal bullets at each animal without using a second gun or adjusting my scope.

Can it be done?
 

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Can it be done?
Probably, but you will likely be making sacrifices/compromises that aren't really necessary, in most cases.

I have one rifle that will shoot two loads intended for different purposes, to the near-identical zero at 100 yards.

It's a 22-250 that's normally used for varmints, with 55gr Btip loads. By some experimentation (and luck), it will also shoot the 60gr Nosler Partition within a quarter inch of the zero for the Btips.

So it can be used for both 'chucks and deer, without major scope adjustments.

Personally, I would concentrate on one load for big game and another for 'yotes and p-dogs. The big game load for elk/mulies might be a tad "overkill" for antelopes, but it will work.
 

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It's be less of a pain to have one QD mount and a couple of scopes matched to the different loads.
 

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A suggestion. If you would use a 130 gr. Nosler Partition you wouldn't be compromising on anything in regard to big game hunted (prairie dogs the exception) and would be set to go without all the trouble of different loads. KISS comes to mind.

Muab
 

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Muab Dib said:
A suggestion. If you would use a 130 gr. Nosler Partition you wouldn't be compromising on anything in regard to big game hunted (prairie dogs the exception) and would be set to go without all the trouble of different loads. KISS comes to mind.

Muab
+1 Why make it any more difficult than it need be?

Do you own a lighter caliber varmint rifle? I'd suggest taking it as well. Shooting a couple hundred rounds of 270 in a day at prairie dogs sounds to me as very expensive, not much fun, and hard on a good big game rifle.
 

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Another thing. One of the main objectives of reloading for alot of us is to obtain the best accuracy with a certain bullet.

You undoubtably will sacrifice accuracy with at least one or more of your loads if you try this. You might get lucky and get two loads that will shoot under and inch and to the same point of impact, but I'd be suprised and willing to buy your rifle if it does what you are going to try. 3 or 4 loads all under an inch and the same impact point. I would definately buy that rifle. An inch is my own standard. If yours is 2 or 3 inches you might be able to achieve your objective.
 

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If your goal is to keep all your shots under 300 yards then you might be able to make it work. IF shooting past 30 yards then I doubt if you can get it to work.

Everything there sounds OK until you added prarie dogs. That is the real kicker. Your cartrdige choice is way to large for that target. You could easily burn that rifle up on a dogtown. And accuracty needed for PD's is considerably different than accuracy need for all the other big game you mentioned.

And I would not want to pay th bill for a PD hunt with Barnes bullets. Tom.
 

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I would buy a cheap 223 or a 22-250 to hunt the dogs. A 223 would be my choice. A case of ammo that shoots decent enough, and is relatively cheap would be a lot of fun. Once you get home you can choose to sell it. Would be a lot better off money wise than shooting that 270 all day.

Like someone else said. Pick a good bullet that will work for everything but the dogs and shoots well.
 

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Prarie Dog hunting can be murder on a barrel, and a 270 will leave you with a sore shoulder quick if you are talking a couple of hundred rounds....I used to use 130 gr. partitions here in Pa. for everything out of my 270, but then Pa. groundhog hunting is not as fast & furious as prarie dogging..I'd pick a 22-250 as much prarie dog shooting is beyond 223 ranges...Use the 270 for everything else.
 

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I would take a 223, 22-250 or smaller for pdogs. I take my 17hmr and 22 lr quite often because it is cheap to shoot and the barrel wont be glowing read after 15 shots.

Use the 270 for everything else.
 

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matt75bronco said:
I would take a 223, 22-250 or smaller for pdogs. I take my 17hmr and 22 lr quite often because it is cheap to shoot and the barrel wont be glowing read after 15 shots.

Use the 270 for everything else.

You can't be serious. You just spent how much time convincing me that the .270 is inadequate for Elk and now you recommend it.
 

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Big Ken said:
Prarie Dog hunting can be murder on a barrel, and a 270 will leave you with a sore shoulder quick if you are talking a couple of hundred rounds....I used to use 130 gr. partitions here in Pa. for everything out of my 270, but then Pa. groundhog hunting is not as fast & furious as prarie dogging..I'd pick a 22-250 as much prarie dog shooting is beyond 223 ranges...Use the 270 for everything else.
 

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There is really no cartridge that is appropiate for PDs and elk.

Some days I shoot 300 rounds, not with a 270. You are compromising on everything except antelope and deer.

But if you want to do it, forget the various reloads, that will NEVER work right. JasonN has the correct idea. If you use Weaver regular rings, they return to zero perfectly with just a nickle to tighten.
 

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You may want to consider what is the cheapest to shoot. If you come across a heavily populated prairie dog town its possible you could shoot up 100-200rds of ammo in a sitting. The .223 would give you the benefits of cheaper shooting plus the range over the .22rf LR/Mag.

I'd only use the larger caliber guns for the really long distance p-dogs. ...500+ yards. But, some land owners frown upon using the larger bore guns on their lands. Some will insist on "22" caliber guns when you ask to use their lands.
 

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I think on my next antelope hunt I'm going to take a simple .22lr along for these dog towns I stumble across. It hasn't been terribly difficult for me to get within .22 range of P-dogs and they are on my license, I just never shot one yet because I didn't feel like wasting a .270 shell on them. Next time I'm out though they're gettin' it.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Harrysigafoo said:
There is really no cartridge that is appropiate for PDs and elk.

Some days I shoot 300 rounds, not with a 270. You are compromising on everything except antelope and deer.

But if you want to do it, forget the various reloads, that will NEVER work right. JasonN has the correct idea. If you use Weaver regular rings, they return to zero perfectly with just a nickle to tighten.
My nephew just bought a .300 Win Mag and asked me to zero it in for him. It is a shooter. I got right around a half inch at a hundred with 71 grs. of IMR 4831 and 180 gr. Nosler Accubonds. I may take it, but I do have over a year to consider other options. My .270 is going though. It is accurate and I am used to the gun.

I don't own a varmint gun, but maybe it is time to buy one.

Thanks for all the input.
 

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moosehunter said:
matt75bronco said:
I would take a 223, 22-250 or smaller for pdogs. I take my 17hmr and 22 lr quite often because it is cheap to shoot and the barrel wont be glowing read after 15 shots.

Use the 270 for everything else.

You can't be serious. You just spent how much time convincing me that the .270 is inadequate for Elk and now you recommend it.
Never said it was inadequate, just not the best choice. If its all you have, thats what you should use. Now if you want a better elk rifle, go buy yourself a 300 RUM.
 

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I think your plan has merrit. However, I suggest that you take 2 x .270 rifles. Taking a trip such as you have planned and packing just 1 rifle, regardless of caliber, is asking for trouble and tempting fate: maybe both.....
 
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